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Arroyo speaks out on supplement use

Arroyo speaks out on supplement use

Reds pitcher Bronson Arroyo said in Wednesday's edition of the USA Today newspaper that he takes "10 to 12" different types of supplements a day, up to 16 when he pitches, that several are not approved by Major League Baseball, and that he's not concerned with what anyone might think about it.

"I have a lot of guys in (the locker room) who think I'm out of (my) mind because I'm taking a lot of things not on the (MLB-approved) list," Arroyo told the paper. "There's a caffeine drink I take from a company that (former teammate) Curt Schilling introduced me to in '05. I take some Korean ginseng and a few other proteins out there that are not certified. But I haven't failed any tests, so I figured I'm good."

Arroyo, 32, also admitted to taking the now-banned supplement androstenedione in 1998 until it was banned in 2004.

"I took androstenedione the same way I took my multivitamins," Arroyo told USA Today. "I didn't really know if this was a genius move by Mark McGwire to cover up the real [stuff] he was taking, but it made me feel unbelievable. I felt like a monster."

Arroyo has already made headlines recently by saying he believes his name is probably on the 2003 list of 104 players who tested positive for performance-enhancing drugs. In the USA Today article, he elaborates, saying his name is probably on that list "for taking andro contaminated with steroids."

Also in the USA Today piece, Arroyo admits that he took amphetamines from 1998 to 2006.

In an extended interview, Arroyo, who was with the Red Sox when they won the World Series in 2004, also offered opinions on how steroid use by baseball players is viewed by the public and by MLB.

"If Mark McGwire is hitting 60 homers, the only thing that matters is his performance," Arroyo told the paper. "People don't own teams to lose money. If you ask any owner whether they would rather make $20 million and come in last place or lose $20 million and win a World Series, there's only one guy who honestly would take that championship: George Steinbrenner [of the Yankees]. Nobody else."

Arroyo said he had no regrets and would continue to test the boundaries of the system by taking the supplements.

"I do what I want to do and say what I want to say," Arroyo told the paper. "But society has made this such a tainted thing. The media has made it where people look at it in such a super-negative light. I've always been honest. I'm not going to stop now.

"People can think what they want of me," he said.

Doug Miller is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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