Extra bases

• Maddon loaded his lineup with right-handers against A's righty Jarrod Parker on Saturday, most notably batting Ryan Roberts second, using Shelley Duncan at DH and sitting lefty hitter Kelly Johnson. Matt Joyce and James Loney were the only left-handed hitters in the starting lineup, along with switch-hitter Ben Zobrist, and Maddon attributed that to the team's "intel" that Parker is mostly split-neutral.

Maddon wasn't kidding, either. Just look at Parker's batting lines against right-handed hitters: .264/.328/.375 (.702 OPS), and lefty hitters: .255/.325/.374 (.698 OPS).

• Maddon reiterated Saturday that Luke Scott (strained right calf) will run again Sunday after doing so Friday and easing his workload Saturday. After Scott's workout with head athletic trainer Ron Porterfield on Sunday, the Rays should be able to make a decision about when to start his rehab assignment.

• The Rays had a busy Saturday morning in the Tampa Bay community. Outfielder Sam Fuld took part in a question-and-answer session at Diabetes Family Day, hosted by the All Children's Hospital Endocrinology and Diabetes Department and the Tampa Bay JDRF Center.

Loney and his wife, Nadia, recorded a PSA for the Guardian ad Litem program, which protects the rights and advocates for the best interests of abused or neglected children involved in a court proceedings. And Longoria met hundreds of children from the Belmont Heights and Cross Bayou Little Leagues as part of Red Bull's "Tampa's Got Wings" program that raised $80,000 for the two leagues.

• Desmond Jennings turned an unassisted, inning-ending double play in the third inning Saturday night, snagging Coco Crisp's flyout to center field and then running over first base on his way back to the dugout. Eric Sogard had been at first base but was running on contact, giving Jennings as long as he needed to jog into the infield.

Jennings became the first Rays outfielder to ever turn an unassisted double play and the first Major League center fielder to complete an unassisted double play at first base since Pittsburgh's Andy Van Slyke did it on on July 7, 1992.

Adam Berry is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @adamdberry. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.