Mets to release new merchandise for 50th anniversary

Mets to release new merchandise for 50th anniversary

Mets to release new merchandise for 50th anniversary
CHICAGO -- The Mets and the Council of Fashion Designers of America, Inc., will collaborate on a new Mets merchandise collection to celebrate the 50th anniversaries of both organizations.

These items will go on sale July 24, and only be available at Citi Field and Edition01.com. The items at Citi Field will be available at the Mets Team Store and Majestic Store on the stadium's field level.

Net proceeds will be divided between the Mets Foundation and CFDA Foundation.

Items available include T-shirts, tank tops and sweatshirts, which were designed by CFDA designers Billy Reid, Yigal Azrouël, Scott Haan and Rogan Gregory for Loomstate, as well as Sam Shipley and Jeff Halmos for Shipley & Halmos.

"The Mets are thrilled to celebrate our golden anniversary in a unique, fashion-forward partnership with the CFDA that will raise money for charity," said Mets executive vice president of business operations Dave Howard in a release. "We would like to thank Major League Baseball and our partners at ARAMARK for making this unprecedented collaboration possible."

"We are excited to be working with the New York Mets on a CFDA member-designed mini collection commemorating our 50th anniversaries," said CFDA chief executive Steven Kolb in a release. "The creativity of our designers is a fresh approach to team merchandise while supporting charitable efforts of both organizations."

The Mets will host the entire CFDA membership for the July 24 game against the Nationals in celebration of the launch.

"Celebrating the Mets through the eyes of the CFDA designers is the perfect tribute to the team I have loved since [I was] a child," Edition01 co-founder Jessica Wilpon-Kamel said in a release. "I am enormously grateful to all those who have shared their talents to commemorate the anniversary."

Cash Kruth is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @cashkruth. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.