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WADA head supports process in A-Rod suspension

WADA head supports process in A-Rod suspension play video for WADA head supports process in A-Rod suspension

The World Anti-Doping Agency had high praise for the process that led to Alex Rodriguez's suspension for the 2014 season.

In a statement released Tuesday, WADA president Sir Craig Reedie commended arbitrator Fredric Horowitz for his decision and his means of coming to it.

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"MLB has approached the matter in a professional manner throughout, and has set a high standard for how investigations should be pursued in anti-doping cases," Reedie's statement said. "We look forward to continuing our close relationship with the MLB as we aim to protect the rights of the clean athlete and support doping-free sport."

Rodriguez, who was initially suspended for 211 games in August, had his suspension reduced to 162 games on Saturday. The Yankees third baseman has since filed suit against both Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association in an attempt to have the suspension overturned.

WADA was quick to say that it believes the entire process was handled professionally.

"The 'clear and convincing evidence' found by arbitrator Horowitz in this case proves that non-analytical methods have an increasingly important role to play in uncovering those athletes who have breached anti-doping rules," Reedie said. "Sharing information and intelligence is something WADA continues to encourage its own stakeholders to do in order to help protect the rights of the clean athlete."

WADA backed the initial decision to suspend Rodriguez last August and said in the statement that it has given MLB its full support "since details first came to light one year ago."

"The message from this case is clear -- sport no longer relies solely on a positive test to bring those that wish to rob sport of its true values to account," Reedie said. "This case proves that the sharing of evidence and intelligence can prove invaluable in keeping sport fair and clean for the vast majority."

AJ Cassavell is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @ajcassavell. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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