Stanton ovation: HR robbed, blanking Nats

Stanton ovation: HR robbed, blanking Nats

MIAMI -- It's no secret Giancarlo Stanton and outfield walls haven't quite gotten along this year, but the Marlins All-Star right fielder's moment of triumph finally came in the final out of Wednesday night's 7-0 win over the Nationals.

Stanton beelined toward the right-field corner on a high fly ball off the bat of Brian Goodwin in the ninth. In one swift move, the 6-foot-6 outfielder leaped and snagged the ball before it could land over the fence. He traveled 94 feet to make the catch, per Statcast™.

"I wasn't sure if it was going over, but I knew to give a good pass at it regardless," Stanton said.

Stanton has had trouble all year near walls on balls such as that.

Santana's two-run homer

In Milwaukee on July 1, he came inches from robbing Domingo Santana of a homer. The ball popped out of his glove, however, and fell over the fence.

And on July 16, Stanton lost his glove over the right-center fence against the Dodgers on a Chris Taylor triple, and he had to use a different one.

Stanton loses glove over wall

"I've missed a couple this past month," Stanton said. "So it was good to get one."

One of the first to greet Stanton after the catch was Christian Yelich. He and fellow outfielder Marcell Ozuna have been giving Stanton a hard time about coming up short on balls at the warning track.

"I told him, 'About time,'" Yelich said. "Because he's run up against the wall and just missed a few of them. Threw his glove over on one of them. We were all giving him a hard time about it. But that was a great play."

Ozuna, who robbed a homer of his own in the game Stanton lost his glove, said he's been working with Stanton on his craft. Stanton's strength is his height, Ozuna said, and it helps that the right-field fence at Marlins Park is just seven feet high.

"He's too tall," Ozuna said. "He can just jump and he's got it, especially on that little fence."

That same height and leaping ability is what made Stanton a threat on the football field as a wide receiver at Notre Dame High School in Sherman Oaks, Calif.

He ultimately chose baseball, a sport in which his only defender Wednesday night was a familiar bright green padded fence, which he finally conquered.

"Well maybe I would've caught the other one if that background would've helped," Stanton said. "But yeah, it's similar. Similar to like going up against defenders."

Patrick Pinak is a reporter for MLB.com based in Miami. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.