MLB Players Alumni Association Necrology

2017

Red Adams was born a on Oct. 8, 1921, in Parlier, Calif. and pitched for the Chicago Cubs during the 1946 season. In eight games, Adams recorded eight strikeouts. The legendary Tommy John gives Adams credit for encouraging him to throw more fastballs. Adams passed away on Jan. 18, 2017.

Ruben Amaro Sr. was born on Jan. 6, 1936, in Nuevo Laredo, Mexico and spent 11 seasons in the big leagues between the St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies, New York Yankees and California Angels. A versatile infielder, Amaro Sr. was a strong defender and played most of his career at shortstop. Offensively, Amaro Sr. collected 505 hits during his career and posted a .309 on-base percentage. In 1964, Amaro Sr. won a Gold Glove while with the Philadelphia Phillies. Amaro Sr. passed away on March 31, 2017, in Weston, Fla.

Vic Barnhart was born on Sept. 1, 1922, in Hagerstown, Md. and played for three seasons in the Majors. A shortstop and third baseman, Barnhart played in 74 games for the Pittsburgh Pirates from 1944 to 1946. In 204 at-bats, Barnhart collected 55 hits and drove in 19 runs, putting together a batting average of .270. Barnhart passed away on April 13, 2017, in his hometown of Hagerstown, Md.

Bob Bowman was born on May 10, 1931, in Laytonville, Calif. He played right field and pinch hit for the Philadelphia Phillies, making his MLB debut in 1955. Bowman held a batting average of .249 over the course of five seasons, compiling 17 homers. Bowman passed away on Jan. 27, 2017, in San Jose, Calif.

Jackie Brown was born on May 31, 1943, in Holdenville, Okla. and played for seven seasons in the Major Leagues between the Washington Senators, Texas Rangers, Cleveland Indians and Montreal Expos. A right-handed pitcher who appeared in 214 games, Brown posted an ERA of 4.18 and a record of 47-53. Brown passed away on Jan. 8, 2017, in Holdenville, Okla.

Mark Brownson was born on June 17, 1975, in Lake Worth, Fla. Brownson pitched for the Colorado Rockies and the Philadelphia Phillies, making his MLB debut in 1998. He held a 6.94 ERA over the course of three seasons. Brownson passed away on Feb. 1, 2017, in Wellington, Fla.

Bob Bruce was born on May 16, 1933, in Detroit and pitched for nine seasons between the Detroit Tigers, Houston Colt .45's and Atlanta Braves. In 219 appearances, Bruce collected 49 wins and posted an ERA of 3.85 in 1,122 1/3 innings pitched. Bruce passed away on March 15, 2017, in Plano, Texas.

Bob Cerv was born on May 5, 1925, in Weston, Neb. and played for 12 seasons in the big leagues as a right-handed hitting left fielder. In his career, Cerv clubbed 105 homers and drove in 374 runs, making an All-Star appearance in 1958 while with the Kansas City Athletics when he hit 38 homers, a single-season record for Major League Baseball in Kansas City. Cerv won a World Series with the New York Yankees in 1956 and was also roommates with Roger Maris and Mickey Mantle in 1961 when they were battling for the single-season home run record. Cerv passed away on April 6, 2017, in Blair, Neb.

Bill Champion was born on Sept. 18, 1947, in Shelby, N.C. and spent eight seasons in the big leagues. A right-handed pitcher, Champion played for the Philadelphia Phillies and Milwaukee Brewers, appearing in 202 games. Champion posted an ERA of 4.69 and a record of 34-50 in 804.1 innings pitched. Champion passed away on Jan. 7, 2017, in Shelby, N.C.

Jack Faszholz was born on April 11, 1927, in St. Louis and pitched in four games for the St. Louis Cardinals during the 1953 season. After his playing career, Faszholz coached the baseball team at Concordia University in Nebraska for 12 seasons. Faszholz passed away on March 25, 2017.

Todd Frohwirth was born on Sept. 28, 1962, in Milwaukee and pitched for nine seasons in the Major Leagues between the Philadelphia Phillies, Baltimore Orioles, Boston Red Sox and California Angels. In 284 games, Frohwirth went 20-19 with an ERA of 3.60 in 417 2/3 innings pitched. After his playing career, Frohwirth worked as a scout for the Baltimore Orioles. Frohwirth passed away on March 26, 2017.

Ned Garver was born Dec. 25, 1925, in Ney, Ohio. Garver pitched for the St. Louis Browns, Detroit Tigers, Kansas City Athletics and Los Angeles Angels, making his MLB debut in 1948. He held a 3.73 career ERA over the course of 14 seasons, finishing second in the 1951 American League MVP voting and making the American League All-Star roster that same season. Garver passed away on Feb. 26, 2017, in Bryan, Ohio.

Dallas Green was born on Aug. 4, 1934, in Newport, Del. and pitched for eight seasons in the big leagues between the Philadelphia Phillies, Washington Senators and New York Mets. In 185 games, Green posted a record of 20-22 and an ERA of 4.26. After his playing career, Green became involved in scouting and coaching, eventually becoming the manager of the Philadelphia Phillies and leading them to their first ever World Series championship in 1980. A beloved figure in the City of Brotherly Love, Green passed away on March 22, 2017, in Philadelphia.

Bill Hands was born on May 6, 1940, in Hackensack, N.J. and pitched for 11 seasons in Major League Baseball. A right-handed hurler, Hands spent 1966 to 1972 with the Chicago Cubs and finished his career with a record of 111-110, a strong ERA of 3.35 and 1,951 innings pitched. In 1969, Hands posted a fantastic season, going 20-14 with an ERA of 2.49 in exactly 300 innings pitched. Hands passed away on March 9, 2017, in Orlando, Fla.

Mark Higgins was born on July 9, 1963, in Miami and played in six games for the Cleveland Indians during the 1989 season. A right-handed hitting first baseman, Higgins was taken by the Texas Rangers in the 13th round of the 1983 MLB Draft and notched one hit and one walk during his time in MLB. Higgins passed away on March 22, 2017, in Duluth, Ga.

Greg Jelks was born on Aug. 16, 1961, in Cherokee, Ala. and played for the Philadelphia Phillies during the 1987 season. In 10 games, the corner infielder made 14 plate appearances. Jelks eventually served as an assistant coach for the Australian national team in the 2000 Olympics, 2001 Baseball World Cup and 2006 World Baseball Classic. Jelks passed away on Jan. 5, 2017, in Sydney, Australia.

Harry MacPherson was born on July 10, 1926, in North Andover, Mass. Macpherson pitched for the Boston Braves, making his MLB debut in 1944 at the age of 17. He pitched just one inning in the big leagues, collecting one strikeout and allowing one walk while surrendering no hits. He passed away on Feb. 19, 2017, in Englewood, Fla.

Andy Marté was born on Oct. 21, 1983, in Villa Tapia, Hermanas Mirabal, Dominican Republic. Throughout his career in Major League Baseball, Marté served as a third baseman and first baseman for the Cleveland Indians, Atlanta Braves and Arizona Diamondbacks. He played in 308 games, collecting 186 hits and clubbing 21 home runs. Marté passed away on Jan. 22, 2017, in the Dominican Republic.

Sam Mele was born on Jan. 21, 1922, in Astoria, N.Y. and played for six different teams during his 10 seasons in the Major Leagues. During his playing career, the right fielder and first baseman notched 916 hits and 80 homers, putting together a career batting average of .267. After he played, Mele served as the manager of the Minnesota Twins from 1961 to 1967, compiling a record of 524-436 and receiving the 1965 Manager of the Year Award. After his managerial career ended, Mele worked in the Boston Red Sox organization for 25 years, primarily as a scout. Mele passed away on May 1, 2017, in Quincy, Mass.

Morris Nettles was born on Jan. 26, 1952, in Los Angeles and played in 168 games between two seasons for the California Angels. A left-handed outfielder, Nettles collected 116 hits in 469 at-bats for an average of .247. During his two seasons in the Major Leagues, Nettles also swiped 42 bases on 68 attempts. Nettles passed away on Jan. 24, 2017, in Venice, Calif.

Luis Olmo was born on Aug. 11, 1919, in Arecibo, Puerto Rico and played six seasons in Major League Baseball between the Brooklyn Dodgers and the Boston Braves. The second Puerto Rican to play in the Major Leagues and the first to play in the World Series, Olmo drove in 110 runs in 1945, leading the National League in triples that year as well, with 13. In 462 career games, Olmo collected 458 hits, compiling a career average of .281. Olmo passed away on April 28, 2017, in San Juan, Puerto Rico.

Bob Sadowski was born on Jan. 15, 1937, in St. Louis and played for four seasons in the Major Leagues. A left-handed hitting third baseman and right fielder, Sadowski compiled 73 hits in 329 at-bats, swatting seven homers and driving in 46 runs. Sadowski passed away on Jan. 6, 2017, in St. Louis.

Roy Sievers was born on Nov. 18, 1926, in St. Louis and played for 17 seasons in Major League Baseball between the St. Louis Browns, Chicago White Sox, Philadelphia Phillies and both Washington Senators teams. A five-time All-Star, Sievers also won the first ever American League Rookie of the Year Award in 1949, batting .308 with 16 homers and 91 runs batted in during his rookie campaign for the St. Louis Browns. A right-handed first baseman and left fielder, Sievers slugged 318 homers and drove in 1,147 runs in his career, batting .267 along the way. He led the American League in home runs and runs batted in during the 1957 season. Sievers passed away on April 3, 2017, in Spanish Lake, Mo.

Daryl "Big Dee" Spencer was born on July 13, 1928, in Wichita, Kan. and played for 10 seasons between four different teams. A versatile infielder, Spencer finished his career with a slash-line of .244/.327/.380 and slugged 105 homers in 1,098 games. After starting his career with the New York Giants from 1952 to 1953, Spencer was called into military service during the Korean War, before returning to the team in 1956. After establishing himself as the team's starting shortstop, Spencer went on to hit the first home run on the West Coast for the newly relocated San Francisco Giants in 1958. Spencer's Major League career ended in 1963, after which he played in Japan for seven seasons. Spencer finished his professional career with 338 home runs. Spencer passed away on Jan. 2, 2017, in Wichita, Kan.

Dick Starr was born on March 2, 1921, in Kittanning, Pa. and pitched for five seasons in the big leagues between 1947 and 1951. A right-handed pitcher, Starr appeared in 93 games, putting together a record of 12-24 and an ERA of 5.25 over 344.2 innings pitched. Starr's professional baseball career took a hiatus when he served in the United States Army during World War II from 1943 to 1945. Starr passed away on Jan. 18, 2017, in Kittanning, Pa.

Walt Streuli was born in Memphis, Tenn. on Sept. 26, 1935. Streuli was a catcher for the Detroit Tigers, making his MLB debut in 1954. He posted a .250 career batting average over the course of three seasons. He passed away on Jan. 19, 2017, in Greensboro, N.C.

Yordano Ventura was born on June 3, 1991, in Samana, Samana, Dominican Republic and played for the Kansas City Royals. Known to fans as "Ace," the starting pitcher appeared in 94 games, notched 38 wins and posted an ERA of 3.89. In 2015, he played an important role in the Kansas City Royals' World Series championship. Ventura passed away on Jan. 22, 2017, in San José de Ocoa, San José de Ocoa, Dominican Republic.

Ken Wright was born on Sept. 4, 1946, in Pensacola, Fla. and pitched for five seasons in the big leagues. A right-handed pitcher, Wright appeared in 113 games, compiling a record of 11-15 and an ERA of 4.54 over 236 innings pitched. Wright's best season was in 1971, when he posted an ERA of 3.69 over 78 innings pitched. Wright passed away on Jan. 21, 2017.

Jose Zardon was born on May 20, 1923, in La Habana, Cuba and appeared in 54 games for the Washington Senators in 1945. A right-handed outfielder, Zardon was a solid hitter, collecting 38 hits in 131 big league at-bats. Zardon passed away on March 21, 2017, in Tamarac, Fla.

2016

Dick Adams was born on April 8, 1920, in Tuolumne, Calif. and made his big league debut on May 20, 1947 for the Philadelphia Athletics. A right-handed hitting first baseman and outfielder, Adams played one season in the Majors, collecting 18 hits in 89 at-bats. In 1945, Adams served as player-manager of the Santa Ana, Calif. Army Air Base baseball team. In addition, Adams was also a musician, leading his own band in the off-season. Adams passed away on Sept. 14, 2016, in Fallbrook, Calif.

Bob Addis was born on Nov. 6, 1925, in Mineral, Ohio and played for four seasons between the Boston Braves, Chicago Cubs and Pittsburgh Pirates. A left-handed hitting outfielder, Addis posted 150 hits in 534 at-bats for a career average of .281. In 1944, Addis joined the Marines and spent time serving in China during World War II. Addis passed away on Nov. 15, 2016.

Dave Adlesh was born on July 15, 1943, in Long Beach, Calif. and was signed as a free agent by the Houston Colt .45's in 1963. A right-handed hitting catcher, Adlesh played for six seasons, all for the Colt .45's. In 106 games and 256 at-bats, Adlesh collected 43 hits and 11 RBI. Adlesh passed away on Feb. 15, 2016, in Long Beach, Calif.

Gail Allie was born on Oct. 28, 1931, in Statesville, N.C. and was signed as a free agent by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1952. A right-handed hitting shortstop and third baseman, Allie made his MLB debut on April 13, 1954 and played for one season on the Pirates. Allie also served in the military from 1953 to 1954, and again in 1957. Although he played just one season, he did appear in 121 games, collecting 83 hits in 418 at-bats. Allie passed away on Oct. 4, 2016, in San Antonio.

Orlando Alvarez was born on Feb. 28, 1952, in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico and signed as a free agent in 1970 with the Los Angeles Dodgers. He played four seasons as a left fielder with the Dodgers and Angels, and was considered to be one of the most feared batters of his Puerto Rico Winter Baseball League. After his retirement, Alvarez stayed active in the game by managing in an amateur baseball league and coaching in the professional circuit. Alvarez passed away on March 31, 2016, in Rio Grande, Puerto Rico.

José Arcia was born on Aug. 22, 1943, in La Habana, Cuba and was signed by the Houston Colt .45's as a free agent in 1962. A right-handed hitting middle infielder, Arcia played for three seasons between the Chicago Cubs and San Diego Padres, appearing in 293 games and clubbing 132 hits in 615 at-bats. An athletic, versatile defensive player, Arcia actually began his professional baseball career as a pitcher. Arcia passed away on July 30, 2016, in Miami.

Steve Arlin was born on Sept. 25, 1945, in Seattle and was drafted by the Philadelphia Phillies in the first round of the 1966 draft. A right-handed pitcher, Arlin spent six seasons in the big leagues, going 34-67 with an ERA of 4.33 and 463 strikeouts in 788.2 innings. Arlin played for the San Diego Padres for parts of five seasons and finished his career with the Cleveland Indians, compiling 32 complete-games during his career. Arlin passed away on Aug. 17, 2016, in San Diego.

Luis Arroyo was born on Feb. 18, 1927, in Penuelas, Puerto Rico. Arroyo, one of the earliest Puerto Rican players in the Major Leagues, pitched for eight seasons, spent between the Yankees, Pirates, Cardinals and Redlegs. Arroyo was inducted into the Latino Baseball Hall of Fame in 2012. Arroyo passed away on Jan. 13, 2016, in Puerto Rico.

Charlie Beamon was born on Dec. 25, 1934, in Oakland, Calif. Beamon spent three years in Major Leagues with the Baltimore Orioles. As a pitcher, Beamon held just a 3.91 ERA while throwing 71.1 innings. Beamon passed away on May 3, 2016, in San Leandro, Calif.

Juan Bell was born on March 29, 1968, in San Pedro de Macoris in the Dominican Republic. A middle-infielder, Bell was signed as a free agent in 1984 by the Los Angeles Dodgers, and went on to spend parts of seven seasons with the Baltimore Orioles, Philadelphia Phillies, Milwaukee Brewers, Montreal Expos and Boston Red Sox. In 836 at-bats, Bell collected 177 hits and put together a slash-line of .212/.284/.298. Bell passed away on Aug. 24, 2016, in Santo Domingo in the Dominican Republic.

Neil Berry was born on Jan. 11, 1922, in Kalamazoo, Mich. As an infielder, Berry spent a total of seven years in the Major Leagues with four teams, which included the Detroit Tigers, St. Louis Browns, Chicago White Sox, and Baltimore Orioles. In 1,087 at-bats, Berry recorded 265 hits, 148 runs scored, and 74 RBI's. At age 94, Berry passed away on Aug. 24, 2016, in Kalamazoo, Mich.

Ralph Branca was born on Jan. 6, 1926, in Mount Vernon, N.Y. and was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1943 as a free agent. On June 12, 1944, Branca made his big league debut, the first of 12 seasons in the Majors. In 322 appearances, Branca made 188 starts, compiling a record of 88-68 to go with a career ERA of 3.79 and 1,484 innings pitched. A three-time All-Star for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Branca is most well-known for giving up the "Shot Heard Round the World" off the bat of Bobby Thomson that clinched the 1951 National League pennant for Thomson and the New York Giants. Branca passed away on Nov. 23, 2016, in Rye, N.Y.

Alan Brice was born on Oct. 1, 1937, in New York and signed as a free agent in 1956 with the Chicago White Sox. A right-handed pitcher, Brice had a short stint in the big leagues with the White Sox, appearing in three games in the 1961 season, going 0-1 with a 0.00 ERA and three strikeouts in 3.1 innings. Brice passed away on July 30, 2016.

Alton "Deacon" Brown was born on April 16, 1925, in Norfolk, Va. Brown, a right-hand pitcher, first played baseball during his time in the service in World War II. Brown played professional baseball for nine years, and made his Major League debut on April 21, 1951, pitching two innings of relief for the Washington Senators. Brown passed away on Jan. 10, 2016, in Virginia Beach, Va.

Mike Brumley was born on July 10, 1938, in Granite, Okla. and was signed in 1957 as a free agent by the Brooklyn Dodgers. A left-handed hitting catcher, Brumley played for three seasons in the Major Leagues, logging 224 games, all with the Washington Senators. In his three years, Brumley slashed .229/.295/.294, collected 151 hits and slugged five homers. Brumley passed away on Aug. 8, 2016, in Grapevine, Texas.

Tom Butters was born on April 8, 1938, in Delaware, Ohio. Butters made his MLB debut with the Pittsburgh Pirates on Sept. 8, 1962 as a right-handed pitcher. During his 1964 season, Butters had a 2.38 ERA in 64.1 innings. After retiring from his MLB career due to an auto accident hindering his pitching, he was the head baseball coach at Duke University until 1970 and later became the athletic director for more than 20 years. Butters passed away on March 31, 2016, in Durham, N.C.

Eddie Carnett was born on Oct. 21, 1916, in Springfield, Mo. and made his Major League debut on April 19, 1941. Primarily an outfielder and first baseman, Carnett made his big league debut on the mound, allowing three earned runs in 1.1 innings. Carnett went on to play for three seasons, logging 530 at-bats and 142 hits in 158 games. In addition, Carnett made several other pitching appearances during his career, making six total appearances on the mound and logging 5.1 innings. Prior to passing away, Carnett was the oldest living Major League Baseball player. Carnett passed away on Nov. 4, 2016, in Ringling, Okla.

Bryan Clutterbuck was born on Dec. 17, 1959, in Detroit and was drafted in the 7th round of the 1981 draft by the Milwaukee Brewers. In two seasons with the Brewers, the right-handed pitcher went 2-6 with a 4.21 ERA and 67 punch outs over 124 innings pitched. Clutterbuck passed away on Aug. 23, 2016, in Milford, Mich.

