Phils will host Mets if tiebreaker needed

Mets lose tiebreaker coin flip

NEW YORK -- Once the Mets play their 162nd game, Shea Stadium will not be the site of any other regular-season game. If a one-game playoff between the Mets and the Phillies is necessary to determine the National League East championship, it will be played at Citizens Bank Park on Sept. 29. That much was determined by the flip of a coin on Friday afternoon at the Major League Baseball offices in Manhattan.

TIEBREAKER SCENARIOS
AMERICAN LEAGUE

Playoff for AL East
Tampa Bay at Boston

Playoff for AL Central
Minnesota at Chicago

Playoff for AL Wild Card
Minnesota at Boston

NATIONAL LEAGUE

Playoff for NL East
New York at Philadelphia

Playoff for NL Central
Chicago Cubs at Milwaukee

Playoff for NL West
Arizona at Los Angeles

Playoff for NL Wild Card
Milwaukee at Philadelphia
Milwaukee at Houston
Milwaukee at New York
Milwaukee at St. Louis
Houston at Philadelphia
St. Louis at Philadelphia
Houston at St. Louis

The game will be played only if the Mets and Phillies are tied for the division lead and the NL Wild Card team comes from the Central or West division. If the Mets and Phillies tie for first place and have better records than the runners-up in the other divisions, the Mets will be the East champions based on their 11-7 record in head-to-head competition against the Phillies. No one-game playoff would happen in that case.

The Mets lost the coin flip to the Phillies last season, too, but no game was necessary because Philadelphia won the division championship outright.

The Mets lost the coin flip in 1999 as well and had to play the Reds in a one-game playoff in Cincinnati. They won that game, 5-0, to advance to NLDS against the Diamondbacks.

An extra game to determine a division championship or a Wild Card berth is not considered a postseason game. Such games are regular-season games, and all performances in them apply only to regular-season statistics.

Marty Noble is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.