October Confidential: D-backs

Rival players offer inside look at facing NL Wild Card club

October Confidential: D-backs

How do you beat the D-backs? MLB.com asked rival players from around Major League Baseball to offer an inside look at how best to face the NL Wild Card.

Zack Greinke
"I don't want to call him a nibbler, because he throws hard. He's 92-93 on good days, and he hits every spot. He's really good at it. He's made a lot of money doing that. He's got that cutter out, two-seamer in, and they're always right on or off the plate. He also has that big hard, sharp, slower curveball. He gets people off balance, and he's smart."
-- NL West outfielder

"He's a guy that really, really does his homework on hitters, and he knows all of your weaknesses. He's also one of the better athletes on the mound. He controls the running game very well, he controls the bunting game very well, and he's very athletic as far as repeating his arm slot. He doesn't make many mistakes over the plate, and he really attacks your weaknesses."
-- NL West infielder

Greinke's dominant outing

Robbie Ray
"Two years ago, he was a different pitcher. He threw his fastball a ton. It's a good fastball, but it's straight. So it wasn't that difficult to hit when it was his only pitch. Once he started mixing in his other pitches, now you don't know what he's throwing. They all come out the same. You can't just sit on the fastball anymore."
-- NL West infielder

"Why he's become so good this year is that he's throwing 97, up and in to guys, and he's hitting that spot. He's having a lot of success doing it. I don't know if he saw what [Clayton] Kershaw was doing or if he just started doing it himself, but it's similar."
-- NL West outfielder

Ray stifles Dodgers, K's 14

Patrick Corbin
"He's a cross-firing lefty who's got good velo. He can run it in on your hands, and he creates a lot of angle. He's a lot like [Madison] Bumgarner, with a little more velo. Obviously, he doesn't locate pitches like Bumgarner. But he's got that type of arm angle … and he comes right after hitters."
-- NL West infielder

Fernando Rodney
"He is an effectively wild-type pitcher with his fastball and a changeup that's one of the best in the game. To feature a fastball that makes you uncomfortable, then mix in the changeup, that's what makes him a very good pitcher. He's just max effort with his fastball. It can go anywhere. He's a guy you're already uncomfortable hitting against, and then his changeup is incredible."
-- NL West infielder

Archie Bradley
"He throws hard. He throws gas. ... It's not crazy movement, but he's got a lot of life on his fastball and a good curveball. … Any time a guy's throwing that hard, it's just not easy to adjust to his curveball, whatever he's throwing it at."
-- NL West infielder

Bradley's first save

Paul Goldschmidt
"He hits the ball so well to the other side. You could go down and away, he'll handle that pitch well. Then, you go up and in, he'll handle that pitch, too. You have to change his timing. You have to change the way you pitch to him from the first time to the second time. He's obviously a tough hitter."
-- NL West starter

J.D. Martinez
"He can hurt you by driving the ball out of the park the opposite way. Those guys are always hard to prepare for, because when they can do damage the other way, you can't leave a heater out over the plate, or he can hit it to right field with authority. You've got to slow him down, speed him up, slow him down, speed him up. You've got to get the ball off his barrel. … He does damage with mistakes. He doesn't just hit singles."
-- NL West reliever

Must C: Martinez's four homers

Jake Lamb
"He can hit a home run at any moment. You make a mistake, he does damage. It's about staying away from the mistake pitch, which isn't easy, because he's got a lot of areas where he can do damage. That's what makes it tough."
-- NL West reliever

David Peralta
"It's a tough at-bat. As a pitcher, you try to use your strengths, and if you can execute your strengths, you're going to be good. But he's going to probably foul off a few pitches and make it tough on you. He'll grind out six, seven pitches, then he gets a hit. But you feel like if you stay to your strengths, you can get this guy out."
-- NL West reliever