Choo-Choo Coleman was born on Aug. 25, 1937, in Orlando, Fla. and was signed by the Washington Senators in 1955 as a free agent. Coleman went on to play parts of four seasons in the big leagues with the Philadelphia Phillies and the New York Mets. A left-handed hitting catcher, Coleman hit nine homers and drove in 30 runs in 201 games, collecting 91 hits. Coleman passed away on Aug. 15, 2016, in Orangeburg, S.C.

Kevin "Casey" Collins was born on Aug. 4, 1946, in Springfield, Mass. Collins was signed by the Mets in 1964 and made his debut in New York on Sept. 1, 1965, at shortstop. He spent six years in the majors, roaming the infield for the Mets, Expos and Tigers. While with Montreal, he hit the club's first pinch-hit home run on July 17, 1969, against future Hall of Famer Jim Bunning. Collins retired from the nomadic baseball life to settle his family, and worked for an automotive supply company for more than 20 years. Collins passed away on Feb. 20, 2016, in Naples, Fla.

Marlan Coughtry was born on Sept. 11, 1934, in Hollywood, Calif. and signed with the Boston Red Sox as a free agent in 1954. In two seasons, Coughtry played in 35 games, collecting 10 hits in 54 at-bats. Coughtry was a teammate of Carl Yastrzemski's during the 1960 season. Coughtry passed away on Nov. 8, 2016, in Vancouver, Wash.

Paul Dade was born on Dec. 7, 1951, in Seattle and was a first round pick by the California Angels in the 1970 draft. Making his debut on Sept. 12, 1975, Dade went on to play for six seasons between the California Angels, Cleveland Indians and San Diego Padres. In 439 games, Dade collected 355 hits in 1,313 at-bats, posting a career average of .270. Dade also played in Japan during the 1981 season. Dade passed away on Aug. 25, 2016, in Seattle.

Jim Davenport was born on Aug. 17, 1933, in Siluria, Ala. Davenport spent more than 40 years with the San Francisco Giants as a player, coach, manager and front office executive, spending all 13 seasons of his Major League playing career as a utility infielder for the Giants. Davenport had his best season in 1962, when he won a Gold Glove at third base and played in both All-Star Games. Davenport passed away on Feb. 18, 2016, in Redwood City, Calif.

Joe DeMaestri was born on Dec. 9, 2016, in San Francisco. DeMaestri spent the majority of his 11 year Major League career with the Kansas City Athletics where he became an All-Star shortstop in 1957. In 3,441 at-bats, DeMaestri recorded 813 hits, 49 home runs, and 281 RBI's. At age 87, DeMaestri passed away on Aug. 26, 2016, in San Rafael, Calif.

Joe "Pop" Durham was born on July 31, 1931, in Newport News, Va. Durham was signed out of the Negro American League by the St. Louis Browns in 1953, and spent time in the big leagues during three seasons between 1954 and 1959. In 1955 and 1956, Durham served in the United States Military during the Korean War. Durham was the second African-American to play for the Baltimore Orioles, and the first to hit a home run for the franchise. Durham passed away on April 28, 2016, in Randallstown, Md. and is buried at Garrison Forest Veterans Cemetery in Owings Mills, Md.

Sammy Ellis was born on Feb. 11, 1941, in Youngstown, Ohio and signed as a free agent with the Cincinnati Reds in 1961. Ellis continued his career with the Reds for five years, making the All-Star team in 1965. Later he brought his pitching skills to the Angels and White Sox for two more years. After playing his last game on June 8, 1969, Ellis retired but managed to stay involved in the game of baseball, as a pitching coach for the New York Yankees, Chicago White Sox and Chicago Cubs and a staff member for the Seattle Marlins, Boston Red Sox and Baltimore Orioles. Ellis passed away on May 13, 2016, in Temple Terrace, Fla.

Chico Fernandez was born on March 2, 1932, in Havana. Fernandez played eight seasons at shortstop for the Brooklyn Dodgers, Philadelphia Phillies, Detroit Tigers and New York Mets, and was considered to be one of the best defensive shortstops in the history of the game at the time. In 1957, Fernandez became the first African-American to play for the Philadelphia Phillies. Fernandez passed away on June 11, 2016, in Sunrise, Fla.

José Fernandez was born on July 31, 1992, in Santa Clara, Villa Clara, Cuba and was drafted in the first round of the 2011 draft by the Florida Marlins. An electric young pitcher, Fernandez put up some of the best numbers of any young starting pitcher in baseball history. Playing only four seasons between 2013 and 2016, Fernandez made 76 starts, posting a record of 38-17 and an ERA of 2.58 to compliment 589 strikeouts in only 471.1 innings. A two-time All-Star, Fernandez was the 2013 National League Rookie of the Year after going 12-6 with an ERA of 2.19 and 187 strikeouts in only 172.2 innings. In addition, Fernandez received the 2016 National League Comeback Player of the Year Award. Fernandez passed away on Sept. 25, 2016, in Miami Beach, Fla.

Dave "Boo" Ferriss was born on Dec. 5, 1921, in Shaw, Miss. and was signed as a free agent by the Boston Red Sox in 1942. A right-handed pitcher, Ferriss spent his entire six year career with Boston, going 65-30 in 880 innings and posting an ERA of 3.64. An All-Star in 1946, Ferris won 25 games in 35 starts, including an amazing 26 complete games. That same year, Ferriss shut out the St. Louis Cardinals in Game 3 the World Series, though the Red Sox lost the series in Game 7. Ferriss passed away on Nov. 24, 2016, in Cleveland.

Joe Garagiola was born on Feb. 12, 1926, in St. Louis, Mo. Garagiola played nine seasons as a catcher for the Cardinals, Pirates, Cubs and Giants, putting together a career slash line of .257/.354/.385. The left-handed hitting catcher won a World Series championship with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1946. Garagiola passed away on March 23, 2016, in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Lou Grasmick was born on Sept. 11, 1924, in Baltimore, Md. In his short cup of coffee in the big leagues, the right-handed long-relief pitcher made two appearances for the Philadelphia Phillies, allowing four runs in five innings of work. Grasmick passed away on May 26, 2016, in his birthplace of Baltimore, Md.

Doug Griffin was born on June 4, 1947, in South Gate, Calif. and was drafted by the California Angels in the 21st round of the 1965 draft. In eight seasons in the Majors, Griffin played one season for the Angels and seven for the Boston Red Sox. In 632 games, the second baseman slapped 524 hits, including 70 doubles and seven homers, slashing .245/.299/.299 along the way. Griffin won the AL Gold Glove at second base in 1972, and also served in the U.S. Navy from 1966 to 1968, missing time in the big leagues for his service. Griffin passed away on July 28, 2016, in Clovis, Calif.

Vern Handrahan was born on Nov. 27, 1936, in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada. A right-handed pitcher, Handrahan was signed in 1959 by the Milwaukee Braves and went on to play two seasons in the big leagues with the Kansas City Athletics. Appearing in 34 games, Handrahan posted an ERA of 5.31 in 61 innings of work, while striking out 36. In a 1962 minor league outing, Handrahan struck out 19 batters. Handrahan passed away on Nov. 2, 2016, in Charlottetown, Prince Edward Island, Canada.

Jim Ray Hart was born on Oct. 30, 1941, in Hookerton, N.C. The right-handed hitting shortstop and left fielder had a 12-year career in the Major Leagues, compiling 170 homers and 578 RBI in 1,125 games, making the All-Star game in 1966 with the San Francisco Giants. Hart played most of his career with the Giants, but played his last two seasons for the New York Yankees. Hart passed away on May 19, 2016, in Acampo, Calif.

Phil Hennigan was born on April 10, 1946, in Jasper, Texas and was drafted in the fourth round of the 1966 draft by the Cleveland Indians. In 1967, Hennigan served in the military before returning to baseball. A right-handed pitcher, Hennigan played for five seasons in the Majors and appeared in 176 games, going 17-14 with an ERA of 4.26 and 188 strikeouts over 280.2 innings pitched. In 1971, Hennigan picked up 14 saves for the Cleveland Indians. Hennigan passed away on June 17, 2016, In Center, Texas.

Ron Henry was born on Aug. 7, 1936, in Chester, Pa. The right-handed catcher spent 42 games in the big leagues with the Minnesota Twins, gathering nine hits in 69 at-bats, including two homers and eight runs batted in. Henry passed away on May 14, 2016, in Denver, Colo.

Jim Hickman was born on May 10, 1937, in Henning, Tenn. and signed as a free agent in 1956 with the St. Louis Cardinals. An outfielder and corner infielder, Hickman was an All-Star in 1970 with the Chicago Cubs, hitting 32 homers and driving in 115 runs. In 13 big league seasons, Hickman played for the New York Mets, Los Angeles Dodgers, Cubs and Cardinals. In 1,421 games, Hickman collected 1,002 hits, 159 homers and 560 runs batted in. In his All-Star season in 1970, Hickam also received the National League Comeback Player of the Year Award. Hickman passed away on June 25, 2016, in Jackson, Tenn.

Hal Hudson was born on May 4, 1927, in Grosse Pointe, Mich. Hudson was signed by the St. Louis Browns as an amateur free agent in 1994 as a pitcher. He spend part of the 1952 season with the Browns before being picked up by the Chicago White Sox. Hudson appeared in six games and recorded 4 strikeouts. Hudson passed away at the age of 89 on July 8, 2016, in Port St. Lucie, Fla.

Monte Irvin was born on Feb. 25, 1919, in Haleburg, Ala. Irvin spent nine years in the Negro Leagues, punctuating his baseball career by serving in the Army during World War II. As one of the earliest African-American MLB players, Irvin was a National League All-Star and played majority of his career with the New York Giants, who retired his jersey in 2010. Irvin won a World Series championship with the Giants in 1954. After spending 18 years playing professional baseball, Irvin was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1973 and the Cuban Baseball Hall of Fame in 1997. Irvin passed away on Jan. 11, 2016, in Houston.

Virgil Jester was born on July 23, 1927, in Denver, Colo. The right-handed pitcher spent two seasons in the big leagues between the Boston Braves and the Milwaukee Braves, compiling a 3-5 record and a 3.84 ERA over 21 appearances. Jester passed away on Feb. 15, 2016, in Arvada, Colo.

Joe Kirrene was born on Oct. 4, 1931, in San Francisco and was signed in 1950 by the Chicago White Sox. A third baseman, Kirrene played for two seasons in the show, both with the White Sox. After making his debut in 1950, Kirrene then spent 1951-1953 serving in the Korean War. Upon returning to the game in 1954, Kirrene appeared in nine games for the White Sox, posting a .304 average and a .424 OBP during the 1954 campaign. In his career, Kirrene picked up eight hits in 27 at-bats, driving in four runs and batting .296. Kirrene passed away on Oct. 19, 2016, In San Ramon, Calif.

Steve Korcheck was born on Aug. 11, 1932, in McClellandtown, Pa. Korcheck spent four years in the Major Leagues as a catcher for the Washington Senators. During those four years Korcheck appeared in 58 games and recorded 23 hits. Korcheck passed away on Aug. 26, 2016, in Bradenton, Fla. at age 84.

Steve Kraly was born on April 18, 1929, in Whiting, Ind. The left-handed pitcher had a short stint in the big leagues, appearing in five games for the New York Yankees in 1953, a season in which the Yankees won the World Series. In his five appearances, Kraly compiled 25 innings, a record of 0-2 and a respectable ERA of 3.24. Kraly passed away on March 7, 2016, in Johnson City, N.Y.

Turk Lown was born on May 30, 1924, in Brooklyn, N.Y. and was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as a free agent in 1942. A right-handed pitcher, Lown had a solid career, spending 11 seasons in the big leagues with the Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Redlegs and the Chicago White Sox. In 504 games, Lown went 55-61 with an ERA of 4.12. Lown led the American League in saves in 1959, and led the National League in appearances in 1957. Lown passed away on July 8, 2016, in Pueblo, Colo.

Clyde Mashore was born May 29, 1945, in Concord, Calif. Mashore signed as a free agent with the Cincinnati Reds in 1964 as an outfielder. His five-year career was spent with the Reds and Montreal Expos. Mashore passed away on Jan. 26, 2016, in Brentwood, Calif.

Gordon Massa was born on Sept. 2, 1935, in Cincinnati and was signed by the Chicago Cubs as a free agent in 1957. A left-handed hitting catcher, Massa spent parts of two seasons in the bigs with the Chicago Cubs, going 7-17 and driving in three runs in his eight games. Massa also pitched in 24 games in the minor leagues for the San Antonio Missions. Massa passed away on July 16, 2016.

Dick McAuliffe was born on Nov. 29, 1939, in Hartford, Conn. The left-handed hitting infielder had a long career, playing 1,763 games over 16 seasons for the Detroit Tigers and Boston Red Sox. McAuliffe was selected to the All-Star Game three times in a row from 1965 to 1967 while he was with the Tigers, and won a World Series with Detroit in 1968, a season that McAuliffe led the American League in runs scored. Throughout his career, the versatile infielder posted a slash line of .247/.343/.403, clubbed 197 homers and drove in 696 runs. McAuliffe passed away on May 13, 2016, in Farmington, Conn.

Carl Miles was born on March 22, 1918, in Trenton, Mo. and signed as a free agent in 1940 with the Philadelphia Athletics. A left-handed pitcher, Miles made his big league debut on June 8, 1940. The southpaw made two appearances in his career and logged eight innings of work, striking out six batters. Miles passed away on Sept. 9, 2016, in Lakeland, Fla.

Don Minnick was born on April 14, 1931, in Lynchburg, Va. Minnick was initially signed by the Cleveland Indians in 1949 and then went on to spend one season in the Major Leagues with the Washington Senators in 1957. As a pitcher, Minnick appeared in two games while throwing 9.1 innings and recording 7 strikeouts. On Sept. 2, 2016, Minnick passed away in Rocky Mount, Va.

Steve Nagy was born on May 28, 1919, in Franklin, N.J. and signed as a free agent in 1942 with the Brooklyn Dodgers. Nagy was a left-handed pitcher who spent two seasons in the big leagues with the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Washington Senators. In 15 games, Nagy made 10 starts and went 3-8, with an ERA of 6.42 and 21 strikeouts in 67.1 innings of work. The southpaw passed away on July 24, 2016, in Poulsbo, Wash.

Russ Nixon was born on Feb. 19, 1935, in Cleves, Ohio and was signed in 1953 by the Cleveland Indians. A catcher, Nixon played for 12 seasons between the Indians, Boston Red Sox and Minnesota Twins. In 906 games, Nixon collected 670 hits and 27 homers, while driving in 266 runs and posting a career average of .268. Following his retirement as a player, Nixon spent time managing both the Cincinnati Reds and the Atlanta Braves in the 1980's. Nixon passed away on Nov. 8, 2016, in Cleves, Ohio.

John Orsino was born on April 22, 1938, in Teaneck, N.J. and signed with the New York Giants in 1957 as a free agent. A first baseman and catcher, Orsino played for seven seasons in the big leagues, spending time with the San Francisco Giants, Baltimore Orioles and Washington Senators. In 332 games, Orsino put together 252 hits and 40 homers, driving in 123 runs and posting a career average of .249. On August 23, 1961 while with the San Francisco Giants, Orsino hit the fifth homer in one inning for the club, a Major League record. Orsino passed away on Nov. 1, 2016, in Sunny Isles Beach, Fla.

Milt Pappas was born on May 11, 1939, in Detroit. A right-handed starting pitcher, Pappas had a fantastic career, posting a record of 209-164 and an ERA of 3.40 over 17 seasons and 465 starts. Pappas made the All-Star Game in 1962 and 1965 while he was with the Baltimore Orioles. During the 1972 season with the Chicago Cubs, Pappas threw a no-hitter on Sept. 2, part of a string of 11 straight winnings starts to finish the season. The dominant pitcher led the National League in shutouts in 1971, won at least 15 games in seven seasons, and reached at least 200 innings pitched in nine seasons. Pappas passed away on April 19, 2016, in Beecher, Ill.

Brock Pemberton was born on Nov. 6, 1953, in Tulsa, Okla. Pemberton spent parts of two seasons in the big leagues, playing 13 games for the New York Mets and going 4 for 24. Though the switch-hitting first baseman had a short career, he did have a memorable moment when he got a hit in the 25th inning of a marathon game, claiming to be "the youngest rookie to get a base hit after three-o'clock in the morning." Pemberton passed away on Feb. 17, 2016, in Ardmore, Okla.

Harry Perkowski was born on Sept. 6, 1922, in Dante, Va. A left-handed pitcher, Perkowski spent eight seasons in the Major Leagues, appearing in 184 games and starting 76 of those games. The southpaw put together a career record of 33-40 with the Cincinnati Reds and Chicago Cubs, and posted a career ERA of 4.37 over 697.2 innings of work. Perkowski passed away on April 20, 2016, in Beckley, W.Va.

Lee Pfund was born on Oct. 10, 1919, in Oak Park, Ill. The right-handed pitcher spent one season in the big leagues with the Brooklyn Dodgers, posting a record of 3-2 and an ERA of 5.20 in 15 outings and 62.1 innings of work. Pfund passed away on June 2, 2016, in Carol Stream, Ill.

Tony Phillips was born on April 25, 1959, in Atlanta, Ga. A utility man, Phillips played outfield, second base and third base during a long 18-year career with the Oakland Athletics, Detroit Tigers, California Angels, Chicago White Sox, Toronto Blue Jays and New York Mets. In his long career, Phillips posted a slash line of .266/.374/.389, slugging 160 homers and driving in 819 runs. The consistent journeyman won a World Series championship with the Athletics in 1989, led the American League in walks in 1993 and 1996, and scored 100 runs in four different seasons. Phillips passed away on Feb. 17, 2016, in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Ruben Quevedo was born on Jan. 5, 1979, in Valencia, Venezuela. A right-handed pitcher, Quevedo spent four seasons in the Major Leagues with the Chicago Cubs and Milwaukee Brewers. He made 66 appearances and started 58 games, compiling a record of 14-30 and an ERA of 6.15 over 326.1 innings of work. Quevedo passed away on June 7, 2016, in La Guaira, Venezuela.

Ken Ramos was born on June 6, 1967, in Sidney, Neb. A left-handed outfielder, Ramos debuted on May 16, 1997 and played 14 games for the Houston Astros in his single season in the big leagues. Ramos passed away on May 15, 2016 in Pueblo, Colo.

Robert Ramsay was born on Dec. 3, 1973, in Vancouver, Wash. and was drafted in the seventh round of the 1996 draft by the Boston Red Sox. A left-handed pitcher, Ramsay made 43 appearances in two seasons for the Seattle Mariners, posting a record of 1-3 and an ERA of 4.19 over 68.2 innings. Ramsay passed away on Aug. 4, 2016, in Moscow, Idaho.

Lance Rautzhan was born on Aug. 20, 1952, in Pottsville, Pa. Rautzhan was signed by the Los Angeles Dodgers in the 1970 amateur draft as a pitcher. He spent three seasons in the majors with a 4.35 ERA and 25 saves for Los Angeles. Rautzhan pitched in both the 1977 and 1978 World Series against the New York Yankees. Rautzhan passed away in Myrtle Beach, S.C. on Jan. 9, 2016.

Fred Richards was born on Nov. 3, 1927, in Warren, Ohio. The left-handed first baseman had a short stint in the big leagues, playing 10 games for the Chicago Cubs in 1951, collecting eight hits in 27 at-bats for an average of .296. Richards passed away on March 18, 2016, in his birthplace of Warren, Ohio.

