Werth scores on unusual four-base error

Werth scores on unusual four-base error

PHOENIX -- Jayson Werth never quit on the play, and the Phillies were rewarded for their outfielder's hustle with a run.

With one out in the fourth inning of Friday's 7-4 loss to the D-backs, Werth lifted a fly ball to deep right-center. Arizona center fielder Chris Young camped under the ball and had the ball go into his glove.

What happened next is open to interpretation.

The ball wound up on the ground as Young reached into his glove to retrieve it. Second-base umpire Dale Scott ruled that Young dropped the ball, and Werth was able to come all the way around and score when the D-backs were slow to get the ball in thinking they already had the out.

"I felt like I caught it," Young said. "[Scott] just used his best judgment and the call was the call. You can't take it back, so there's no point in dwelling on it. I thought I caught the ball. It was in the pocket of my glove and I thought I lost it in the exchange, but maybe I just shouldn't lose it in the exchange next time. It doesn't matter now -- we came back and swung the bats well."

D-backs manager A.J. Hinch argued the call for quite some time, saying that the ball came loose while Young was transferring it from his glove to his throwing hand, and therefore, should have been an out. Hinch was ejected from the game, his first ejection of the year.

"I thought he caught it," Hinch said. "I saw what I thought was a change of direction, and to me, when the ball changes direction glove to hand, that indicates control, and [Scott] didn't see it that way. It was a disagreement. As he told me, it's tough to appeal that play because he's 80 feet from the play and any other umpire is going to be on the line. It's his call, and we disagreed about it."

The play, which was ruled a four-base error on Young, gave the Phillies a 2-0 lead, but the D-backs responded with five runs in the bottom half of the inning en route to the victory.

Steve Gilbert is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.