Worth noting

• The Tigers signed Rajai Davis last December to bring the kind of aggressiveness on the basepaths that they hadn't seen in a while. So far, the statistical pace is the most aggressive the Tigers have seen in years.

Davis' seven stolen bases entering Tuesday's game against the White Sox mark the most by a Tiger before the end of April since Juan Encarnacion stole the same number of bases in 1999. With more than a week to go before the calendar turns to May, Davis has a slight chance at the modern Tigers record of 12 steals by May 1, set by Gary Pettis in 1988.

The Tigers rarely have had players get off to fast starts on the bases in the Comerica Park era. Josh Anderson swiped six bases in April five years ago, which stood as the mark until Davis ran his way past it.

For Davis, though, this is a relatively normal pace. He went 6-for-7 in stolen bases in the opening month last season, and 10-for-10 in 2010.

• The odd call that abruptly stopped play in the seventh inning Monday was indeed a balk call on reliever Ian Krol. Umpires ruled he did not come to a complete stop before going home on his 2-2 pitch to Alejandro De Aza.

Krol followed through on his pitch, and De Aza grounded it to first base, but time was already called. Alexei Ramirez, who went from second to third base on the groundout, simply stayed there, while De Aza went back to the plate.

Ausmus said he looked at the video of the play and wasn't sure why a balk was called. Pitching coach Jeff Jones was similarly perplexed. Krol, however, told reporters on Tuesday that he indeed had balked.

"If Krol felt something," Ausmus said, "he probably did something to tip it off."

• Major League Baseball upheld the call of an error on Alex Gonzalez from Thursday's win over Cleveland. The call came on a sixth-inning ground ball to Yan Gomes, which Gonzalez fielded but threw wide to Miguel Cabrera as Gomes ran by. The call was later appealed.

Jason Beck is a reporter for MLB.com. Read Beck's Blog and follow him on Twitter @beckjason. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.