Jay Ritchie was born on Nov. 20, 1936, in Salisbury, N.C. Ritchie spent his four year Major League career with the Braves, Red Sox and Reds as a pitcher. In 1967, while pitching for the Braves, Ritchie threw a perfect game and retired 28 batters. Following his Major League career, Ritchie was a scout for the Braves. Ritchie passed away on Jan. 5, 2016, in Salisbury, N.C.

Mike Sandlock was born on Oct. 17, 1915, in Old Greenwich, Conn. Sandlock spent five seasons in the Major Leagues, appearing in 195 games between the Boston Braves, Brooklyn Dodgers and Pittsburgh Pirates. The switch-hitting Sandlock played catcher, third base and shortstop during his career, and put up a slash line of .240/.304/.305. In the minors, Sandlock was roommates with the great Warren Spahn, and was actually called up at the same time as Spahn in September 1942. The versatile switch-hitter took an intermission to his career to serve in World War II. Sandlock passed away on April 4, 2016, in Cos Cob, Conn.

Charlie Sands was born on Dec. 17, 1947, in Newport Views, Va. and was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the 21st round of the 1965 draft. A left-handed hitting catcher, Sands appeared in 93 games over six seasons, collecting 31 hits and six homers in 145 at-bats. With a strong plate approach, despite notching a career average of .214, Sands retired with a career OBP of .372. In 1971, Sands won a World Series championship with the Pittsburgh Pirates. Sands passed away on Aug. 22, 2016, in Naples, Fla.

Joe Schaffernoth was born on Aug. 6, 1937, in Trenton, N.J. A right-handed pitcher, Schaffernoth appeared in 74 games during three seasons in the big leagues, playing for the Chicago Cubs and the Cleveland Indians. In 118 innings of work, Schaffernoth posted a record of 3-8 and an ERA of 4.58. Schaffernoth passed away on June 18, 2016, in Berkley Heights, N.J.

Bob Spicer was born on April 11, 1925, in Richmond, Va. The right-handed pitcher had a short career, appearing in four games over two seasons and pitching five innings for the Kansas City Athletics. Spicer passed away on Feb. 27, 2016, in Fayetteville, N.C.

Ron Stillwell was born on Dec. 3, 1939, in Los Angeles. Stillwell played as a middle infielder for the Washington Senators during the 1961 and 1962 seasons. Stillwell attended the University of Southern California and was captain of the baseball team during the 1961 College World Series. He later became head baseball coach at Thousand Oaks High School. Stillwell passed away on Jan. 25, 2016.

Mike Strahler was born on March 14, 1947, in Chicago and was signed in 1966 as a free agent by the Philadelphia Phillies. A right-handed pitcher, Strahler spent four seasons in the Major Leagues, playing for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Detroit Tigers between 1970 and 1973. In 53 games, Strahler went 6-8 with an ERA of 3.57 over 158.2 innings. Strahler passed away on July 14, 2016, in Alamogordo, Minn.

Frank Sullivan was born on Jan. 23, 1930, in Hollywood, Calif. and signed as a free agent by the Boston Red Sox in 1948. Sullivan's baseball career was put on hold when he served in the military during the Korean War in 1949 and 1950. Sullivan was a two-time All-Star as well as an American League Wins Leader in 1955 during his 11-year career. Sullivan passed away on Jan. 19, 2016, in Lihue, Hawaii.

Gordie Sundin was born on Oct. 10, 1937, in Minneapolis. A right-handed pitcher, Sundin debuted as an 18-year-old on Sept. 19, 1956 with the Baltimore Orioles. Although Sundin only allowed one run in his career, he had only one outing and did not record an out, making his ERA infinite. Sundin passed away on May 2, 2016, in Naples, Fla.

Ron Theobald was born on July 29, 1943, in Crewe, Va. The right-handed pitcher played one season in the big leagues, appearing in four games for the Minnesota Twins in 1964. Over 6.1 innings of work, Whitby did not record a decision and posted an ERA of 8.53. Whitby passed away on March 12, 2016, in Huntersville, N.C.

Bill Whitby was born on July 28, 1943, in Oakland, Calif. A right-handed hitting second baseman, Theobald played two seasons in the Major Leagues for the Milwaukee Brewers. In his career, Theobald played 251 games, compiling 193 hits in 779 at-bats for a slash line of .248/.342/.290. Theobald passed away on April 15, 2016, in Walnut Creek, Calif.

Walt Williams was born on Dec. 19, 1943, in Bronxwood, Texas. Williams played ten years in the Major Leagues with the White Sox, Yankees, Indians and Colt .45's, his best season coming in 1969 when he bat .304 with 143 hits. After retiring from playing, he served as a coach for the White Sox and managed in the Minor Leagues for the Rangers organization. Williams passed away on Jan. 23, 2016, in Abilene, Texas.

John Young was born on Feb. 9, 1949, in Los Angeles, Calif. The left-handed first baseman appeared in two games in the big leagues for the Detroit Tigers in 1971. In his four lone MLB plate appearances, Young knocked two hits, including a double. Young passed away on May 8, 2016, in Los Angeles, Calif.

2015

Bob Anderson was born Sept. 29, 1935, in East Chicago, Ind. Signed by the Cubs in 1954 as an amateur free agent, Anderson made his debut on July 31, 1957, and spent the next six seasons with Chicago. For his final season, Anderson was a right-handed pitcher for the Detroit Tigers. Anderson passed away on March 12, 2015, in Tulsa, Okla.

Joaquin Andujar was born Dec. 21, 1952, in San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic. He was signed by the Cincinnati Reds as an amateur free agent in 1969 and went on to make his debut on April 8, 1976, with the Astros. Over his 13-year career, Andujar played for the Astros, Cardinals and Athletics and had his best season in 1984, when he lead the National League with 20 wins and four shutouts. Andujar earned All-Star honors four times throughout his career, was named a Gold Glove Award winner in 1984 and won a World Series with St. Louis in 1982. Andujar passed away on Sept. 8, 2015, in San Pedro de Macoris.

Rinaldo "Rugger" Ardizoia was born on Nov. 20, 1919, in Novara, Italy. Ardizoia spent 12 years in the Minor Leagues, mainly in the Pacific Coast League, and only one year in the Majors, for the New York Yankees, making his debut on April 30, 1947. During his time in professional baseball, Ardizoia took a hiatus to serve in the Air Force during World War II. Ardizoia passed away on July 19, 2015, in San Francisco.

Earl Averill Jr. was born on Sept. 9, 1931, in Cleveland. After spending his college career with the University of Oregon and earning All-American accolades, Averill was signed by the Cleveland Indians. The son of Baseball Hall of Famer and his namesake, Earl Averill Sr., Averill Jr. made his debut on April 19, 1956, as the starting Catcher for the Tribe. Spending seven years in the Majors, Averill played for the Indians, Cubs, White Sox, Angels and Phillies. Averill passed away on May 13, 2015, in Tacoma, Wash.

Ernie Banks was born on Jan. 31, 1931, in Dallas. The Hall of Fame shortstop and first baseman got his start in baseball with the Negro League's Kansas City Monarchs, before being drafted into the Army in 1951. Upon returning from his service in Europe, Banks played the majority of the 1953 season with the Monarchs before signing with the Cubs on Sept. 8, 1953. Nine days later, Banks made his debut for Chicago, never having played in the Minors. Banks spent the entirety of his 19-year career with the Cubs, spending equal time at first base and shortstop. An 11-time All-Star, two-time National League MVP and Gold Glove winner, Banks was known for his cheery disposition and love of baseball, famously saying, "Let's play two!" After retiring from his playing career, Banks served as a team ambassador for the Cubs. Elected to the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1977, Banks had his jersey retired by the Cubs in 1982, the first player to ever have his number retired by the team. Banks passed away on Jan. 23, 2015, in Chicago.

Dick Barone was born Oct. 13, 1932 in San Jose, Calif. Barone made his debut Sept. 22, 1960 as a pinch runner for the Pirates, who had already clinched the National League pennant in that year. Barone served his country in the Korean War, and spent ten seasons in the minors. He passed away on April 23, 2015 in Hollister, Calif.

Dave Bergman was born on June 6, 1953, in Evanston, Ill. Bergman was drafted in the 12th round of the 1971 First-Year Player Draft by the Cubs but forewent the opportunity to play for Chicago and attended Illinois State University instead. After spending three years with the Redbirds, Bergman was drafted in the second round of the 1974 Draft by the Yankees and made his Major League debut on Aug. 26, 1975. In his 17-year career, Bergman played for the Yankees, Astros, Giants and Tigers, winning a World Series with Detroit in 1984. Bergman passed away on Feb. 2, 2015, in Grosse Pointe, Mich.

Lawrence "Yogi" Berra was born May 12, 1925 in St. Louis. The 15-time All-star and three-time American League MVP was signed by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1943, and spent only two years in the minors, punctuated by three years of military service during World War II. Making his debut on Sept. 22, 1946 at catcher, Berra went on to spend the entirety of his 19-year career with the Yankees. Berra still holds the record for most World Series won by any player, with 10. After retiring from playing, Berra held managerial positions with both the Mets and Yankees. Berra was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 1972. He passed away on Sept. 22, 2015 in West Caldwell, N.J.

Fred Besana was born April 5, 1930 in Lincoln, Calif. Besana played in the Minor Leagues for about a decade and briefly pitched in the majors for the Baltimore Orioles. He made two career starts with the Orioles, and appeared in seven games with a 5.60 ERA. Following his baseball career, Besana went on to earn his Master's degree in physical education and later became a Physical Education teacher. Besana passed away Nov. 7, 2015 in Roseville, Calif.

Everett "Rocky" Bridges was born on Aug. 7, 1927, in Refugio, Texas. Bridges signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947 and made his Major League debut on April 17, 1951, as the Dodgers' Opening Day starting third baseman. Bridges spent 11 years playing in the Majors, for the Dodgers, Reds, Senators, Tigers, Indians, Cardinals and Angels. Following his playing days, Bridges was a Minor League manager for 21 years and also coached for the Angels and Giants. Bridges passed away on Jan. 28, 2015, in Coeur d'Alene, Idaho.

Hal Brown was born Dec. 11, 1924 in Greensboro, N.C. Brown was drafted in 1943 by the United States Air Force and served 32 months in the military during World War II. Following his return home, the Boston Red Sox signed him as an amateur free agent in 1946. During his 14-year career, Brown played for the Red Sox, White Sox, Orioles and Yankees. He finished his Major League career with a 3.81 ERA. Brown passed away on Dec. 17, 2015 in his hometown of Greensboro at the age of 91.

Ollie Brown was born Feb. 11, 1944, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. Signed by the San Francisco Giants in 1962, Brown made his debut as an outfielder on Sept. 10, 1965. After four seasons with the Giants, he was the first pick of the 1968 expansion draft by the San Diego Padres. In his 13-year career, Brown also spent time with the Phillies, Brewers, Astros and Athletics. Brown passed away on April 16, 2015, in Buena Park, Calif.

Don Bryant was born on July 13, 1941, in Jasper, Fla. Bryant was signed by the Detroit Tigers in 1959 and made his debut on July 17, 1966, with the Chicago Cubs as a catcher. During his three-year career, Bryant played with the Cubs and Astros. After retiring from playing, Bryant spent time as a coach with both the Boston Red Sox and Seattle Mariners. Bryant passed away on Jan. 22, 2015, in Gainesville, Fla.

George Burpo was born June 19, 1922 in Jenkins, Ky. Burpo began his baseball career at the age of 17 in 1939. He took three years off during his baseball career to serve in the Navy during World War II, and returned back to baseball shortly thereafter. He played two games with the Cincinnati Reds in 1946. Burpo passed away on Dec. 20, 2015 in Tucson, Ariz.

Jose Capellan was born Jan. 13, 1981, in Cotui, Dominican Republic. Capellan was signed by the Braves as an amateur free agent in 1998 and made his debut as a starting pitcher with Atlanta on Sept. 12, 2004. During his five-year career, Capellan played for the Braves, Rockies, Brewers and Tigers. Capellan passed away on April 7, 2015, in Philadelphia.

Carmelo Castillo was born June 8, 1958 in San Pedro de Macoris, Dominican Republic. Castillo was signed by the Phillies as an amateur free agent in 1978. He later became a back-up outfielder for the Cleveland Indians and the Minnesota Twins from 1982 to 1991. Following his playing career, he became the manager of the Dominican Summer League Rangers. Castillo passed away Nov. 15, 2015 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic.

Dean Chance was born June 1, 1941 in Wooster, Ohio. The 1964 Cy Young Award winner, Chance signed with the Baltimore Orioles as an amateur free agent in 1959. Chance made his Major League debut with the Angels in 1961, and became part of the regular rotation roster in 1962. He played with the Angels until 1966 when he was traded to the Minnesota Twins. He continued his 11-year career with the Indians, Mets, and Tigers. He was known as a "power pitcher," ending his career with a 2.92 ERA. Chance was a two time All-Star and an American League Shutouts Leader in 1964. Chance passed away Oct. 11, 2015 in Wooster.

Harold "Doc" Daugherty was born Oct. 12, 1927, in Paris, Penn. Daugherty served in the United States Army before enrolling at Ohio State University, where he was a member of the Buckeyes football squad. He signed with Detroit as a free agent in 1948 and made his debut on April 22, 1951, as a pinch hitter. Following his call-up in 1951, Daugherty spent two more years in the Tigers' Minor League system before retiring to become a high school teacher and football coach. Daugherty also managed in the Tigers organization following his retirement from the Majors. Daugherty passed away on Aug. 15, 2015, in Downingtown, Penn.

Ramon de los Santos was born Jan. 19, 1949 in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. Santos was signed as a free agent to the Houston Astros in 1972. Santos pitched 12 games during his Major League career with the Astros in 1974 for an ERA of 2.19. After his career, he became a scout for the Seattle Mariners. Santos passed away Nov. 29, 2015 in Santo Domingo.

Carlos Diaz was born Jan. 7, 1958 in Kaneohe, Hawaii. Diaz was drafted in the 1979 amateur draft by the Seattle Mariners and made his Major League debut in 1982. During his five-year career, Diaz played for the Dodgers, Mets and Braves. Diaz passed away Sept. 28, 2015 in Honolulu.

Kerry Dineen was born July 1, 1952 in Englewood, N.J. Dineen set a school record for career batting average, hitting .409 at the University of San Diego. Dineen was drafted in the 1973 amateur draft by the New York Yankees. During his three-year career, Dineen also played for the Phillies as an outfielder. Dineen passed away Nov. 21, 2015 in Henderson, Nev.

Larry Eschen was born Sept. 22, 1920, in Suffern, N.Y. Eschen made his debut for the Philadelphia Athletics on June 16, 1942, at shortstop. After spending the 1942 season with the Athletics, Eschen went on to serve in the U.S. Army during World War II. Eschen passed away on June 9, 2015, in Gainsville, Ga.

Bobby Etheridge was born Nov. 25, 1942 in Greenville, Miss. Etheridge was signed by the San Francisco Giants as an amateur free agent in 1964. Etheridge's two-year baseball career was solely with the Giants. He made his Major League debut on July 16, 1967 against the Cubs. Etheridge passed away on Sept. 19, 2015 in Rolling Fork, Miss.

Jim Fanning was born on Sept. 14, 1927, in Chicago. After serving in the Army during World War II and earning his physical education degree from Buena Vista College, Fanning went on to sign with the Chicago Cubs as a free agent in 1949. Making his debut as a catcher on Sept. 11, 1954, Fanning then spent the rest of his four seasons in Major League Baseball with the Cubs. Though Fanning retired from playing in 1958, he continued to work as a manager in the Minor Leagues before becoming the Montreal Expos' first general manager in 1969. Fanning spent three seasons as the Expos manager, including the 1981 season in which Toronto made its only postseason appearance. Fanning passed away on April 25, 2015, in London, Ontario, Canada.

George Genovese was born Feb. 22, 1922 in Staten Island, N.Y. In 1942, Genovese was drafted into the Army Air Force, and eventually sent to the Pacific where he was stationed at Okinawa. Genovese was discharged in March 1946, and returned to baseball. He made his Major League debut in 1950 for the Washington Senators. Genovese passed away on Nov. 15, 2015 in Burbank, Calif.

Gus Gil was born April 19, 1939 in Caracas, Venezuela. Gil played four years in the Major Leagues as an infielder. Gil was signed as an amateur free agent in 1959 by the Cincinnati Reds. Soon after he was acquired by the Cleveland Indians, he had his Major League debut in 1967. Once Gil retired, he managed four years in the minors for the Angels and Orioles farm systems. Gil passed away Dec. 8, 2015 in Phoenix.

Fred Gladding was born June 28, 1936, in Flat Rock, Mich. Signed by the Detroit Tigers in 1956, Gladding made his debut on July 1, 1961, pitching two innings of relief. After seven seasons with the Tigers, Gladding spent the remainder of his 13-year career in Houston. His best season in the Majors came in 1969, when he led the National League in saves with 29. After his playing career ended, Gladding coached in the Minor League systems of the Tigers, Astros and Indians. Gladding passed away on May 21, 2015, in Columbia, S.C.

Darryl Hamilton was born Dec. 3, 1964, in Baton Rouge, La. After attending Nichols State University, Hamilton was taken in the 11th round of the 1986 First-Year Player Draft by the Milwaukee Brewers. Making his debut in center field on June 3, 1988, for Milwaukee, Hamilton went on to spend seven seasons with the Brewers before playing for the Mets, Rockies, Giants and Rangers during his 13-year career. Following his retirement from playing, Hamilton worked for the Commissioner's Office of Major League Baseball, worked with MLB Advanced Media and was an analyst for MLB Network. Hamilton passed away on June 21, 2015, in Pearland, Texas.

Garry Hancock was born Jan. 23, 1954 in Tampa, Fla. Hancock was drafted by the Texas Rangers in the 1972 amateur draft, but opted to attend the University of South Carolina instead, leading his team to the 1975 College World Series. After four years with the Gamecocks, he was drafted in the first round by the Cleveland Indians in 1976, then traded to the Boston Red Sox in 1977. Following the 1982 campaign, Hancock was traded to the Athletics where he finished his career. Hancock passed away Oct. 10, 2015 in Valrico, Fla.

Tommy Hanson was born Aug. 18, 1986 in Tulsa, Okla. Hanson was drafted by the Atlanta Braves in 2005 and made his Major League debut in 2009 with the Atlanta Braves. He was traded to the Los Angeles Angels in 2013 where he ended his Major League career. Hanson passed away on Nov. 10, 2015 in Atlanta, surrounded by friends, family and former teammates.

Ray Hathaway was born on Oct. 13, 1916, in Greenville, Ohio. Hathaway made his debut in Brooklyn on April 20, 1945, as a relief pitcher. After spending the 1945 season with the Dodgers, Hathaway went on to manage for more than 25 years in the Minor Leagues for the Dodgers, Pirates, Cardinals and Indians organizations. Hathaway passed away on Feb. 11, 2015, in Asheville, N.C.

Dave Henderson was born July 21, 1958 in Merced, Calif. Henderson played 14 seasons in the Major Leagues, hitting 197 home runs. Henderson was an American League All-Star and won a World Series with the Oakland Athletics in 1989. He played for the Athletics, Mariners, Red Sox and Royals, before ending his playing career with the Giants in 1994. Henderson passed away on Dec. 27, 2015 in Seattle.

Evelio Hernandez was born Dec. 24, 1931 in Guanabacoa, Cuba. Hernandez spent 11 years in the Minor Leagues appearing 370 times over the course of his career. He had a 61-39 record with a 4.04 ERA. Hernandez had his Major League debut in 1956 with the Washington Senators. After his playing career, Hernandez coached at Loyola High School. Hernandez passed away on Dec. 18, 2015 in Miami.

