A-Rod may discuss doctor with FBI

A-Rod may discuss doctor with FBI

TAMPA, Fla. -- Yankees third baseman Alex Rodriguez has been contacted by federal agents regarding a Canadian doctor under investigation for alleged drug violations not limited to professional athletes.

Rodriguez could join Mets shortstop Jose Reyes, as well as other non-baseball clients, among those who have spoken to authorities about Anthony Galea, a Toronto-based sports medicine doctor who has also worked with golf icon Tiger Woods.

"I'm aware of an investigation, and I plan on cooperating," Rodriguez said at George M. Steinbrenner Field after the Yankees' workout.

Rodriguez declined to comment when asked about the nature of his relationship with Galea, who faces charges in Canada of conspiring to smuggle human growth hormone and other drugs into the United States.

"I can't really get into that," Rodriguez said. "I know you guys have to ask those questions, but I have to speak to those guys first. You guys will know pretty much all at the same time."

The New York Times reported that people who have been briefed on the investigation have information that Rodriguez was treated by Galea at some point. Those people told the newspaper that they did not know when, or how often, Galea met with Rodriguez.

One athlete who was treated by Galea in Canada was told by the doctor that he had traveled to New York to treat Rodriguez, the newspaper reported, according to a person who talked to the athlete afterward.

Rodriguez had surgery on his right hip performed last March by Marc Philippon, a Vail, Colo.-based specialist, but he also worked with Mark Lindsay, a Canadian chiropractor who is reportedly an associate of Galea's.

The Yankees released the following statement on Monday: "The New York Yankees have not been contacted with regard to an investigation of Dr. Tony Galea. The Yankees never authorized Dr. Tony Galea to treat Alex Rodriguez, nor do we have any knowledge of any such treatment.

"The Yankees authorized Dr. Marc Philippon to operate on Alex and oversee his rehabilitation. At the request of Dr. Philippon, we also authorized Dr. Mark Lindsay to supervise the daily rehabilitation program established by Dr. Philippon. We will continue to monitor the situation."

Rodriguez said that he was "not sure" when the meeting with the agents would take place. The investigation is being led by federal authorities in the Buffalo, N.Y., area, where the case began when an assistant to Galea was caught transporting human growth hormone and other substances across the border in September.

"I'm just kind of waiting for instructions," Rodriguez said.

Yankees general manager Brian Cashman said he learned of the agents' request to speak with Rodriguez on Monday, and knew other details only from newspaper accounts, saying that he did not want to comment further until the Yankees "get caught up to speed."

Cashman said that Galea is "not someone that we've done business with," and that he is "not aware of any" other players who may be on the agents' lists.

It had been a quieter spring to date for the three-time American League Most Valuable Player, who reported to camp last season after addressing previous use of performance-enhancing drugs for three seasons with the Rangers from 2001-03.

Rodriguez had previously said that he was happy to be in camp talking only about baseball -- the biggest blip on his radar had been a minor fender-bender in Tampa on Thursday that caused no injuries -- and said on Monday that he was not concerned that these latest developments would create a cloud over his 2010 season.

"This is about someone else," Rodriguez said. "I'm going to cooperate the best I can and focus on baseball."

Bryan Hoch is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.