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Replay overturns HR in Mariners-Yanks game

Replay overturns HR in Mariners-Yanks game

Replay overturns HR in Mariners-Yanks game
NEW YORK -- An instant-replay review overturned what was initially ruled a two-run home run by Seattle's Mike Carp in the ninth inning of the Yankees' 6-2 win on Saturday, changing it to an RBI double.

Carp, who had homered off Yankees starter Phil Hughes in the seventh inning, hit a fly ball to right off left-handed reliever Boone Logan. First-base umpire Scott Barry called it a home run, initially allowing Kyle Seager, who had singled, and Carp to score. But upon further review, crew chief Gary Darling ruled the ball a double. He allowed Seager to score and placed Carp at second base.

"Off the bat, I assumed double," Carp said. "But it got a little higher than I thought it would, and for a second I thought it went out, and I was excited when the umpires signaled. But after watching the tape, not enough juice. One more inch. It hit right on the corner. I'll do an extra pushup tomorrow."

Replays showed the ball hit the top of the right-field wall and bounced back into play. Nick Swisher fielded the ball and threw back into the infield, but the umpires said that Seager would have scored.

But even the replay review could not remove all controversy. Yankees manager Joe Girardi, who argued briefly with Darling on the field, said after the game that he disagreed with the decision to allow Seager to score.

"It's unfortunate that Boonie gives up an earned run there," Girardi said. "It doesn't hurt us in the game. We're about wins, but guys care about what they give up. That's the bottom line, they have pride in their work. "

Logan, who said it was a "real bad call," appreciated his manager's support.

"That's how Joe is," Logan said. "He's got a lot of confidence in me. And after he argued a little bit and came to the mound, I was like, 'Leave me in, leave me in. First base is open and this lineup is full of lefties.' And he did, and I got the outs and ended the game."

Thomas Boorstein is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @MLBoorstein. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.

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