Harley Hisner was born Nov. 6, 1926, in Maples, Ind. Hisner signed as an amateur free agent in 1947 with the Boston Red Sox. He made his debut as a right-handed pitcher on Sept. 30, 1951. After retiring from baseball, Hisner returned to Indiana and became a machinist. Hisner passed away on March 20, 2015, in Fort Wayne, Ind.

Riccardo Ingram was born Sept. 10, 1966, in Douglas, Ga. Ingram played both football and baseball at Georgia Tech before being drafted in the fourth round of the 1987 First-Year Player Draft by the Detroit Tigers. Ingram made his debut as a pinch runner on June 26, 1994. He spent two seasons in the Majors as a left fielder with the Tigers and the Twins before moving on to retirement as a coach in the Twins organization. Ingram passed away on March 31, 2015, in Lilburn, Ga.

Hank Izquierdo was born March 20, 1931, in Matanzas, Cuba. Taking an nontraditional route to the Major Leagues, Izquierdo played five years in the International League before retiring and becoming the Cleveland Indians' bullpen coach. A year removed from playing, Izquierdo decided to make a comeback, working up from Single-A in the Twins organization to make his debut on Aug. 9, 1967. Izquierdo spent the 1967 season with Minnesota before retiring from playing to manage in the Mexican League. Izquierdo also spent 10 years as a scout for the Twins and Cubs. Izquierdo passed away on Aug. 1, 2015, in West Palm Beach, Fla.

Alex Johnson was born on Dec. 7, 1942, in Helena, Ark. After attending the Detroit Institute of Technology, Johnson signed with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1961 and made his debut on July 25, 1964, as an outfielder. After spending two years with the Phillies, Johnson was traded to the St. Louis Cardinals, where he was part of the World Series-winning 1967 team. 1970 was by far Johnson's best season, as he earned American League All-Star accolades and took home the American League batting championship with an average of .329. In his 13-year career, Johnson played with the Phillies, Cardinals, Rangers, Reds, Angels, Yankees, Indians and Tigers. Johnson passed away on Feb. 28, 2015, in Detroit.

Don Johnson was born on Nov. 12, 1926, in Portland, Ore. After signing with the Yankees in 1944 at just 16, Johnson spent two years in the military during World War II. Johnson made his Major League debut for the New York Yankees on April 20, 1947, winning his first decision as a right-handed pitcher. Spending seven years in the Majors, he played for the Yankees, St. Louis Browns, Washington Senators, Chicago White Sox, Baltimore Orioles and San Francisco Giants. Johnson passed away on Feb. 10, 2015, in Portland.

Ken Johnson was born June 16, 1933 in West Palm Beach, Fla. Johnson was signed as an amateur free agent in 1952, and had a 13-year baseball career playing for the Braves, Colt .45's, Athletics, Reds and Yankees. He made an appearance pitching in the 1961 World Series for the Cincinnati Reds. After his playing career ended, he began coaching for Louisiana College. Johnson passed away on Nov. 21, 2015 in Pineville, La.

Everett "Skeeter" Kell was born Oct. 11, 1929, in Swifton, Ark. The brother of Hall of Famer George Kell, Skeeter was signed out of the University of Arkansas in 1949 by the Philadelphia Athletics. Kell made his debut with Philadelphia on April 19, 1952, as a second baseman and spent the rest of the year with the Athletics before finishing his career in the Minors. After baseball, he opened a successful sporting goods store in Kennett, Mo. Kell passed away on May 28, 2015, in Newport, Ark.

Tom Kelley was born Jan. 5, 1944 in Manchester, Conn. Kelley was signed by the Cleveland Indians in 1963 as a free agent. He pitched for the Indians for four seasons, and in 1971 went to the Atlanta Braves where he was brought up from the minors to pitch his best season - ending with a 2.96 ERA. Kelley passed away on Sept. 25, 2015 in Myrtle Beach, S.C.

Jim King was born on Aug. 27, 1932, in Elkins, Ark. King made his debut on April 17, 1955, spending the majority of the season as the Cubs' starting right fielder. King spent 11 years in the Majors, mostly for the Washington Senators, but also played for the Chicago Cubs, St. Louis Cardinals, San Francisco Giants, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. King passed away on Feb. 23, 2015, in Fayetteville, Ark.

Nick Koback was born on July 19, 1935, in Hartford, Conn. Signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1953, Koback made his debut on July 29 of that same year, only 10 days after his 18th birthday. Koback spent three years in the Majors with the Pirates, and six seasons in the Minors before retirement. Koback passed away on Jan. 23, 2015, in Hartford.

Alan Koch was born on March 25, 1938 in Decatur, Ala. Koch attended Auburn University and was drafted in as a free agent in 1960 by the Detroit Tigers. Koch played in the Major Leagues for two seasons pitching in a total of 42 games. He made his pitching debut on July 26, 1963 for the Tigers. Koch passed away on May 22, 2015 in Prattville, Ala.

Everett "Buddy" Lively was born Feb. 14, 1925, in Birmingham. Ala. The son of Detroit Tigers pitcher Jack Lively, Everett was signed by the Cincinnati Reds in 1942. After two years in the Minor Leagues, Lively served General Patton's Third Army as a member of the anti-aircraft battalion. Upon returning from World War II, Lively made his Major League debut April 17, 1947, as the starting pitcher for the Reds. Spending three years in the big leagues with the Reds, Lively suffered a shoulder injury requiring surgery and never returned to the Major League level. Lively retired from baseball and went on to work for NASA. Lively passed away on July 12, 2015, in Huntsville, Ala.

Chuck Locke was born on May 5, 1932, in Malden, Mo. Locke signed with the St. Louis Browns in 1950 and spent time in the Minors before making his debut on Sept. 16, 1955. Locke only pitched three innings of relief in his two Major League outings, but allowed no runs or hits. Locke passed away on Jan. 9, 2015, in Poplar Bluff, Mo.

Frank Malzone was born on Feb. 28, 1930 in Bronx, N.Y. Malzone played 12 years in the Major Leagues, primarily with the Boston Red Sox. Malzone was a six-time All-Star and three-time Gold Glove winner. He signed with the Red Sox straight out of high school. During his baseball career, he missed the 1952 and 1953 campaigns due to his military service during the Korean War. Malzone ended his career and began working as a scout and Spring Training instructor for the Red Sox. Malzone passed away on Dec. 29, 2015 in Needham, Mass.

Bob Martyn was born on Aug. 15, 1930 in Weiser, Idaho. Martyn was signed by the New York Yankees in 1952. He spent two years in military service starting 1953, and returned to baseball after he was discharged. Martyn played the 1957 and 1958 seasons with the Kansas City Athletics in right field. Martyn passed away on Dec. 2, 2015 in Pacific City, Ore.

Len Matarazzo was born Sept. 12, 1928, in New Castle, Pa. Before starting his Major League career, Matarazzo served in the United States Navy. Originally signed by the Chicago White Sox in 1948, Matarazzo was acquired by the Philadelphia Athletics before the 1949 season. In the 1952 season, Matarazzo went 22-8 with a 2.21 ERA for the Fayetteville Athletics, earning him Carolina League MVP honors and a September call-up to the Philadelphia Athletics. The 1952 season was his only one in the Majors, and he ended his career at the age of 25 due to injury. He went on to become a railway engineer for the Long Island Railroad. Matarazzo passed away on June 19, 2015, in New Castle.

Ed Mayer was born Nov. 30, 1931 in San Francisco. Mayer played eight years in the Minor Leagues then two years in the majors for the Chicago Cubs as a left-handed pitcher. Mayer passed away on Dec. 29, 2015 in Corte Madera, Calif.

Jim McAnany was born Sept. 4, 1936 in Los Angeles. McAnany was signed as an 18-year-old free agent by the Chicago White Sox before the 1955 season. After McAnany retired, he pursued a career in the insurance business in Culver City, Calif. McAnany passed away on Dec. 16, 2015 in Simi Valley, Calif.

Jeff McKnight was born on Feb. 18, 1963, in Conway, Ark. McKnight was a second-round draft pick in 1983 by the New York Mets, out of the University of Arkansas, Fort Smith. He made his debut on June 6, 1989, with the Mets as a pinch hitter. After his debut, McKnight spent two years with the Orioles before returning to the Mets for the rest of his six-year career. McKnight passed away on March 1, 2015, in Bee Branch, Ark.

Lennie Merullo was born May 5, 1917, in Boston. After playing at Villanova University, Merullo signed with the Cubs, spending the entirety of his seven-year career in Chicago. Merullo made his debut at shortstop on Sept. 12, 1941. Following his playing career, Merullo became a scout, spending more than 50 years scouting for the Cubs and the Major League Baseball Scouting Bureau. Merullo passed away on May 30, 2015, in Reading, Mass.

Stu Miller was born on Dec. 26, 1927, in Northampton, Mass. Miller spent his 16-year career with the Giants, Orioles, Cardinals, Braves and Phillies, starting with his debut on Aug. 12, 1952, as the starting pitcher for St. Louis. Miller twice won the Reliever of the Year Award, in 1961 and 1963, and was named a National League All-Star during the 1961 season. He earned a World Series ring while with the Orioles in 1966. Miller passed away on Jan. 4, 2015, in Cameron Park, Calif.

Dick Mills was born Jan. 29, 1945, in Boston. Drafted by the Red Sox in the third round of the 1966 First-Year Player Draft, Mills made his debut on Sept. 7, 1970, as a right-handed relief pitcher in the second game of a doubleheader. Mills passed away on March 28, 2015, in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Eddie Milner was born on May 21, 1955 in Columbus, Ohio. He was drafted in the 1976 amateur draft by the Reds. Milner acquired the nickname "Greyhound" for his speed, and played parts of nine different Major League seasons primarily with the Cincinnati Reds. Milner passed away on Nov. 2, 2015 in Cincinnati.

Minnie Minoso was born on Nov. 29, 1925, in La Habana, Cuba. After getting his baseball start in the Negro Leagues for the New York Cubans, Minoso was signed by the Cleveland Indians in 1948. Making his debut on April 19, 1949, Minoso only spent nine games in the big leagues before playing in Triple-A for the rest of the season. Traded to the White Sox at the beginning of the 1951 season, Minoso had a breakout rookie season in the outfield and at third base for Chicago. In 17 seasons in the Majors, Minoso played the majority of his time with the White Sox, but also spent time with the Indians, Cardinals and Senators. Minoso is one of only two Major League players to have played in a game in five different decades and still holds the record as the third-oldest player ever to bat in a Major League game, at 54 years old. Minoso was a member of the inaugural class of the Latino Baseball Hall of Fame in 2010. Minoso passed away on March 1, 2015, in Chicago.

Bill Monbouquette was born on Aug. 11, 1936, in Medford, Mass. Monbouquette was signed by the Boston Red Sox in 1955 and made his debut on July 18, 1958, spending the majority of his 11-year career with them. A three-time American League All-Star, Monbouquette pitched one 20-win season while with the Red Sox, in 1963. After his playing career, he was a pitching coach with the Mets and was inducted into the Red Sox Hall of Fame in 2000. Monbouquette passed away on Jan. 25, 2015, in Boston.

Alex Monchak was born on Dec. 22, 1919 in Bayonne, N.J. Monchak played professional baseball from 1937 to 1957 but spent two seasons of his career in military service. Monchak was one of the few who acted as a player/manager in the Minor Leagues from 1949 through 1956. After Monchak's playing career ended, he acted as a scout for the California Angels from 1962 to 1970. He later coached for the Oakland Athletics, Chicago White Sox, Pittsburgh Pirate and Atlanta Braves. Monchak passed away on Sept. 12, 2015 in Bradenton, Fla.

Bobby Moore was born Nov. 8, 1958, in Jena, La. Moore was drafted by the Athletics in the 11th round of the 1976 First-Year Player Draft and made it to "The Show" on Sept. 11, 1985, pitching in relief for the San Francisco Giants. Moore passed away on April 10, 2015, in Pensacola, Fla.

Andres Mora was born on May 25, 1955, in Rio Bravo, Mexico. Mora began playing professional baseball at 16 years old for the Mexican League Zacatecas. In 1973, at 18, Mora was signed by the Montreal Expos, but his tenure with the team was brief and he returned to Mexico to play for the Saltillo Saraperos. In 1976, Mora returned after being signed by the Baltimore Orioles and made his Major League debut on April 13, 1976, as the starting designated hitter. Mora spent three seasons with the Orioles before moving on and spending his last season with the Cleveland Indians. Following his retirement, Mora returned to Mexico and managed in the Mexican League for 10 seasons. Mora passed away on June 12, 2015, in Saltillo, Mexico.

Cal Neeman was born on Feb. 18, 1929 in Valmeyer, Ill. Neeman was signed as an amateur free agent by the Yankees in 1949 as a catcher. He was called up by the military to serve during the Korean War which interrupted his baseball career, but he returned in time for the 1953 season. He had a great seven-year career behind the plate during which he played for the Cubs, Phillies, Pirates, Senators and Indians. Neeman worked as a railroad switchman and ran a health food store after his baseball career. Neeman passed away on Oct. 1, 2015 in Lake St. Louis, Mo.

Jim O'Toole was born on Jan. 10, 1937 in Chicago. Pitcher O'Toole won a 98 games over his 12-year Major League career. O'Toole's career was highlighted when he was named the starting pitcher in the 1963 All-Star game. He won 17 games in both the 1963 and 1964 seasons. O'Toole passed away on Dec. 26, 2015 in Cincinnati.

Billy Pierce was born April 2, 1927, in Detroit. Pierce was signed by the Tigers in 1945 and made his debut that year. Pierce spent 18 years in the Majors, the majority being with the White Sox in addition to time with the Tigers and Giants. In 1955, Pierce led the American League in ERA at 1.97. A seven-time All-Star during his career, Pierce pitched four one-hitters and compiled 211 wins. Pierce passed away on July 31, 2015, in Palos Heights, Ill.

Al Rosen was born Feb. 29, 1924, in Spartanburg, S.C. Rosen was signed by the Cleveland Indians in 1942 but continued to further his education in the offseason, attending the University of Miami and playing football there. Before making it to the Majors, Rosen served in the Navy during World War II. Returning to baseball after his discharge, Rosen made his debut Sept. 10, 1947. He spent the entirety of his 10-year career with the Indians, peaking in 1953 when he led the league in runs, home runs and RBIs and earned American League MVP honors. Rosen won a World Series with the Indians in 1948 and was a four-time All-Star. Following his playing career, Rosen left baseball to work in finance, but he returned to serve as president of the New York Yankees in 1978. He then became the general manager of the Houston Astros and held the same post for the San Francisco Giants. In 1987, the Sporting News named him Executive of the Year. Rosen passed away on March 13, 2015, in Rancho Mirage, Calif.

Willie Royster was born on April 11, 1954 in Clarksville, Va. Royster was drafted in the 1972 amateur draft. Catcher Royster found himself between the Pittsburgh Pirates and the Baltimore Orioles, and had his best season in 1981 in the minors under the Orioles organization where he set club records in Double A Charlotte with 31 homeruns, 88 RBI and 53 stolen bases. Royster served as a member of the Major League Baseball Players Alumni Association Board of Directors until his death. Royster passed away on Nov. 23, 2015 in Ocean View, N.J.

Hal Schacker was born on April 6, 1925 in Brooklyn, N.Y. Before starting his career in earnest, Shacker served in World War II. Upon his return, Schacker played six games during the 1945 season for the Boston Braves as a pitcher. Schacker passed away on Oct. 2, 2015 in Tampa, Fla.

Barney Schultz was born on Aug. 15, 1926 in Beverly, N.J. Schultz made his Major League debut in 1955 as a relief pitcher for St. Louis. A highlight of his career, Schultz won a World Series with the Cardinals. After his career ended, Schultz became a pitching instructor for the Cardinals Minor League system before moving to the Major League team. Schultz passed away on Sept. 6, 2015 in Willingboro, N.J.

Kal Segrist was born April 14, 1931, in Greenville, Texas. Before transitioning to the Majors, Segrist helped his college team, University of Texas at Austin, to two national championships. Segrist was signed by the New York Yankees in 1951 and made his debut on July 16, 1952, starting at second base. He also spent time with Baltimore during his career. Segrist passed away on June 26, 2015, in Lubbock, Texas.

Al Severinsen was born on Nov. 9, 1944, in Brooklyn, N.Y. Severinsen attended Wagner College before signing with the Cubs as a right-handed pitcher in 1963. He made his Major League debut on July 1, 1969, for the Baltimore Orioles, spending the rest of the season there before playing his final two seasons with the San Diego Padres. Severinsen passed away on Jan. 27, 2015, in Mystic, Conn.

Steve Shea was born Dec. 5, 1942, in Worcester, Mass. Signed by the Chicago Cubs in 1961, Shea spent a few years in the Cubs organization before moving to the Houston Astros. Shea made his debut July 14, 1968, as a right-handed relief pitcher, earning the win over the Reds. The next season, Shea played for the Montreal Expos. After retiring, Shea earned an MBA from Boston College and went into finance. Shea passed away on March 4, 2015, in North Hampton, N.H.

Neill Sheridan was born on Nov. 20, 1921 in Sacramento, Calif. Sheridan spent one season in the Major Leagues and 12 seasons in the Minor Leagues. Sheridan had four seasons in the Minor League where he was bat over .300. His baseball career was spent mainly in the Pacific Coast League. Sheridan passed away on Oct. 15, 2015 in Antioch, Calif.

Norm Siebern was born on July 26, 1933 in St. Louis. Siebern spent 12 years in the Major Leagues, hitting .272 with 130 home runs. Siebern was a three-time All-Star and also won a Gold Glove in 1958. Siebern won two World Series with the Yankees, in 1956 and 1958. His career was spent playing for the Athletics, Yankees, Orioles, Angels and Red Sox. Siebern passed away on Oct. 30, 2015 in Naples, Fla.

Bill Slayback was born Feb. 21, 1948, in Hollywood, Calif. Drafted out of California State University Northridge by the Tigers in the seventh round of the 1968 First-Year Player Draft, Slayback made his debut June 26, 1972. In his debut, Slayback went 8 1.3 innings with an ERA of 2.16 and five strikeouts, earning the win. He spent three years with the Tigers before retiring and becoming a pharmaceutical salesman. Slayback also co-wrote and performed in 1973 the song "Move Over Babe (Here Comes Henry)," about Hank Aaron's pursuit of the home run record. Slayback passed away on March 25, 2015, in Los Angeles.

Jack Spring was born March 11, 1933, in Spokane, Wash. Spring attended Gonzaga University and Washington State University before making his debut on April 16, 1955, with the Phillies. Spring spent his eight-year career as a left-handed pitcher with the Phillies, Red Sox, Senators, Angels, Cubs, Cardinals and Indians. Following his baseball career, Spring became a high school teacher, coach and athletic director. Spring passed away on Aug. 2, 2015, in Spokane.

Jim Stump was born on Feb. 10, 1932 in Lansing, Mich. As a pitcher, Stump spent two seasons in the Major Leagues. In 1957 he was called up by the Detroit Tigers to make his Major League debut, in which he posted a 2.03 ERA in six appearances. He played in the Minor Leagues from 1959 to 1961 and retired soon after due to shoulder injury. Stump passed away on Nov. 19, 2015 in Lansing.

Ed Sukla was born on March 3, 1943 in Long Beach, Calif. Sukla was a pitcher with the Los Angeles and California Angels from 1964 to 1966. After his baseball career, he was a long time scout for the Major League Scouting Bureau. Sukla passed away on Sept. 24, 2015 in Irvine, Calif.

