Packers' Rodgers speaks in support of Braun

Packers' Rodgers speaks in support of Braun

Packers' Rodgers speaks in support of Braun
The Super Bowl MVP is standing behind the National League MVP.

Packers quarterback Aaron Rodgers spoke out in support of the Brewers' Ryan Braun in an interview with ESPN Radio in Milwaukee on Thursday, lending support for Braun as allegations connected with a positive test for a banned substance play out.

"I was very surprised the news came out the way it did," Rodgers said. "You would think that there would be some sort of confidentiality surrounding the situation, because he is appealing it. Other than that, I don't really want to comment a whole lot on the allegations or whatnot. I would say I 100 percent support Ryan and believe in him, and it's not going to affect our friendship in the least. I'm 100 percent supporting him and behind him and believe in everything that he says."

Rodgers and Braun have formed a good relationship -- the former said Thursday the latter is "probably my best athlete friend" -- and they keep in touch throughout the year.

Rodgers said he's seen Braun's work ethic, and believes that Braun would not use a banned substance to get an edge.

"I've been in the locker room, and I've seen him working out and stuff," Rodgers said. "It's just ridiculous, the allegations. ... I don't know exactly what all is out there, but I just am trusting that my good friend has not been using anything illegal, and I'm very confident that's the case because I know how much he cares about the integrity of the game and wouldn't do anything to jeopardize that."

ESPN.com reported on Saturday that a performance-enhancing drug triggered Braun's failed test, given as part of Major League Baseball's Joint Drug Prevention and Treatment Policy.

On Sunday, however, a source familiar with the situation told MLB.com it was not a performance-enhancing drug that led to the violation.

Evan Drellich is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @EvanDrellich. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.