Walter Johnson's family puts items up for auction

Walter Johnson's family puts items up for auction

The family of late Hall of Fame pitcher Walter Johnson has decided to place several pieces of memorabilia from Johnson's career up for auction on Saturday at Heritage Auctions in New York, according to The Associated Press.

The highlight of the items up for sale is a one-of-a-kind ticket to Game 7 of the 1924 World Series for Row 1, Section B, Seat 7 of the lower grandstand at Griffith Stadium. Johnson entered the game in the ninth inning and pitched four shutout innings to earn the series-clinching win.

The ticket, which had been sitting in one of 32 scrapbooks originally created by Johnson's wife, Hazel Lee Roberts, is unique in that it was never torn in two by a ticket-taker and is the only one fully intact known to still exist.

Other items being placed up for auction by Johnson's daughter, Carolyn Thomas, and her son, Hank Thomas, include a personalized framed copy of Johnson's plaque from his Hall of Fame induction, a handwritten congratulatory letter from Ty Cobb, the "Notice to Player of Release or Transfer" document signed by Senators owner Clark Griffith after Johnson's final season in 1927 and an engraved six-piece tea set commemorating Johnson's 20th anniversary of signing with the club.

Though the family has decided to part with some of the memorabilia, Carolyn and Hank plan to keep some of the more sentimental pieces. Among the pieces that will not be placed up for auction are the first postcard sent from Johnson to his future wife, as well as a foot-high bronze statue of Johnson that is part of the décor in Carolyn's house.

Johnson, who was inducted in the inaugural Hall of Fame class in 1936, remains second on the all-time wins list with 417, behind only Cy Young (511). He recorded three Triple Crown seasons, won two MVP Awards in 1913 and '24, threw one no-hitter and led the American League in strikeouts 12 times during his 21-year career with the Senators.

Paul Casella is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @paul_casella. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.