John "Bud" Thomas was born March 10, 1929, in Sedalia, Mo. Signed by the St. Louis Browns in 1947, Thomas went on to a seven-year Minor League career, making his big league debut Sept. 2, 1951, for the Browns. Thomas left baseball to pursue his degree in education from Central Missouri State University. He put that degree to use as a teacher, administrator and superintendent of schools. Thomas passed away on Aug. 15, 2015, in Sedalia.

John Tsitouris was born on May 4, 1936 in Monroe, N.C. Right-handed pitcher Tsitouris was signed as an amateur free agent by the Detroit Tigers out of high school in 1954. He played 11 seasons in the Major Leagues for the Reds, Athletics and Tigers. Tsitouris passed away on Oct. 22, 2015 in Monroe, N.C.

Randy Wiles was born on Sept. 10, 1951 in Fort Belvoir, Va. Wiles was drafted by the St. Louis Cardinals in the 1973 amateur draft. Wiles pitched five games for the Chicago White Sox in 1977. He got his first win against the Seattle Mariners on August 8. Wiles passed away on Sept. 15, 2015 in New Orleans.

Charlie Williams was born on Oct. 11, 1947, in Flushing, N.Y. Williams attended Parson College before being drafted by the Mets in the seventh round of the 1968 First-Year Player Draft. He made his debut on April 23, 1971, for the Mets as a right-handed pitcher. In 1972, Williams was traded to the Giants for Willie Mays and spent the rest of his eight-year career with San Francisco. Williams passed away on Jan. 27, 2015, in Port Orange, Fla.

Gary Woods was born on July 20, 1954, in Santa Barbara, Calif. After attending Santa Barbara City College, Woods signed with the Oakland Athletics in 1973 and made his debut with them on Sept. 14, 1976. After finishing the season with the A's, Woods was selected by the Toronto Blue Jays in the expansion draft and became their starting third baseman in the 1977 season. After playing two seasons with the Blue Jays, Woods went on to play with the Astros and Cubs for the rest of his nine-year career. He later spent time scouting for the White Sox. Woods passed away on Feb. 19, 2015, in Solvang, Calif.

Walter Young was born on Feb. 18, 1980 in Hattiesburg, Miss. Young was picked by the Pittsburgh Pirates in the 1999 amateur draft and was in the Pirates farm system for four years. He made his Major League debut with the Baltimore Orioles in 2005 hitting .303 in 14 games. Young passed away on Sept. 19, 2015 in Purvis, Miss.

2014

Larry Arndt was born on Feb. 25, 1963, in Fremont, Ohio. He was drafted by the Oakland Athletics in the 26th round of the 1985 Amateur Draft and made his career debut with the Athletics on June 6, 1989, as a first baseman. Arndt passed away on Jan. 3, 2014, in Toledo Ohio.

Dave Bakenhaster was born on March 5, 1945, in Columbus, Ohio. He made his career debut on June 20, 1964, as a right-handed pitcher with the St. Louis Cardinals. Bakenhaster passed away on July 30, 2014, in Galena, Ohio.

Mark Ballinger  was born on Jan. 31, 1949, in Glendale, Calif. He was drafted by the Cleveland Indians in the second round of the 1967 First-Year Player Draft. Ballinger made his Major League Baseball debut on Aug. 6, 1971, as a relief pitcher. Ballinger passed away on June 13, 2014, in Okeechobee, Fla.

Bruce Barmes was born on Oct. 23, 1919, in Vincennes, Ind. He was signed by the Washington Senators as an amateur free agent in 1950. He made his career debut with the Washington Senators on Sept. 13, 1953, playing for one season as an outfielder. He also spent 11 seasons playing in the Minors from 1950-1960. Barmes passed away on Jan. 25, 2014, in Garner, N.C. 

Vern Benson was born on Sept. 19, 1924, in Granite Quarry, N.C. He was signed in 1943 as an amateur free agent by the Philadelphia Athletics. He made his career debut with the Athletics on July 31, 1943. He spent his playing career with them and the St. Louis Cardinals between 1943-1953. Following his playing career in the Majors, he managed and coached in both the Major and Minor Leagues for 24 years with the Cardinals, Yankees, Reds, Braves and Giants. Benson passed away on Jan. 20, 2014, in Granite Quarry.

Jim Brosnan was born on Oct. 24, 1929, in Cincinnati. Brosnan made his pitching debut with the Chicago Cubs on April 15, 1954. Brosnan pitched nine years in the Majors with the Cubs, Cardinals, Reds and White Sox. Before making it to the big leagues, he served in the military during the Korean War. Brosnan passed away on June 28, 2014, in Morton Grove, Ill.

Jophrey Brown was born on Jan. 22, 1945 in Grambling, La. He was drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the second round of the 1966 Amateur Draft. He made his career debut with the Cubs on Sept. 21, 1968, against the Pittsburgh Pirates as a right-handed pitcher. After his career in baseball, he went on to a long career in Hollywood as a bit-part actor and stuntman. Brown passed away on Jan. 11, 2014 in Newhall, Calif.

Terry "Bud" Bulling was born on Dec. 15, 1952, in Lynwood, Calif. He was drafted by the Minnesota Twins in the 14th round of the 1974 Amateur Draft and made his career debut as a catcher with the Twins on July 3, 1977. During his four-year career, he also played for the Seattle Mariners. On May 6, 1982, he caught Gaylor Perry's 300th win, going 2-for-3 with two runs scored and an RBI in the game. Bulling passed away on March 8, 2014, in Salem, Ore.

Bobby Castillo was born on April 18, 1955, in Los Angeles. He was drafted as a pitcher in the sixth round of the 1974 First-Year Player Draft by the Kansas City Royals. He made his debut on Sept. 10, 1977, with the Dodgers at the age of 22, winning a World Series with them in 1981. Castillo passed away on June 30, 2014, in Los Angeles.

Al Cihocki was born on May 7, 1924, in Naticoke, Pa. He was a utility player for the Cleveland Indians during the 1945 season. Following his season with the Indians, he was the head baseball coach at Luzerne County Community College. Cihocki passed away on March 27, 2014, in Nanticoke.

Mel Clark was born July 1, 1926, in Letart, W. Va. Before playing Major League Baseball, Clark served in the United States Navy during World War II. After his service, he attended Ohio University and was signed by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1947. His Major League debut came on Sept. 11, 1951, as a right fielder. He played with the Phillies until 1955, then with the Detroit Tigers in 1957, his last season. Clark passed away on May 1, 2014, in West Columbia, W. Va.

Jerry Coleman was born on Sept. 14, 1924, in San Jose, Calif. He was signed as an amateur free agent in 1942 by the New York Yankees, with whom he would spend the entirety of his playing career. He made his career debut with the Yankees on April 20, 1949, and continued to play for nine seasons. Colemand appeared in six World Series, winning four, and was also an American League All-Star in 1950. Following his playing career, he began broadcasting for CBS, as well as the Yankees, California Angels and San Diego Padres. Coleman became the lead radio announcer in 1972 for the Padres and continued his career in broadcasting up until the 2014 season. In 2005, he was given the Ford C. Frick Award from the National Baseball Hall of Fame for broadcasting excellence and was inducted to the National Radio Hall of Fame as a sports broadcaster for his years as the play-by-play voice of the Padres. Coleman spent a total of 71 years in baseball overall. He passed away on Jan. 5, 2014, in San Diego.

Jim Command was born on Oct. 15, 1928, in Grand Rapids, Mich. After attending Ferris State University, he signed with the Philadelphia Phillies in 1947 and made his debut on June 20, 1954. Following his retirement, Command was a scout for the Detroit Tigers from 1960 to 1994. Command passed away on Aug. 10, 2014, in Grand Rapids.

Alvin Dark was born on Jan. 7, 1922, in Comanche, Okla. Dark spent time at both Louisiana State University and University of Louisiana Lafayette as a five-sport student athlete before serving in World War II. He was signed by the Boston Braves in 1946 and made his debut on July 14 of that same year. Dark received Rookie of the Year honors in 1948, exceeding rookie limits that year. In his 14-year career, Dark spent time with the New York Giants, Boston and Milwaukee Braves, St. Louis Cardinals, Chicago Cubs and Philadelphia Phillies. A three-time All-Star and two-time National League at-bats leader, Dark won a World Series with the New York Giants in 1954. Following his playing career, he managed the San Francisco Giants, Kansas City Athletics, Cleveland Indians, Oakland Athletics and San Diego Padres, leading Oakland to a World Series Championship in 1974. Dark passed away on Nov. 13, 2014, in Easley, S.C.

Drew Denson was born on Nov. 16, 1965, in Cincinnati. Drafted as a first-round pick by the Atlanta Braves in 1984, Denson made his Major League debut on Sept. 13, 1989, as a first baseman. During his Major League career, he played with both the Braves and Chicago White Sox. Following his playing career, Denson was a Cincinnati police officer. Denson passed away on Feb. 13, 2014, in Cincinnati.

Jack Dittmer was born on Jan. 10, 1928, in Elkader, Iowa. He was signed by the Boston Braves as an amateur free agent in 1950. Dittmer made his career debut on June 17, 1957, as a second baseman, spending one season with the Braves. During his six-year career he also played for the Milwaukee Braves and Detroit Tigers. Dittmer passed away on May 31, 2014, in Strawberry Point, Iowa.

Charles "Whammy" Douglas was born on Feb. 17, 1935, in Carrboro, N.C. Douglas signed with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1953 and made his career debut on July 29, 1957, as a right-handed pitcher. He passed away on Nov. 16, 2014, in Richlands, N.C.

Jim Dunegan was born on Aug. 6, 1947, in Burlington, Iowa. After attending Bacone College and Iowa State University, Dunegan was drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the second round of the 1967 First-Year Player Draft. Drafted as an outfielder, Dunegan transitioned to a pitching role and made his debut on May 28, 1970, as a right-handed pitcher. Dunegan passed away on Oct. 20, 2014, in Iowa City, Iowa.

Grant Dunlap was born on Dec. 20, 1923, in Stockton, Calif. Dunlap was signed by the Cincinnati Reds in 1941 and played two seasons in the Minors before joining the United States Marine Corps to serve in World War II. Upon returning from service, Dunlap made his Major League debut on April 21, 1953, for the St. Louis Cardinals. After his playing career, Dunlap went on to graduate from the University of the Pacific and became a professor of physical education, as well as head baseball coach and athletic director at Occidental College. Dunlap passed away on Sept. 10, 2014, in Vista, Calif.

George Freese was born on Sept. 12, 1926, in Wheeling, W. Va. Freese attended both the University of Pittsburgh and West Virginia University, then was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1948. He made his Major League debut on April 29, 1953, as a third baseman with the Detroit Tigers. Freese spent the 1955 season with the Pittsburgh Pirates, splitting the starting third base position with his brother, Gene Freese. Following his retirement from the big leagues in 1961, Freese became a Minor League manager and scout within the Cubs organization. He passed away on July 27, 2014, in Portland, Ore.

Jim Fregosi was born on April 4, 1942, in San Francisco. He was signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent in 1960. Fregosi made his career debut on Sept. 14, 1961, with the Los Angeles Angles at shortstop. Throughout his 18 seasons in the Majors, he played with the Angels, Texas Rangers, New York Mets and Pittsburgh Pirates. He finished his career having made six All-Star appearances and winning the Gold Glove in 1967. Following his playing career, Fregosi spent 18 years managing in both the Major and Minor Leagues for the Angels, Chicago White Sox, Philadelphia Phillies and Toronto Blue Jays. Fregosi passed away on Feb. 14, 2014, in Miami.

William "Gabe" Gabler was born on Aug. 4, 1930, in St. Louis. He was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1950. He made his career debut with the Chicago Cubs on Sept. 16, 1958, as a pinch hitter and continued playing with them for one season. After his career in the Majors, he spent three more years in the Minors, totaling 11 seasons in professional baseball. Gabler passed away on Jan. 4, 2014, in St. Louis.

Michael Gordon was born Sept. 11, 1953, in Leominster, Mass. He was drafted by the Chicago Cubs in the third round of the 1972 First-Year Player Draft and made his career debut as a catcher on April 7, 1977. Gordon passed away on May 26, 2014, in Boston.

Don Grate was born Aug. 27, 1923, in Greenfield, Ohio. He made his Major League debut on July 6, 1945, after attending Ohio State University. Grate spent two years in the Majors with the Philadelphia Phillies, before moving on to play in the NBA with the Sheboygan Red Skins. He passed away on Nov. 22, 2014, in Miami Gardens, Fla.

John Gray was born Dec. 11, 1926, in West Palm Beach, Fla. He attended Rollins College in Winter Park, Fla., and was signed by the New York Yankees in 1950. He made his Major League debut on July 18, 1954, for the Philadelphia Athletics as a pitcher. During his time in the Majors from 1954-1958, Gray also played with the Kansas City Athletics, Cleveland Indians and Philadelphia Phillies. Gray passed away on May 21, 2014, in Boca Raton, Fla.

Al Greene was born on Nov. 9, 1954, in Detroit. He was signed by the Detroit Tigers as an amateur free agent in 1976 and made his Major League debut with them on July 23, 1979, playing one season. Greene passed away on Feb. 18, 2014, in Detroit.

Anthony "Tony" Gwynn was born on May 9, 1960, in Los Angeles. He was drafted in the third round in 1981 and made his pro debut that same summer as a right fielder. A lifetime .338 hitter, Gwynn once hit .394 in a season. He was a 15-time All-Star, five-time Gold Glove winner, seven-time Silver Slugger, eight-time batting champion and a seven-time National League hits leader. Gwynn was inducted into the Baseball Hall of Fame in 2007. After his playing years, Gwynn was a broadcaster for ESPN as well as the head coach for the San Diego State baseball team. Gwynn passed away on June 16, 2014, in Poway, Calif.

Brad Halsey was born on Feb. 14, 1981, in Houston. Halsey spent time at both Hill College and the University of Texas at Austin before being drafted in the eighth round of the 2002 First-Year Player Draft. He made his debut on June 19, 2004, as a left-handed pitcher with the Yankees. Halsey spent three years in the Majors, with the Yankees, Diamondbacks and Athletics. He passed away on Oct. 31, 2014, in New Braunfels, Texas.

William "Billy" Harrell was born July 18, 1928, in Norristown, Pa. He was signed in 1955 by the Cleveland Indians out of Sienna College. His Major League debut came on Sept. 2, 1955, as an infielder. After playing with the Indians until 1958, Harrell played for the Boston Red Sox. He continued playing in the Minors until 1966. Harrell passed away on May 6, 2014, in Albany, N.Y.

Bill Henry was born on Oct. 15, 1927, in Alice, Texas. He made his Major League debut with the Boston Red Sox on April 17, 1952. Over his 16-year MLB career, he pitched for the Red Sox, Chicago Cubs, San Francisco Giants, Pittsburgh Pirates and Houston Astros. Henry was named to the 1960 All-Star team and also appeared in the 1961 World Series. Henry passed away on April 11, 2014, in Round Rock, Texas.

John Hoover was born on Dec. 22, 1962, in Fresno, Calif. He was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles as the 25th overall pick of the 1984 First-Year Player Draft. He made his Major League debut on May 23, 1990, as a pitcher for the Texas Rangers. In 1984, Hoover was the starting pitcher for the United States Olympic Baseball team and helped lead the U.S. to a silver medal in the Olympic Games. Hoover passed away on July 8, 2014, in Fresno, Calif.

Tim Hosley was born on May 10, 1947, in Spartanburg, S.C. He was signed by the Detroit Tigers in 1966 as an amateur free agent and made his career debut on Sept. 8 1970. Throughout his 10-year career he also played for the Oakland Athletics and Chicago Cubs as a catcher and pinch hitter. Hosley passed away on Jan. 21, 2014, in Moore, S.C. 

Ed Keegan was born on July 8, 1939, in Camden, N.J. Keegan was signed by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1957 and made his debut on Aug. 24, 1959. He spent three years in the Majors, with the Phillies and Kansas City Athletics. Keegan passed away on Oct. 19, 2014, in Franklinville, N.J.

Russ Kemmerer was born on Nov. 1, 1930, in Pittsburgh. Kemmerer was signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent in 1951 after attending both Glenville State College and the University of Pittsburgh. He made his debut on June 27, 1954, with the Red Sox, and also went on to play with the Washington Senators, Chicago White Sox and Houston Colt .45s. Kemmerer passed away on Dec. 8, 2014, in Indianapolis.

Art Kenney was born on April 29, 1916, in Milford, Mass. In 1938 he was signed by the Boston Bees as an amateur free agent. He made his Major League debut as a left-handed pitcher with the Bees against the Philadelphia Phillies on July 1, 1938. After his season with the Bees, he spent time serving in the Army Air Force and as a teacher and principal. Kenney passed away on March 12, 2014, in Littleton, N.H.

Ralph Kiner was born on Oct. 27, 1922, in Santa Rita, N.M. He was signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates as an amateur free agent in 1941, making his career debut on April 16, 1946, with the Pirates. During his 10-year career, he played for the Pirates, Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians, totaling 369 runs, hitting more than 50 runs in a season twice and driving in 1,015 runs. During his first seven seasons with the Pirates from 1946 to 1953, Kiner led the National League in home runs every year, still a record streak for either league. He finished his playing career having made six National League All-Star appearances from 1948 to 1953, as well as holding multiple home run records including being the quickest player in MLB history to hit 300 home runs. Following his playing career, Kiner made his way into the broadcasting world with the Chicago White Sox and the New York Mets. He spent more than 50 years broadcasting and is well-known for his post-game show "Kiner's Korner". He was inducted into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in 1975 and the Mets Hall of Fame in 1984. The Pirates retired his uniform number, 4, in 1987. Kiner passed away on Feb. 6, 2014, in Rancho Mirage, Calif.

Bill Koski was born on Feb. 6, 1932, in Madera, Calif. Koski was signed as an amateur free agent in 1950 and made his debut the following year, on April 28, 1951, for the Pirates. After his 1951 season as a relief pitcher, Koski served in the Korean War as a member of the United States Armed Services. Following his professional baseball career, Koski was the pitching coach at California State University, Stanislaus. Koski passed away on July 9, 2014, in Modesto, Calif.

Chuck Kress was born on Dec. 9, 1921, in Philadelphia. In 1940 he was signed by the Cincinnati Reds as an amateur free agent. He made his career debut with the Reds on April 16, 1947, at first base. During his four seasons in the Majors he played with the Chicago White Sox, Reds, Detroit Tigers and Brooklyn Dodgers. Kress passed away on March 4, 2014, in Colville, Wash.

Les Layton was born on Nov. 18, 1921, in Nardin, Okla. He made his career debut with the New York Giants on April 24, 1948, as a pinch runner against the Boston Braves. The next season, he was sent back down to the Minors where he finished his professional playing career in 1953. Layton passed away on March 1, 2014, in Scottsdale, Ariz.

Don Lenhardt was born on Oct. 4, 1922, in Alton, Ill. He was signed by the St. Louis Browns in 1946. Lenhardt made his big league debut on April 18, 1950, as a left fielder. He played professionally for five years with the Baltimore Orioles, Chicago White Sox, Boston Red Sox and Detroit Tigers. Lenhardt passed away on July 9, 2014, in Chesterfield, Mo.

George Lerchen was born on Dec. 1, 1922, in Detroit. He was signed by the Detroit Tigers as an amateur free agent in 1942 and made his Major League Baseball debut with them on April 15, 1952. He also played for the Cincinnati Reds in 1953. Lerchen served in the United States Navy during World War II, from 1943 to 1945, in the middle of his time spent playing professional baseball. Lerchen passed away on March 26, 2014, in Garden City, Mich.

