Second potential buyer talks to Rangers

Second potential buyer talks to Rangers

Rangers officials and members of Hicks Sports Group met with Pittsburgh attorney Check Greenberg and members of his investment group who have interest in purchasing the franchise from Tom Hicks on Wednesday.

This is the second of three meetings being held with prospective buyers. Houston businessman Jim Crane was in Dallas on Tuesday, while former agent Dennis Gilbert, who lives and is based in Los Angeles, is expected to meet with Rangers and HSG officials next week.

Rangers president Nolan Ryan was a part of the meeting. He has met with Greenberg prior to this, and there is a possibility he could be a part of the ownership group if this is the one that ultimately buys the team.

Hicks Sports Group issued a statement on Wednesday saying: "Officials with Hicks Sports Group and the Texas Rangers held a series of meetings Wednesday with a second potential investor group for the Texas Rangers. The meetings with Pittsburgh attorney Chuck Greenberg and his advisors were conducted at Rangers Ballpark in Arlington.

"The meetings included a tour of the facility and conferences with officials of both baseball and business operations of the Rangers. Team President Nolan Ryan and General Manager Jon Daniels were among the officials who met with Mr. Greenberg and his advisors. In general, the meetings were described as routine and part of the normal due diligence process."

Greenberg is chairman and managing partner of the Myrtle Beach Pelicans in the Carolina League and the State College (Pa.) Spikes in the New York-Penn League. He also was the chairman and managing partner of the Altoona Curve from 2002-08.

The Curve won the prestigious Larry MacPhail Promotional Award in 2004, the 2006 Baseball America Freitas Award as the top Double-A franchise and added the highest honor bestowed annually upon a Minor League Baseball club, the John H. Johnson President's Trophy, in 2006.

Greenberg also helped NHL Hall of Famer Mario Lemieux purchase the Pittsburgh Penguins in 1999, which saved the franchise from relocation.

Hicks has expressed a willingness to sell part or all of the team. But he has not made any final decisions and the possibility exists that he could remain substantially involved in any future ownership group.

Any sale would have to be approved by the other owners and almost certainly would have to have the support of Commissioner Bud Selig. But the three bidders are dealing directly with Hicks and his representatives, and not Major League Baseball.

T.R. Sullivan is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.