Guillen set to be part of rare managerial trade

Guillen set to be part of rare managerial trade

CHICAGO -- If Ozzie Guillen assumes the Florida Marlins managerial throne in the next few days, as he is fully expected to do, then the White Sox and Marlins have agreed upon compensation for his departure.

A source told MLB.com that the players coming to the White Sox figure to be utility infielder Ozzie Martinez and a Minor League pitcher, after Guillen was released from the one year remaining on his contract per his request to pursue other opportunities.

Receiving compensation for a manager is not exactly a common occurrence across the ranks of Major League Baseball. In fact, it's very rare. Try only four times rare, including Guillen.

On Nov. 5, 1976, Chuck Tanner was traded by the A's to the Pirates in exchange for catcher Manny Sanguillen. Tanner went on to lead the Pirates and their famous "We are Family" characters to the 1979 World Series title, with the Pirates rallying from a 3-1 deficit to defeat the Orioles.

Tanner was the second managerial trade, and this move wasn't nearly as strange as the first one. On Aug. 3, 1960, Jimmy Dykes was moved midseason by the Tigers to the Indians for fellow manager Joe Gordon.

Almost 26 years after the Tanner move, Lou Piniella and the Mariners were involved in the third deal and the last until Guillen. Piniella returned closer to home and tried to give a lift to the struggling Tampa Bay Devil Rays, with productive outfielder Randy Winn moving to Seattle on Oct. 28, 2002.

Piniella managed from 2003-05 with the Rays and never won more than 70 games. Winn put together two-plus solid seasons with the Mariners, hitting .295, .286 and .275 respectively, while producing 31 combined homers and 193 RBIs.

All three of these main managers involved had a Chicago connection. Tanner ran the White Sox from 1970-75, prior to his one year in Oakland, while Piniella won two division titles as the Cubs leader.

Now, it's Guillen on the move, one year after the Marlins and White Sox couldn't agree on compensation for Florida to pursue the outspoken manager. It was a move that needed to be made, with both sides needing to go in a different direction.

"There's never ever been any doubt to what everyone's intentions are around here," White Sox general manager Ken Williams said. "That's to win. And to win in a big way. Sometimes it gets in the way."

"Anybody in Chicago or anyone in baseball blame Kenny or [White Sox chairman] Jerry [Reinsdorf] or front office people, they're wrong," Guillen said. "That's the decision I make obviously for a lot of reasons. I will still live in Chicago. My home is in Chicago. But the best thing about it, I leave here with my head up."

Scott Merkin is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Being Ozzie Guillen, and follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.