Lou Lucier was born on March 23, 1918, in Northbridge, Mass. Lucier spent three years in the Majors with the Phillies and Red Sox after making his debut as a right-handed pitcher on April 23, 1943, with Boston. Lucier passed away on Oct. 18, 2014, in Millbury, Mass.

Jerry Lumpe was born June 2, 1933, in Lincoln, Mo. After attending Missouri State University, Lumpe was signed by the New York Yankees as a free agent in 1951. He made his debut as an infielder on April 17, 1956, with the Yankees before moving on to play with the Kansas City Athletics and Detroit Tigers during his 12-year career. Highlights of Lumpe's career include a World Series win in 1958 with the Yankees and an All-Star honor in 1964. Following the end of his playing career, Lumpe coached with the Oakland Athletics. Lumpe passed away on Aug. 15, 2014, in Springfield, Mo.

Gordon MacKenzie was born July 9, 1937, in St. Petersburg, Fla. He signed as a free agent with the Kansas City Athletics in 1956 and made his debut as a catcher six years later, on Aug. 13, 1961. MacKenzie only spent one year as a player in the Majors, but he went on to have a lengthy career as a Minor League manager and Major League coach with the Kansas City Royals, Chicago Cubs, San Francisco Giants and Cleveland Indians. MacKenzie passed away on Aug. 12, 2014, in St. Petersburg.

Hector Maestri was born on April 19, 1935, in La Habana, Cuba. He was signed by the Washington Senators as an amateur free agent in 1956 and made his career debut on Sept. 24, 1960, as a pitcher. He finished his career in the Majors in 1961 with a 1.12 ERA. Maestri passed away on Feb. 21, 2014, in Miami.

Leo Marentette was born on Feb. 18, 1941, in Detroit. Marentette was signed by the Detroit Tigers in 1960 and made his Major League debut with the Tigers on Sept. 26, 1965, as a pitcher. Marentette went on to play on Canada's first Major League team, the Montreal Expos, in 1969. Marentette passed away on May 8, 2014, in Lambertville, Mich.

Conrado Marrero was born on April 25, 1911, in Sagua La Grande, Villa Clara, Cuba. He was signed by the Washington Senators as an amateur free agent in 1947 and made his career debut on April 21, 1950. Marrero spent the entirety of his five-year career with the Senators and was named to the 1951 All-Star team. After celebrating his 102nd birthday on April 25, 2013, he became only the second former big leaguer to reach that age. Marrero passed away two days shy of his 103rd birthday on April 23, 2014, in Havana.

Jose Martinez was born July 26, 1942, in Cardenas, Cuba. A utility infielder, Martinez was signed by the Pirates in 1960 and made his debut as a pinch hitter on April 12, 1969. He spent two years with the Pirates before ending his Major League career. Following his playing days, Martinez was a coach with the Royals, Cubs and Braves, winning a World Series with Kansas City in 1985. Martinez passed away on Oct. 1, 2014, in Orlando, Fla.

Jackie Mayo was born July 26, 1925, in Litchfield, Ill. He attended the University of Notre Dame before signing with the Phillies in 1947. Mayo made his debut Sept. 19, 1948, as a left fielder and spent the entirety of his six-year career with Philadelphia. Mayo passed away on Aug. 19, 2014, in North Lima, Ohio.

Billy McCool was born on July 14, 1944, in Batesville, Ind. He was signed by the Cincinnati Reds as an amateur free agent in 1963. McCool made his career debut on April 24, 1964, with the Reds and went on to play with the Padres and Cardinals during his seven-year career. McCool passed away on June 8, 2014, in Summerfield, Fla.

Ezra "Pat" McGlothin was born on Oct. 20, 1920, in Coalfield, Tenn. Prior to making it to the big leagues, McGlothin attended the University of Tennessee and served his country in the Navy in World War II. McGlothin made his debut on April 25, 1949, as a relief pitcher on Opening Day for the Brooklyn Dodgers. He spent two years in the Majors with the Dodgers before finishing his career. McGlothin passed away on Oct. 24, 2014, in Knoxville, Tenn.

Rogers McKee was born Sept. 16, 1926, in Shelby, N.C. McKee made his debut with the Philadelphia Phillies on Aug. 18, 1943, at just 16 years old. A left-handed pitcher, McKee spent two seasons with the Phillies before enlisting in the Navy to serve in World War II. After returning from war, McKee spent 11 seasons in the Minors but never made it back up to the big leagues. McKee passed away on Sept. 1, 2014, in Shelby.

Charlie Mead was born on April 9, 1921, in Vermilion, Canada. Mead made his debut at right field with the New York Giants on Aug. 28, 1943, spending three years with the Giants before ending his Major League career. Mead passed away on May 8, 2014, in Victorville, Calif.

Kelvin Moore was born Sept. 26, 1957, in Leroy, Ala. After attending Jackson State University, Moore was selected in the sixth round of the 1978 First-Year Player Draft by the Athletics. Moore made his debut on Aug. 28, 1981, and by 1983 had earned the Athletics' starting first baseman slot. He also spent time in the Mets, Brewers and White Sox organizations at the Minor League level. Moore passed away on Nov. 9, 2014, in Covington, Ga.

Guy "Moose" Morton was born on Nov. 4, 1930, in Tuscaloosa, Ala. He attended the University of Alabama and was signed by the Boston Red Sox in 1949. His Major League debut came on Sept. 17, 1954, as a pitcher for the Red Sox. His father was Guy Morton Sr., who pitched for the Cleveland Indians. Morton passed away on May 11, 2014, in Lorain, Ohio.

Edward O'Brien was born on Dec. 11, 1930, in South Amboy, N.J. In 1953 he signed as an amateur free agent with the Pittsburgh Pirates. He made his career debut with the Pirates as an infielder on April 25, 1953. At the end of O'Brien's five years in the Majors, he became the athletic director at Seattle University and also coached the Seattle Pilots. O'Brien passed away on Feb. 21, 2014, in Seattle.

Charlie Osgood was born on Nov. 23, 1926, in Somerville, Mass. He was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers and made his Major League debut on June 18, 1944. He also spent two seasons playing in the Minor Leagues. Osgood passed away on Jan. 23, 2014, in Tweksbury, Mass.

Joe Pittman was born on Jan. 1, 1953, in Houston. He was drafted by the Houston Astros in the fifth round of the 1975 First-Year Player Draft. He also played for the San Diego Padres and San Francisco Giants. He later served as a scout for the Houston Astros from 1988-2003 and as a Minor League instructor in 1996. Pittman passed away on June 12, 2014, in Lake Jackson, Texas.

Herb Plews was born June 14, 1928, in Helena, Mont. He was signed in 1950 by the New York Yankees out of the University of Illinois, but he put his baseball career on hold to serve in the military. Plews returned to baseball and made his Major League debut on April 18, 1956, as a pinch hitter with the Washington Senators. During his four-year career, he spent time with both the Senators and the Boston Red Sox. Plews passed away on Dec. 12, 2014, in Boulder, Colo.

Bob Powell was born on Oct. 17, 1933, in Flint, Mich. He was drafted by the Chicago White Sox in 1955 and made his debut as a pinch runner on Sept. 16, 1955. He played for the White Sox until 1957. After playing in the Majors, Powell spent his days as a civil engineer and worked on the construction of the United States Air Force Academy. Powell passed away on April 26, 2014, in Muscle Shoals, Ala.

Art Quirk was born April 11, 1938, in Providence, R.I. Before signing with the Baltimore Orioles in 1959, Quirk led his South Kingstown High School team to two Rhode Island state baseball championships and attended Dartmouth College on an academic scholarship. He made his debut as a left-handed pitcher on April 17, 1962, with the Orioles and spent 1962 with them before playing the 1963 season with the Washington Senators. Quirk passed away on Nov. 22, 2014, in Stonington, Conn.

Bill Renna was born on Oct. 14, 1924, in Hanford, Calif. He was signed by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1949 and made his Major League debut on April 14, 1953, as an outfielder. He continued his career with the Philadelphia Athletics, Kansas City Athletics, Boston Red Sox and San Francisco Seals. Before joining the Major Leagues, Renna attended the University of San Francisco and joined the Marine Corps, serving in the South Pacific. At the height of his baseball career in 1954 with the Philadelphia Athletics, he hit a career-high 13 home runs and scored 52 runs. Renna passed away on June 19, 2014, in San Jose, Calif.

Allen Ripley was born Oct. 18, 1952, in Northwood, Mass. The son of former Red Sox pitcher Walt Ripley, Allen was signed by the Red Sox in 1972 and made his debut on April 10, 1978. After two years with the Red Sox, Ripley went on to play with the Giants and Cubs for the rest of his five-year career. Ripley passed away on Nov. 7, 2014, in North Attleboro, Mass.

Earl Robinson was born on Nov. 3, 1936, in New Orleans. Robinson was a College World Series champion with the California Golden Bears in 1957. He signed with the Los Angeles Dodgers in 1958 and made his debut on Sept. 10, 1958, at third base. Robinson played four seasons in the Majors with the Dodgers and Baltimore Orioles. Robinson passed away on July 4, 2014, in Fountain Valley, Calif.

Jeff Robinson was born on Dec. 14, 1961, in Ventura, Calif. Drafted in the third round of the 1983 First-Year Player Draft by the Detroit Tigers out of Azusa Pacific University, Robinson was a right-handed pitcher that led his college team to two NAIA College World Series appearances. He made his Major League debut on April 12, 1987, for the Tigers and went on to a 9-6 record in his rookie year. Robinson spent four seasons with Detroit before moving on to short stints with the Baltimore Orioles, Texas Rangers and Pittsburgh Pirates. Robinson passed away Oct. 26, 2014, in Overland Park, Mo.

Jean-Pierre Roy was born on June 26, 2014, in Montreal. Roy made his debut on May 5, 1946, with the Brooklyn Dodgers as a relief pitcher. Following his long career in the Minors, Roy became a broadcaster for the Montreal Expos. Roy passed away on Oct. 31, 2014, in Pompano Beach, Fla.

John "Sonny" Ruberto was born on Jan. 2, 1946, in Staten Island, N.Y. In 1964 he was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals as an amateur free agent and made his career debut with the San Diego Padres on May 25, 1969, as a catcher. Throught his career, from 1969 to 1972, he also played with the Cincinnati Reds. After two seasons in the Majors, he went on to become a big league coach for St. Louis Cardinals and a Minor League manager. Ruberto passed away on March 24, 2014, in Ave Maria, Fla.

Ray Sadecki was born on Dec. 26, 1940, in Kansas City, Kan. He signed as a left-handed pitcher with the St. Louis Cardinals in 1958 and made his debut on May 19, 1960. Sadecki spent 18 years in the Majors, compiling a record of 135-131 with a career ERA of 3.78. His best year came in 1964 when he pitched his only 20-win season and helped the Cardinals to a World Series championship. Following his eight years with St. Louis, Sadecki also played for the Mets, Giants, Royals, Braves and Brewers. Sadecki passed away Nov. 17, 2014, in Mesa, Ariz.

Art Schult was born June 20, 1928, in Brooklyn, N.Y. After attending Georgetown University, Schult was signed by the New York Yankees in 1948. He made his Major League debut on May 17, 1953, as an outfielder. Throughout his five-year career, Schult spent equal time as an outfielder and first baseman with the Yankees, Chicago Cubs, Cincinnati Redlegs and Washington Senators. Schult passed away on July 25, 2014, in Ocala, Fla.

George Shuba was born Dec. 13, 1924, in Youngstown, Ohio. Shuba signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1944 and spent the entirety of his seven-year career with the team as an outfielder. He made his debut on July 2, 1948, and ended his career with the Dodgers' World Series win in 1955. Shuba passed away on Sept. 29, 2014, in Youngstown.

Earl Smith was born March 14, 1928, in Sunnyside, Wash. Smith attended California State University, Fresno, before signing with the Pittsburgh Pirates in 1949. Smith made his Major League debut on April 14, 1955, as an outfielder with the Pirates. He returned to California following his career and owned a grocery store until his retirement. Smith passed away Sept. 27, 2014, in Fresno, Calif.

Hal Smith was born on June 1, 1931, in Barling, Ark. He was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals as an amateur free agent in 1949. On May 2, 1956, he made his career debut as a catcher with the Cardinals, with whom he continued playing for six seasons. Smith also played for the Pittsburgh Pirates and made two All-Star appearances during his career. Following his playing days, he spent 10 years coaching the Majors with the Pirates, Cincinnati Reds and Milwaukee Brewers. Smith passed away on April 12, 2014, in Fort Smith, Ark.

George Spencer was born July 7, 1926, in Columbus, Ohio. Both a member of the baseball team and the starting quarterback while at Ohio State University, Spencer went on to sign with the New York Giants in 1948. Spencer made his Major League debut on Aug. 17, 1950, for the Giants and spent six years with New York before playing his last two seasons with the Detroit Tigers. After finishing his playing career, Spencer was a pitching instructor with the Tigers and Reds organizations. Spencer passed away on Sept. 10, 2014, in Galena, Ohio.

Oscar Taveras was born June 19, 1992, in Puerto Plata, Dominican Republic. Signed at 16 by the St. Louis Cardinals in 2008, Taveras spent time in the Cardinals' Minor League system as one of the top prospects of Major League Baseball. Taveras made his debut on May 31, 2014, in right field, hitting a home run in his second Major League at-bat. Taveras passed away Oct. 26, 2014, in Puerto Plata.

Dick Teed was born March 8, 1926, in Springfield, Mass. Teed signed with the Brooklyn Dodgers in 1947 and spent 17 years in the Minors, making his only Major League appearance on July 24, 1953, as a pinch hitter. He transitioned to the role of player/coach in 1960 and continued his involvement in baseball as a manager and scout with the Phillies and Dodgers. Teed passed away on Aug. 17, 2014, in Newport, R.I.

Frank Torre was born on Dec. 30, 2014, in Brooklyn, N.Y. After signing with the Boston Braves in 1950, Torre spent two years in the Minors before leaving baseball to serve his country for two years in the military. Upon his return, Torre made his debut on April 20, 1956, as a first baseman for the Milwaukee Braves. A highlight of Torre's career came in 1957, when the Braves defeated the New York Yankees to win the World Series. In his seven-year career, Torre spent time with both the Braves and the Phillies. Upon his retirement from baseball, he became an executive at Rawlings Sporting Goods and was also the vice president of Baseball Assistance Team. Torre passed away on Sept. 13, 2014, in Palm Beach Gardens, Fla.

Bob Usher was born on March 1, 1925, in San Diego. Usher signed with the Cincinnati Reds in 1943 and played only one game in the Minors before leaving to serve his country in the United States Navy during World War II. He returned to baseball and made his debut on April 16, 1946, as an outfielder for the Reds. Usher spent four years with the Reds, then finished his career with the Cubs, Indians and Senators. Following his retirement from baseball, Usher went into government work with the Department of the Interior in Washington, D.C. Usher passed away on Dec. 29, 2014, in San Jose, Calif.

Roberto Vargas was born on May 29, 1929, in Santurce, Puerto Rico. He made his Major League debut on April 17, 1955, with the Braves as a pitcher. Vargas passed away on May 27, 2014, in Caguas, Puerto Rico.

Tom Veryzer was born on Feb. 11, 1953, in Port Jefferson, N.Y. He was drafted 11th overall by the Detroit Tigers in the 1971 First-Year Player Draft. Veryzer made his debut on Aug. 14, 1973, at shortstop and was on the 1975 Topps All-Star Rookie Team. He was also on the 1984 National League East-champion Chicago Cubs. Veryzer passed away on July 8, 2014, in Islip, N.Y.

Bob Welch was born on Nov. 3, 1956, in Detroit. He was drafted by the Los Angeles Dodgers with the 20th overall pick in the first round of the 1977 First-Year Player Draft and made his career debut on June 20, 1978, as a pitcher. During his 17-year career, Welch played for the Los Angeles Dodgers and Oakland Athletics. At the height of his career in 1990, he won the American League Cy Young Award and was also a two-time All-Star. After his retirement, Welch served as the pitching coach for the Arizona Diamondbacks in 2001, the same year they defeated the Yankees in the World Series. Welch passed away on June 9, 2014, in Seal Beach, Calif.

Dick Welteroth was born on Aug. 3, 1927, in Williamsport, Pa. He was drafted by the Washington Senators in 1945 and made his Major League debut for the Senators on May 16, 1948, as a relief pitcher. Welteroth retired in 1950 with the Senators. He passed away on May 7, 2014, in Williamsport.

Bob Wiesler was born on Aug. 13, 1930, in St. Louis. After signing with the Yankees in 1949, Wiesler made his debut on Aug. 3, 1951, as the starting pitcher. Wiesler spent the rest of the 1951 season with the Yankees, then left baseball to serve the Army in the Korean War. Returning to baseball in 1954, Wiesler spent two more seasons with the Yankees before being traded to the Senators, closing out his career in Washington D.C. for three final years. Wiesler passed away on Aug. 10, 2014, in Florissant, Mo.

Robert "Red" Wilson was born March 7, 1929, in Milwaukee. A graduate of the University of Wisconsin, Wilson was named an All-American in football and led his team to the 1950 College World Series before passing on a chance to play in the NFL with the Philadelphia Eagles and signing with the Chicago White Sox in 1950. Wilson made his debut on Sept. 22, 1951, catching four games that season. He spent three years with the White Sox before being traded to the Detroit Tigers. During his tenure with the Tigers, Wilson was behind the plate for Jim Bunning's 1958 no-hitter. In his 10-year career, Wilson also spent time with the Indians. Wilson passed away on Aug. 8, 2014, in Fitchburg, Wis.

Donald "Zim" Zimmer was born on Jan. 17, 1931, in Cincinnati. He was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1949. He played with the Dodgers, Cubs, Mets, Reds and Senators during his 12-year career. Zimmer was the 1955 Caribbean Series MVP, a two-time World Series champion, a National League All-Star in 1961 and Manager of the Year in 1989. He also played in Japan in 1966. Following his retirement, Zimmer worked in Minor League Baseball before managing or coaching for the Montreal Expos, San Diego Padres, Boston Red Sox, New York Yankees, Chicago Cubs, San Francisco Giants, Colorado Rockies and Tampa Bay Rays. He also published two books about his life. Zimmer passed away on June 4, 2014, in Dunedin, Fla.

George Zuverink was born on Aug. 20, 1924, in Holland, Mich. Zuverink attended Hope College before serving in the United States Air Force for three years during World War II. After his service, Zuverink was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals in 1946 and made his Major League debut on April 21, 1951, as a relief pitcher with the Cleveland Indians. Spending eight years in the big leagues, Zuverink played for the Indians, Reds, Tigers and Orioles before his retirement in 1959. Zuverink passed away on Sept. 8, 2014, in Tempe, Ariz.

2013

Joseph Astroth was born on Sept. 1, 1922, in East Alton, Ill. He was signed by the Philadelphia Athletics as an amateur free agent in 1945. He made his debut on Aug. 13, 1945, as a center fielder, and remained with the Athletics for the span of his career. Over his 10-year career, he had 15 RBIs as well as .254 batting average. Astroth passed away on May 3, 2013, in Boca Raton, Fla.

Matthew Batts was born on Oct. 16, 1921, in San Antonio. He was signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent in 1942. He made his debut on Sept. 10, 1947, with the Red Sox. Throughout his career Batts played with Red Sox, St. Louis Browns, Detroit Tigers, Chicago White Sox and Cincinnati Redlegs. He ended his 10-year career having hit 26 home runs with a .269 batting average. Batts passed away on July 14, 2013, in Baton Rouge, La. 

