Third to first

• The White Sox will be happy to go back to night games Tuesday and Wednesday against the Indians and Friday against the Padres after Thursday's scheduled off-day. The last three games against the Yankees and Indians have all been 1:10 p.m. CT starts.

"It's weird. Playing a lot of day games in a row isn't all that easy when you're used to playing night games," Ventura said. "[During] Spring Training you get used to it because that's all you're doing, but once you get the season started, you're playing a lot of night games.

"You get these and it becomes, I don't know if it's difficult. But you see guys get a little more tired quicker than they normally would for a night game."

Ventura gave Paul Konerko, who is mired in a 4-for-35 slump, the day off on Monday, but he will be back in the lineup Tuesday night.

• Entering play Monday, 30 of the White Sox 52 games this season have been decided by three runs or fewer, including six of the last seven and 10 of the last 15. They have a 15-15 record in those 30 contests.

Scott Carroll will never forget his first Major League relief appearance Sunday, as it ended with a strikeout of Derek Jeter in what figures to be his last career at-bat in Chicago. More important, Carroll felt good throwing in relief and was ready to get back out to the mound Monday if needed.

"It felt great to be back out there and compete again," said Carroll, who hadn't been in a game since starting last Monday in Kansas City. "I was overall pretty happy with the way I threw the ball. I was getting ahead of guys. I was throwing all my pitches for strikes. That's crucial."

Carroll threw a bullpen session two days before this relief appearance.

Gordon Beckham got a rest Monday, with Semien playing second. Beckham is hitting .379 over a seven-game hitting streak and has a .341 average in his last 20 games. He also has a .481 average against left-handers this season.

Scott Merkin is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Merk's Works, and follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.