Reliever Simmons likely done for rest of season

Braves leaning toward resting rookie; Schlosser recalled to provide bullpen depth

Reliever Simmons likely done for rest of season

MIAMI -- While the Braves are not ready to declare Shae Simmons' season complete, general manager Frank Wren and manager Fredi Gonzalez both acknowledged that the right-handed reliever has likely run out of time with his bid to pitch again this year. Simmons has been sidelined since late July with a strained right shoulder.

Simmons had been aiming to rejoin Atlanta's bullpen during the latter part of August. But after making two rehab appearances for Triple-A Gwinnett, he was shut down again on Aug. 20 with what he described as an "extremely sore shoulder." The 23-year-old right-handed reliever has not been cleared to begin throwing again since then.

"He hasn't even gotten back on the mound yet," Gonzalez said. "There is no reason to push him."

When Simmons was placed on the disabled list on July 24, the Braves knew he would likely need 4-6 weeks of rest before pitching again. Because he experienced his setback a month after being initially shut down, the club is now leaning toward him resting for six weeks this time around. That would put him on schedule to begin throwing again during the early part of October.

After making his Major League debut on May 31, Simmons produced a 0.96 ERA and limited opponents to a .239 on-base percentage in his first 20 appearances. But he then created reason for concern as he produced a 15.00 ERA and allowed opponents to reach at a .529 clip during the six appearances that followed, leading up to his current DL stint.

With a little more than three weeks left in the regular season, the Braves will now make all of their bullpen plans with the understanding that Simmons will likely not pitch again until next year. To strengthen the depth of their relief corps, they recalled Gus Schlosser from Triple-A Gwinnett on Friday to join their expanded roster.

Mark Bowman is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.