John "Zeke" Bella was born on Aug. 23, 1930, in Greenwich, Conn. He was signed by the New York Yankees in 1951 as an amateur free agent. He made his debut with the Yankees on Sept. 11, 1957, as a pinch hitter. During his career he played for both the Yankees and Kansas City Athletics. Bella passed away on Nov. 17, 2013, in Greenwich.

Charles Bicknell  was born on July 27, 1928, in Plainfield, NJ. He was signed as an amateur free agent by the Philadelphia Phillies in 1947. He made his career debut on April 22, 1948, as a pitcher with the Phillies. Bicknell passed away on Nov. 23, 2013, in Livingston, Mont.

Werner "Babe" Birrer  was born on July 4, 1929, in Buffalo, N.Y. He was signed by the Detroit Tigers as an amateur free agent in 1947. He made his career debut with the Tigers on June 5, 1955, as a pitcher. He also played for the Baltimore Orioles and the Los Angeles Dodgers. Birrer passed away on Nov. 19, 2013, in Clarence, N.Y.

Paul Blair was born on Feb. 1, 1944, in Cushing, Okla. He was signed by the New York Mets as an amateur free agent in 1961. He made his career debut on Sept. 9, 1964, with the Baltimore Orioles as a center fielder. Throughout his career he played for the Orioles, New York Yankees and Cincinnati Reds. Blair was the starting center fielder for the Orioles when they won two World Series championships, then won two more titles while playing for the Yankees. During his 17-year career he made two All-Star Game appearances and was also an eight-time AL Gold Glove winner. Blair passed away on Dec. 26, 2013, in Baltimore, Md.

Milton Bolling  was born on Aug. 9, 1930, in Mississippi City, Miss. He signed with the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent in 1948. He made his debut on Sept. 10, 1952, as a shortstop but played a variety of infield positions over his career. He played for the Red Sox, Senators and Tigers throughout his career. He ended his career having hit 49 home runs with a .238 batting average. Bolling passed away on Jan. 19, 2013, in Mobile, Ala.

Thomas Borland was born on Feb. 14,1933, in El Dorado, Kan. He signed as a free agent with the Boston Red Sox in 1958. He made his debut on May 15, 1960, with the Red Sox as a pitcher. Borland was well-known for leading his team at Oklahoma A&M to the College World Series in 1955. He went 11-0 with a 2.13 ERA and 143 strikeouts. He was named All-American that year and MVP of the CWS. Borland passed away on March 2, 2013, in Stillwater, Okla.

Edward Bouchee was born on March 7, 1933, in Livingston, Mont. He made his debut on Sept. 19, 1956, with the Philadelphia Phillies as a pinch hitter. In the 1957 season, Bouchee was the Phillies' Opening Day first baseman and went on to hit .293 with 17 home runs and 76 RBIs and appeared in all 154 games. He also earned the top National League rookie honor from The Sporting News that season. During his career Bouchee also played with the Chicago Cubs and New York Mets. Bouchee passed away on Jan. 23, 2013, in Phoenix.

Leland "Lou" Brissie was born on June 5, 1924, in Anderson, S.C. He was signed by the Philadelphia Athletics as an amateur free agent in 1946. He made his career debut on Sept. 28, 1947, as a pitcher with the Athletics. During his career he played for the Athletics and Cleveland Indians. In 1949 he made an appearance in the All-Star Game and finished his career with a 4.07 ERA and .227 batting average. Brissie passed away on Nov. 25, 2013, in Augusta, Ga. 

William "Gates" Brown was born on May 2, 1939, in Crestline, Ohio. He was signed by the Detroit Tigers as an amateur free agent in 1960. He made his career debut on June 19, 1963, for the Tigers as a pinch hitter. In 1968 he won a World Series with the Detroit Tigers. He finished his career with 84 home runs, 322 RBIs and a .257 batting average. Brown passed away on Sept. 27, 2013, in Detroit.

Ellis Burton was born on Aug. 12, 1936, in Los Angeles. He was signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates as an amateur free agent in 1955. He made his career debut on Sept. 18, 1958, with the St. Louis Cardinals as an outfielder. During his career Burton also played for the Chicago Cubs and Cleveland Indians. He finished his career with 17 home runs and a .216 batting average. Burton passed away on Oct. 1, 2013, in Fontana, Calif. 

Rick Camp was born on June 10, 1953, in Trion, Ga. He was drafted by the Atlanta Braves in the seventh round of the 1974 amateur draft. He made his debut on Sept. 15, 1976, as a pitcher for the Braves. He had a career ERA of 3.37 and hit 72 home runs. Camp passed away on April 25, 2013, in Rydal, Ga.

Frank Castillo was born on April 1, 1969, in El Paso, Texas. He was drafted in the sixth round of the 1987 amateur draft by the Chicago Cubs. He made his career debut on June 27, 1991, with the Cubs as a pitcher. He played with the Cubs, Colorado Rockies, Detroit Tigers, Toronto Blue Jays, Boston Red Sox and Florida Marlins during his career. Castillo passed away on July 28, 2013, in Bartlett Lake, Ariz.

Robert Chance was born on Sept. 10, 1940, in Statesboro, Ga. He was signed by the San Francisco Giants as an amateur free agent in 1961. He made his career debut on Sept. 4, 1963, with the Cleveland Indians as a pinch hitter, but he was also a right fielder and first baseman. During his career he played for the Indians, Washington Senators and California Angels. He finished his career with 24 home runs, 112 RBIs and a .261 batting average. Chance passed away on Oct. 3, 2013, in Charleston, W. Va. 

Barbra "Neil" Chrisley was born on Dec. 16, 1931, in Calhoun Falls, S.C. He was signed by the Boston Red Sox in 1950 as an amateur free agent. He had his career debut with the Washington Senators on April 15, 1957, as a pinch hitter. He played for the Washington Senators, Detroit Tigers and Milwaukee Braves. He passed away on May 18, 2013, in Conway, S.C.

James Cosman was born on Feb. 19, 1943, in Brockport, N.Y. He was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals as an amateur free agent in 1962. He made his debut on Oct. 2, 1966, as a pitcher for the Cardinals. During his career he also played for the New York Mets, Chicago Cubs and spent his final season with the Indianapolis Indians. He had a career ERA of 3.05. Cosman passed away on Jan. 7, 2013, in Roswell, Ga.

Rodney Craig was born on Jan. 12, 1958, in Los Angeles. He was signed by the Seattle Mariners as an amateur free agent in 1977. He made his career debut on Sept. 11, 1979, with the Seattle Mariners as the starting right fielder. For the rest of his first season with the Mariners he remained as their starter in right field and posted a batting average of .385 and eight doubles in 16 games. He played for the Mariners, Cleveland Indians and Chicago White Sox. Craig passed away on Aug. 17, 2013, in Los Angeles. 

William "Bill" Currie was born on Nov. 29, 1926, in Leary, Ga. He made his career debut on April 13, 1955, with the Washington Senators as a pitcher. Before and after Currie's Major League career he also spent 10 years in the Minor Leagues and finished with a winning record of 92-72 and a 4.04 ERA. Currie passed away on Oct. 30, 2013, in Arlington, Ga.

Harold "Jack" Daniels was born on Dec. 21, 1927, in Chester, Pa. He made his debut on April 18, 1952, with the Boston Braves as a pinch hitter. He appeared in 106 games with the Braves and had 219 at-bats and a .187 batting average. Daniels passed away on April 16, 2013, in Shreveport, La.

Pompeyo "Yo-Yo" Davalillo was born on June 30,1928, in Cabimas, Zuila, Venezuela. He was signed by the Washington Senators as an amateur free agent in 1953. He made his debut on Aug. 1, 1953, as pinch runner for the Senators. He spent one month with the Senators and had a .293 batting average that season, then voulntarily retired in 1954 due to broken bones in his leg suffered during a Venezuelan Winter League game. Davalillo passed away on Feb. 28, 2013, in Ocumare del Tuy, Miranda, Venezuela.

Michael Davison was born on Aug. 4, 1945, in Galesburg, Ill. He was signed by the Baltimore Orioles as an amateur free agent in 1964. He made his debut on Oct. 1, 1969, as pitcher for the San Fransisco Giants. He went 3-5 with the Giants that year and pitched in 31 relief outings. He continued to pitch in the Minor Leagues the year following his career. He once struck out 18 consecutive batters while pitching in an amateur game. Daviso passed away on May 11, 2013, in Glencoe, Minn.

Ellis "Cot" Deal was born on Jan. 23, 1923, in Arapaho, Okla. He was signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates as an amateur free agent in 1940. He made his debut as a pitcher for the Boston Red Sox on Sept. 11, 1947. Deal played four seasons in the Majors with the Red Sox and St. Louis Cardinals. He also enjoyed a lengthly Major League coaching career with the New York Yankees, Kansas City Athletics, Cleveland Indians, Detroit Tigers and Houston Astros. Deal passed away on May 21, 2013, in Oklahoma City.

Stephen Demeter was born on Jan. 27, 1935, in Homer City, Pa. He was signed by the Detroit Tigers an an amateur free agent in 1953. He made his debut with the Tigers as a pinch hitter and third baseman. He played for both the Tigers and the Indians during his stint in the Majors. In 2009, Stephen was elected to the International League Hall of Fame. Demeter passed away on Feb. 3, 2013, in Parma, Ohio.

Robert "Ducky" Detweiler was born on Feb. 15, 1919, in Trumbauersville, Pa. He made his debut on Sept. 12, 1942, as a third baseman for the Boston Braves. Detweiler played with the Braves, St. Louis Cardinals and Philadelphia Athletics. Detweiler passed away on March 13, 2013 in Easton, Md.

Lee Eilbracht was born on March 22, 1924, in St. Louis. Eilbracht enjoyed a Minor League career with the Chicago Cubs before becoming the head baseball coach at the University of Illinois. Eilbracht spent 11 years coaching at Illiniois and was the winningest coach in Illiniois history. He was an Olympic coach in 1964 for the United States baseball team in Japan, and served as the first executive director for the American Baseball Coaches Association. Eilbracht passed away on Jan. 2, 2013, in Savoy, Ill.

Harry Elliot was born on Dec. 30, 1923, in San Francisco. After playing in the Minor Leagues for the Shreveport Sports, Elliot was called up by the St. Louis Cardinals as a pinch hitter and outfielder. He made his career debut on Aug. 1, 1953, with the St. Louis Cardinals and finished his two-year career with a .256 batting average. Elliot passed away on Aug. 9, 2013, in Little River, Kan.

Edward Erautt was born on Sept. 26, 1924, in Portland, Ore. He made his career debut with the Cincinnati Reds on April 16, 1947 as a pitcher. Although he spent most of his career playing for the Reds, Erautt also played one season with the St. Louis Cardinals. Erautt passed away on Oct. 27, 2013, in La Mesa, Calif.

Eugene Freese was born on Jan. 8, 1934, in Wheeling, W. Va. He was signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates as an amateur free agent in 1953. He made his career debut on April 13, 1955, with the Pirates as a third baseman, but he also played second base. Throughout his 12-year career Freese played for the Pirates, St. Louis Cardinals, Philadelphia Phillies, Chicago White Sox, Cincinnati Reds and Houston Astros. He finished his career with 115 home runs, 432 RBIs and a .254 batting average. Freese passed away on June 19, 2013, in New Orleans. 

William Glynn was born on July 30, 1925, in Sussex, N.J. He signed with the Philadelphia Phillies as an amateur free agent in 1946. He made his debut on Sept. 16, 1949. Glynn had a short career with the Phillies and went on to play for the Cleveland Indians. He ended his career with 10 home runs, 56 RBIs and a .249 batting average. Glynn passed away on Jan. 15, 2013, in San Diego.

Leslie "Lonnie" Goldstein was born on May 13, 1918, in Austin, Texas. He played briefly for the Cincinatti Reds during the 1943 and 1946 seasons as a first baseman. His career was interrupted by military service during World War II. Goldstein passed away on Jan. 28, 2013, in Fort Worth, Texas.

Richard "Dick" Gray was born on July 11, 1931, in Jefferson, Pa. He was signed as an amateur free agent in 1952 by the Brooklyn Dodgers. He made his career debut for the Los Angeles Dodgers on April 15, 1958, as a pinch hitter, but also played as a third baseman and shortstop. Gray was the first to hit a home run in Los Angeles Dodgers history, against the San Francisco Giants, as well as the first to hit a home run for the Dodgers in the Los Angeles Coliseum. He played for both the Dodgers and St. Louis Cardinals. Gray passed away on July 8, 2013, in Anaheim, Calif.

Charles "Bubba" Harris was born on Feb. 15, 1926, in Sulligent, Ala. He was signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates as an amateur free agent in 1943. He made his debut on April 29, 1948, as a pitcher with the Oakland Athletics, where he threw a perfect inning of relief. Harris ended his career with a 6-3 record and 4.84 ERA in 87 games. Harris passed away on Jan. 12, 2013, in Nobleton, Fla.

John "Jack" Harshman was born on July 12, 1927, in San Diego. He made his career debut on Sept. 16, 1948, with the New York Giants as a pinch hitter. He played for the Giants, Chicago White Sox, Baltimore Orioles, Boston Red Sox and Cleveland Indians. He finished with a career ERA of 3.50 and 21 home runs. Harshman passed away on Aug. 17, 2013, in Georgetown, Texas. 

Grady Hatton was born on Oct. 7, 1922, in Beaumont, Texas. He was signed by the Cincinnati Reds as an amateur free agent in 1946. He made his debut on April 16, 1946, with the Reds as a third baseman. Hatton played with many teams during his career, including the Chicago White Sox, Boston Red Sox, St. Louis Cardinals, Baltimore Orioles and Chicago Cubs. He ended his career with 91 home runs, 533 RBIs and a .251 batting average. After his career, Hatton was the manager for the Houston Astros and eventually became the team's vice president. Hatton passed away on April 11, 2013 in Warren, Texas.

Drungo Hazewood was born on Sept. 2, 1959, in Mobile, Ala. He was drafted by the Baltimore Orioles in the first round (19th pick) of the 1977 First-Year Player Draft. He made his career debut with the Orioles on Sept. 19, 1980, as a pinch runner and right fielder. Hazewood passed away on July 28, 2013, in Sacramento, Calif. 

James "Mike" Hegan was born on July 21, 1942, in Cleveland. He was signed by the New York Yankees in 1961 as an amateur free agent. He made his career debut on Sept. 13, 1964, for the Yankees as a first baseman and outfielder. He played for the Yankees, Seattle Pilots/Milwaukee Brewers and Oakland Athletics. In 1969, Hegan made an appearance in the All-Star Game, and he also won a World Series with the Athletics in 1972. Hegan passed away on Dec. 25, 2013, in Hilton Head, S.C. 

Enzo Hernandez was born on Febr. 12, 1949, in Valle de Guanape, Anzoaeui, Venezuela. He was signed by the Houston Astros as an amateur free agent in 1967. He made his debut on April 17, 1971, as a shortstop for the San Diego Padres. Enzo spent the majority of his career as the starting shortstop for the Padres and spent his last year in the Majors with the Los Angeles Dodgers. Hernandez passed away on Jan. 13, 2013 in El Tigre, Anzoategui, Venzuela.

Edward Herrmann was born on Aug. 27, 1946, in San Diego. He was signed by the Milwaukee Braves as an amateur free agent in 1964. He made his career debut on Sept. 1, 1967, with the Chicago White Sox as a pitcher. He played for the White Sox, New York Yankees, California Angels, Houston Astros and Montreal Expos over his 11-year career. He led the American League in intentional walks in 1972 with 19 and also made an appearance in the 1974 All-Star Game. Herrmann passed away on Dec. 22, 2013, in Poway, Calif. 

Earl Hersh was born on May 21, 1932, in Ebbvale, Md. He was signed by the Milwaukee Braves as an amateur free agent in 1953. He made his debut on Sept. 4, 1956, as a left fielder for the Braves. Following his career, Hersh was a high school teacher and coached multiple sports, including baseball. He eventually became the supervisor of physical education and athletics for the Carroll County Board of Education in Maryland. Hersh passed away on March 18, 2013, in Hanover, Pa.

Charles "Chuck" Hinton was born on May 3, 1934, in Rocky Mount, N.C. He was signed by the Baltimore Orioles as an amateur free agent in 1956. He made his debut on May 14, 1961, as a left fielder for the Washington Senators. During his career he also played for the California Angels and Cleveland Indians. Hinton ended his career with 113 home runs, 443 RBIs and a .264 batting average. A notable achievement during Hinton's career was that he was an All-Star for the American League in 1964. Following his career, Hinton coached the baseball team at Howard University for 28 years and was a founding member of the MLPBAA. Hinton passed away on Jan. 27, 2013, in Washington, D.C.

Glen Hobbie was born on April 24, 1936, in Witt, Ill. He was signed as an amateur free agent in 1955 by the Chicago Cubs. He made his career debut with the Cubs on Sept. 20, 1957, as a pitcher. Although most of his career was spent with the Cubs, Hobbie also played a season with the St. Louis Cardinals. He finished his eight-year career with a 4.20 ERA and a 62-81 record. Hobbie passed away on Aug. 9, 2013, in Springfield, Ill. 

Larry Johnson was born on Aug. 17, 1950, in Cleveland. He was drafted in the ninth round of the 1968 First-Year Player Draft by the Cleveland Indians. He made his career debut with the Indians on Oct. 3, 1972, as a catcher. Other than the Indians, he also played for the Montreal Expos and Chicago White Sox. Johnson passed away on May 26, 2013, in Tampa, Fla.

Daniel Kravitz was born on Dec. 21, 1930, in Lopez, Pa. He was signed as an amateur free agent in 1949 by the Pittsburgh Pirates. He made his career debut on April 17, 1956, with the Pirates as a catcher and pinch hitter. During his career he also played for the Kansas City Athletics. He finished his career with 10 home runs, 54 RBIs, and a .236 batting average. Kravitz passed away on June 19, 2013, in Danville, Pa.

John Kucks was born on July 27, 1932, in Hoboken, N.J. He was signed by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1952. He made his career debut with the Yankees on April 17, 1955, as a pitcher. Although most of his career was spent with the Yankees, he also played a season with the Kansas City Athletics. He finished his career having made an All-Star appearance in 1956, winning two World Series with the Yankees (1956, 1958) and posting a 4.10 ERA. Kucks passed away on Oct. 31, 2013, in Saddle River, N.J. 

Bradley Lesley was born on Sept. 11, 1958, in Turlock, Calif. He was drafted by the Cincinnati Reds in the first round, ninth pick of the 1978 First-Year Player Draft. He made his debut on July 31, 1982, with the Reds as a pitcher. Lesley spent the majority of his career with the Reds, but spent his final season with the Milwaukee Brewers. He ended his career with a 3.86 ERA and 46 strikeouts. Lesley passed away on April 27, 2013, in Marina Del Ray, Calif.

Frankie Libran was born on May 6, 1948, in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico. Libran was signed as an amateur free agent by the Chicago Cubs in 1968 and made his Major League debut on Sept. 3, 1969, for the San Diego Padres. Libran was known for being an all-around athlete, also playing professionally in basketball and volleyball. Libran passed away on May 16, 2013, in Mayaguez, Puerto Rico.

