Reyes shakes off sore hand, runs hit streak to 26

Reyes shakes off sore hand, runs hit streak to 26

NEW YORK -- Not much has slowed down Jose Reyes during his career-long hitting streak. But a sore right hand is giving the Marlins' shortstop some trouble.

Batting left-handed, Reyes went deep with two outs in the first inning on Wednesday night, extending his streak to 26 games. The 26-game hit streak is the longest by a reigning batting champion since Joe DiMaggio's MLB-record 56-game streak in 1941.

Reyes jammed his hand -- between his thumb and index finger -- while facing Gio Gonzalez on Friday night in the second game of a doubleheader in Washington.

"Jose, his hand does not feel too good, but he says he wants to play," manager Ozzie Guillen said. "He wants to be on the field. But we're playing it by ear.

"I don't want to get him to go out there and just be a hero when he can't. He's the best guy swinging the bat right now on the club. Right now, missing him in the lineup is just another big hole."

Reyes' streak is tied with Emilio Bonifacio, who ranks second on the team's all-time list. Bonifacio hit in 26 straight a year ago.

Reyes passed Kevin Millar, who hit in 25 straight in 2002. The club record is 35 games by Luis Castillo, also set in '02.

The way he's hitting, Reyes doesn't want to be out of the lineup.

"I told Ozzie today that I've missed so many games in my career," Reyes said. "If I can play, I want to be out there. Right now, I feel good at the plate."

Reyes says the discomfort mainly comes when he is batting from the right side, against left-handers.

"For the rest of the season, I don't expect that hand to be good," Guillen said. "It might be better, but it's not going to be good. But we'll see how he feels.

"Reyes is the type of player who has the privilege to tell me when he can play and when he cannot play. Only a few players can say that here. This kid, he's playing every day and not complaining. He wants to be on the field. He told me he missed so much time in his career because of injuries. He didn't want to come out because of that one."

Joe Frisaro is a reporter for MLB.com. He writes a blog, called The Fish Pond. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.