John Logan was born on March 23, 1926, in Endicott, N.Y. He was signed by the Boston Braves as an amateur free agent in 1947. He made his career debut with the Boston Braves on April 17, 1951, as a shortstop. He played for the Braves, Milwaukee Braves and Pittsburgh Pirates. Logan made four All-Star appearances with the National League, was the National League doubles leader in 1955, won a World Series with the Milwaukee Braves in 1957 and set the World Series record for most assists by shortstop in 1957. He finished his 13-year career with 93 home runs, 547 RBIs and a .268 batting average. Logan passed away on Aug. 9, 2013, in Milwaukee, Wisc.

Stanley Lopata was born on Sept. 12, 1925, in Delray, Mich. He was signed by the Philadelphia Phillies as an amateur free agent in 1946. He made is career debut on Sept. 19, 1948, with the Phillies as a catcher and first baseman. He played for the Phillies and Milwaukee Braves. He made two National League All-Star appearances in 1955 and 1956 and set the home run record for Phillies catchers with 32 in 1956. Lopata passed away on June 15, 2013, in Philadelphia. 

Donald Lund was born on May 18, 1923, in Detroit. He was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1945. He made his career debut with the Dodgers on July 3, 1945, as an outfielder. He played for the Dodgers, St. Louis Browns and Detroit Tigers. He finished his career with 15 home runs, 86 RBIs and a .240 batting average. Lund passed away on Dec. 10, 2013, in Ann Arbor, Mich.

Boris "Babe" Martin was born on March 28, 1920, in Seattle. He was signed as an amateur free agent in 1940 by the St. Louis Browns. He made his career debut with the St. Louis Browns on Sept. 25, 1944, as a left fielder, but also played first base and catcher. He played for the Browns and Boston Red Sox. Martin passed away on Aug. 1, 2013, in Tucson, Ariz. 

Raymond Martin was born on March 13, 1925, in Norwood, Mass. He signed with the Boston Braves as an amateur free agent in 1943. He made his debut on Aug. 15, 1943, as a pitcher for the Braves. In the final two games of his career Martin gave up no runs and no hits. He ended his career with a 2.45 ERA. Martin passed away on March 7, 2013, in his hometown, Norwood.

Justin Miller was born on Aug. 27, 1977, in Torrance, Calif. He was drafted by the Colorado Rockies in the fifth round of the 1997 First-Year Player Draft. He made his career debut with the Toronto Blue Jays on April 12, 2002, as a pitcher. He played for the Blue Jays, Florida Marlins, San Francisco Giants and Los Angeles Dodgers. Miller passed away on June 26, 2013, in Palm Harbor, Fla. 

Rodney Miller was born on Jan. 16, 1940, in Portland, Ore. He was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1957. He made his career debut on Sept. 28, 1957, with the Dodgers as a pinch hitter. After his season with the Dodgers, Miller spent four years in the Minor Leagues with a .242 average. Miller passed away on Nov. 8, 2013, in Cascade, Idaho.

Rudolph "Rudy" Minarcin was born on March 25, 1930, in North Vandergrift, Pa. He was signed in 1948 as an amateur free agent by the Philadelphia Phillies. He made his career debut on April 11, 1955, with the Cincinnati Redlegs as a pitcher. He played for the Redlegs and Boston Red Sox over his three-year career. Minarcin passed away on Oct. 15, 2013, in Cabot, Pa.

Ford "Moon" Mullen was born on Feb. 9, 1917, in Olympia, Wash. He made his debut on April 18, 1944, as a second baseman for the Philadelphia Phillies. Mullen had a short career but finished it with 464 at-bats, 31 RBIs and a .267 batting average. Following his career he was a teacher and coach at Olympia High School in Washington. Mullen passed away on Feb. 28, 2013, in Stanwood, Wash.

Stanley Musial was born on Nov. 21, 1920, in Donora, Pa. He was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals as an amateur free agent in 1938. He made his debut on Sept. 17, 1941, with the Cardinals as an outfielder and first baseman and went on to spend his entire 22-year career there. In Musial's early playing days he found instant success in the Major Leagues, winning two World Series crowns (1941, 1944) in his first four years, as well as earning the league MVP Award in 1943 after leading in hits, doubles, triples and batting average. Musial served in the Navy during World War II, causing him to miss the entire 1945 season, but was discharged in 1946 and returned to the Major Leagues without missing a beat. Following his return, Musial won five batting crowns in his first seven years back; in 1946 he led the NL in games, at-bats, hits, doubles, triples, average and won his second MVP Award and another World Series with the Cardinals. Stan "The Man" Musial retired with a .331 average, 475 home runs and was the first player to accumulate both 400 home runs and 3,000 hits. Musial was also the first man to appear in 3,000 National League games. Overall, Musial won seven National League batting crowns, made 24 All-Star Game appearances and holds the record with six All-Star Game home runs during his career. Following his Major League career, Musial was the general manager of the Cardinals in 1967, leading them to another World Series championship. Musial continued to play a role in the Cardinal's organization through 1980 while working in their front office. During his first year of eligibility in 1969, Musial was elected into the Hall of Fame with 93.2 percent of the vote. He was also inducted into the Pennsylvania Hall of Fame, the Missouri Sports Hall of Fame, the St. Louis Hall of Fame and the Missouri Hall of Fame. In 2010, President Barack Obama awarded him the Presidential Medal of Freedom for all of his contributions to the American nation. Not only was Musial honored in United States, but he was also honored within the Polish community. Musial was the first foreigner to receive the Polish government's Merited Champions Medal, their highest sports award, Poland's highest civilian honor and the Cavalier's Cross Order of Merit. Musial became the first to be inducted into the Polish-American Sports Hall of Fame in 1973 and is also in the Polish National Hall of Fame. Located in the Smithsonian Institution is the baseball that he hit for his 3,000th base hit. Musial passed away in St. Louis on Jan. 19, 2013, at the age of 92.

Barney Mussill was born on Oct. 1, 1919, in Bower Hill, Pa. Mussill was signed by the Philadelphia Phillies as an amateur free agent in 1938 and made his Major League debut on April 20, 1944, for the Phillies. He appeared in 16 games in the 1944 season before leaving baseball to pursue a career in sporting goods, opening a store in his hometown of River Rouge, Mich. Mussill passed away on Jan. 27, 2013, in Detroit.

Peter Naton was born on Sept. 9, 1931, in Flushing, N.Y. He was signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates as an amateur free agent in 1953. He made his career debut four days after signing on June 16, 1953, with the Pirates as a catcher. Following his career in the Majors, Naton spent five more years in the Minors, finishing with a Minor League career average of .244 and 43 home runs in 462 games. Naton passed away on Dec. 10, 2013, in Springfield, Mass. 

Daniel Osinski was born on Nov. 17, 1933, in Chicago. He was signed by the Cleveland Indians as an amateur free agent in 1952. He made his career debut with the Kansas City Athletics on April 11, 1962, as a pitcher. He played for the Athletics, Los Angeles Angels, Milwaukee Braves, Boston Red Sox, Chicago White Sox and Houston Astros. He finished his career with a 3.34 ERA. Osinski passed away on Sept. 13, 2013, in Sun City, Ariz. 

Andrew Pafko was born on Feb. 25, 1921, in Boyceville, Wisc. He made his career debut on Sept. 24, 1943, with the Chicago Cubs as an outfielder and third baseman. Over his 17-year career he played for Cubs, Brooklyn Dodgers and Milwaukee Braves. Pafko made five National League All-Star appearances and won a World Series with the Braves in 1957. He finished his career with a .285 batting average and 213 home runs in 1,852 games. Pafko passed away on Oct. 8, 2013, in Bridgman, Mich.

Michael Palagyi was born on July 4, 1917, in Conneaut, Ohio. He made his career debut with the Washington Senators on Aug. 18, 1939, as a pitcher. He played one season in the Majors and served in the U.S. Army during World War II following his baseball days. Palagyi passed away on Nov. 21, 2013, in Conneaut, Ohio. 

Clarence "Ace" Parker was born on May 17, 1912, in Portsmouth, Va. He made his Major League Baseball debut on April 24, 1937, for the Philadelphia Athletics as a pinch runner. After his first season with the Athletics, he joined the Brooklyn Dodgers of the NFL and made his pro football debut. He played one more season in the Majors and continued to play in the Minors while playing in the NFL. Parker served in the military during World War II, then returned to both the NFL and Minor League Baseball. After his playing career, Parker went on to be a head college baseball coach, leading Duke to the College World Series in 1953 and 1961. He was inducted into the College Football Hall of Fame and Pro Football Hall of Fame. Parker passed away on Nov. 6, 2013, in Portsmouth, Va.

Tony Pierce was born on Jan. 29, 1946, in Brunswick, Ga. Pierce was signed by the Kansas City Athletics as an amateur free agent in 1964 and made his Major League debut on April 14, 1967, for the Athletics. Pierce enjoyed a two-year Major League career and maintained a 3.25 ERA over 130 1/2 innings. Pierce passed away on Jan. 31, 2013, in Columbus, Ga.

Mario Ramirez was born on Sept. 12, 1957, in Yauco, Puerto Rico. Ramirez was signed by the New York Mets as an amateur free agent in 1976 and made his Major League debut on April 25, 1980. Over the course of his six-year career, he played for the Mets and Padres and hit four home runs. Ramirez passed away on Feb. 22, 2013, in Yauco, Puerto Rico.

Santiago Rosario was born on July 25, 1939, in Guayanilla, Puerto Rico. He was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals as an amateur free agent in 1960. He made his career debut on June 23, 1965, with the Kansas City Athletics as a pinch hitter and first baseman. He finished his career with a .235 batting average. Rosario passed away on Sept. 6, 2013, in Guayanilla, Puerto Rico.

Marvin Rotblatt was born on Oct. 18, 1927, in Chicago. He was signed by the Chicago White Sox as an amateur free agent in 1948. He made his career debut on July 4, 1948, as a pitcher. He played for the White Sox throughout his three-year career. Rotblatt passed away on July 16, 2013, in Niles, Ill. 

John "Bob" Savage was born on Dec. 1, 1921, in Manchester, N.H. He made his career debut as a pitcher with the Philadelphia Athletics on June 24, 1942. He played for the Athletics and St. Louis Browns. Following his Major League days, he played five years in the Minor Leagues. Savage passed away on July 26, 2013, in Berlin, N.H.

George Scott was born on March 23, 1944, in Greenville, Miss. He was signed as an amateur free agent in 1962 by the Boston Red Sox. He made his career debut with the Red Sox on April 12, 1966, as a first baseman. He also played for the Milwaukee Brewers, New York Yankees and Kansas City Royals. He finished his 14-year career as a two-time American League All-Star, eight-time AL Gold Glove Winner, two-time AL total bases leader, AL home run leader and AL RBIs leader. Following his Major League career, he played and managed in Mexico. Scott passed away on July 28, 2013, in Greenville.

Lou Sleater was born on Sept. 8, 1926, in St. Louis. Sleater was signed by the Boston Braves as an amateur free agent in 1946 and made his Major League debut on April 25, 1950, for the St. Louis Browns. Over his nine-year career, Sleater played for the Browns, Senators, Athletics, Braves, Tigers and Orioles, tallying four home runs and 152 strikeouts. Sleater passed away on March 25, 2013, in Timonium, Md.

Mark Small was born on Nov. 12, 1967, in Portland, Ore. He was drafted by the Houston Astros in the 17th round of the 1989 First-Year Player Draft. He made his career debut on April 5, 1996, with the Astros as a pitcher. Small passed away on Oct. 22, 2013, in Edmonds, Wash.

Bob Smith was born on Feb. 1, 1931, in Woodsville, N.H. Smith was signed by the Boston Red Sox as an amateur free agent in 1948 and made his Major League debut on April 29, 1955, for the Pittsburgh Pirates. Smith spent time with the Pirates, Tigers, Cardinals and Red Sox over the course of his career. He finished with a career ERA of 4.03 in 418 appearances. Smith passed away on April 1, 2013, in Augusta, Ga.

Jose Sosa was born on Dec. 28, 1952, in Santo Domingo, Distrito Nacional, Dominican Republic. He was signed by the Houston Astros as an amateur free agent in 1970. He made his career debut on July 22, 1975, with the Astros as a pitcher. In his first year playing with the Astros, he went 1-2 with a 4.02 ERA while going 3-for-9 at the plate. Sosa passed away on June 8, 2013, in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. 

William Stewart was born on April 12, 1928, in Bay City, Mich. He was signed by the Philadelphia Athletics as an amateur free agent in 1949. He made his career debut on April 17, 1955, with the Kansas City Athletics as a pinch hitter and outfielder. Stewart passed away on Sept. 25, 2013. 

Jake Striker was born on Oct. 23, 1933, in New Washington, Ohio. Striker was signed by the Cleveland Indians as an amateur free agent in 1952 and made his Major League debut on Sept. 25, 1959, for the Indians, pitching 6 2/3 innings and getting the win. Striker also spent time with the Chicago White Sox during his career. Striker passed away on March 7, 2013, in Dallas, Ore.

Russell Sullivan was born on Feb. 19, 1923, in Fredericksburg, Va. He made his career debut as a left fielder for the Detroit Tigers on Sept. 8, 1951. During his second season in the Majors, in 1952, he had a 15-game stint with a .327 batting average and three home runs. Sullivan passed away on Nov. 2, 2013, in Fredericksburg, Va.

Fred Talbot was born on June 28, 1941, in Washington, D.C. Talbot was signed by the Chicago White Sox as an amateur free agent in 1959 and made his Major League debut on Sept. 28, 1963, for the White Sox. Over the course of his eight-year career, Talbot spent time with the Yankees, Athletics, Pilots and White Sox. Talbot posted a career ERA of 4.12 over 853 innings pitched. Talbot passed away on Jan. 11, 2013, in Falls Church, Va.

Harry Taylor was born on Dec. 2, 1935, in San Angelo, Texas. Taylor was signed by the Kansas City Athletics as an amateur free agent in 1957 and made his Major League debut on Sept. 17, 1957, for the Athletics. Taylor posted a career ERA of 3.12 and made two appearances for the Athletics. Taylor passed away on Jan. 24, 2013, in Fort Worth, Texas.

Jake Thies was born on April 1, 1926, in St. Louis. Thies made his Major League debut on April 24, 1954, for the Pittsburgh Pirates. Thies spent two seasons with the Pirates and posted a career ERA of 3.90, throwing 57 strikeouts over 134 innings. Thies passed away on Feb. 10, 2013, in Florissant, Mo.

Carl Thomas was born on May 28, 1932, in Minneapolis. Thomas was signed by the Cleveland Indians as an amateur free agent in 1956 and made his Major League debut on April 19, 1960, for the Indians. Thomas pitched two no-hitters while at the University of Arizona and is their all-time leader in strikeouts with 422. Thomas passed away on March 7, 2013, in Phoenix.

William Tremel was born on July 4, 1929, in Lilly, Pa. He made his career debut as a pitcher for the Chicago Cubs on June 12, 1954. He spent all three years in his Major League career with the Cubs, appearing in 57 games and going 4-2 with a 4.05 ERA. Tremel passed away on Dec. 22, 2013, in Hollidaysburg, Pa. 

Gus Triandos was born on July 30, 1930, in San Francisco. Triandos was signed by the New York Yankees as an amateur free agent in 1948 and made his Major League debut on Aug. 13, 1953, for the Yankees. Over his 13-year career, Triandos played for the Orioles, Tigers, Phillies, Astros and Yankees and was a three-time American League All-Star. Triandos was elected into the Baltimore Orioles Hall of Fame in 1981 and has a street named after him in Timonium, Md. Triandos passed away on March 28, 2013, in San Jose, Calif.

Virgil "Fire" Trucks was born April 26, 1917, in Birmingham, Ala. Trucks was signed by the Detroit Tigers as an amateur free agent in 1938 and made his Major League debut on Sept. 27, 1941, for the Tigers. During his 17-year career, Trucks pitched for the Tigers, White Sox, Athletics, Yankees and Browns. Trucks won 177 games over 17 years and was a two-time All-Star. Trucks also pitched two no-hitters, both in 1952. Trucks passed away on March 23, 2013, in Calera, Ala.

"Bullet Bob" Turley was born Sept. 19, 1930, in Troy, Ill. Turley was signed by the St. Louis Browns as an amateur free agent in 1948 and made his Major League debut on Sept. 29, 1951, for the Browns. Over his 12-year career, Turley pitched for the Browns, Yankees, Orioles, Angels and Red Sox, recording 110 wins, 1,265 strikeouts and posting a career 3.64 ERA. Turley was a three-time All-Star, the 1958 Cy Young award winner and won two World Series with the Yankees (1956 and 1958) and was named the World Series MVP in the 1958 Series. Turley passed away on March 30, 2013, in Atlanta.

Preston Ward was born on July 24, 1927, in Columbia, Mo. He was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1944. He made his career debut on April 20, 1948, with the Dodgers as a first baseman, but also played outfield and third base. He played for the Dodgers, Chicago Cubs, Pittsburg Pirates, Cleveland Indians and Kansas City Athletics. He finished his nine-year career with 50 home runs and a .253 batting average. Ward passed away on June 2, 2013, in Las Vegas.

George Werley was born on Sept. 8, 1938, in St. Louis. He was signed in 1956 by the Baltimore Orioles as an amateur free agent. He made his career debut with the Orioles on Sept. 29, 1956, as a pitcher. Werley passed away on Nov. 21, 2013, in St. Louis.

Fred Whitfield was born on Jan. 7, 1938, in Vandiver, Ala. Whitfield was signed by the St. Louis Cardinals as an amateur free agent in 1956 and made his Major League debut on May 27, 1962, for the Cardinals. During his nine-year career, Whitfield played for the Cardinals, Indians, Reds and Expos, hit 108 home runs and had 356 RBIs. Whitfield passed away on Jan. 31, 2013, in Gadsden, Ala.

Earl Williams was born on July 14, 1948, in Newark, N.J. Williams was drafted by the Milwaukee Braves in the first round of the 1965 First-Year Player Draft and made his Major League debut on Sept. 13, 1970, for the Braves. Over the course of his eight-year career, Williams played for the Braves, Orioles, Athletics and Expos and hit 138 home runs and had 457 RBIs. Williams also won the Rookie of the Year award in 1971 with the Braves. Williams passed away on Jan. 28, 2013, in Somerset, N.J.

William "Billy" Williams was born on June 13, 1932, in Newberry, S.C. He was signed by the Cleveland Indians as an amateur free agent in 1954. He made his career debut as a right fielder with the Seattle Pilots on Aug. 15, 1969. Prior to his Major League career, he played nine years in the Minor Leagues. After his Major League career, he returned to baseball as a Minor League manager and a coach of the Cleveland Indians. Williams passed away on June 11, 2013, in Berkley, Calif. 

George "Red" Witt was born on Nov. 9, 1931, in Long Beach, Calif. Witt was signed by the Brooklyn Dodgers as an amateur free agent in 1950 and made his Major League debut on Sept. 21, 1957, for the Pittsburgh Pirates. Over his six years in the Majors, Witt pitched for the Pirates, the Colt .45s and the Angels, and struck out 156 batters, posting a career ERA of 4.32. Witt passed away on Jan. 30, 2013, in Long Beach.

Leonard "Len" Yochim was born on Oct. 16, 1928, in New Orleans. Yochim was signed by the Pittsburgh Pirates as an amateur free agent in 1947 and made his Major League debut on Sept. 18, 1951, for the Pirates. Yochim pitched for two seasons with the Pirates and has the distinction of being the first pitcher to throw a no-hitter in Venezuelan professional baseball while with the Caracas Lions. Yochim went on to work for the Pirates organization for the next 38 years as a scout and as a senior adviser for player personnel. Yochim passed away on May 11, 2013, in New Orleans.

Updated: 8/31/16