Mitchell Report details plan to move on

Mitchell Report lays out plan

PHOENIX -- Though the current roster went unmentioned, 14 active and former players with ties to the D-backs were named in a report released by former Sen. George Mitchell on Thursday.

Matt Williams, Troy Glaus, Jack Cust, Jason Grimsley, Chris Donnels, Stephen Randolph, Matt Herges, Jim Parque, Alex Cabrera, Jose Guillen, Darren Holmes, Bobby Estalella and Ron Villone were mentioned in the report. Former big league infielder Mike Bell, who managed the D-backs' short-season Yakima team in 2007, was also listed in the report.

"For the Diamondbacks and all of us in baseball, this is a difficult day. For those of us who love the game, it's a necessary day and hopefully it's the start of a new era in the game," Arizona managing general partner Ken Kendrick said.

The most noteworthy of the names in the Mitchell Report is Williams, who starred as a third baseman with the D-backs from 1998-2003. Williams is a television and radio analyst for the D-backs as well as a special assistant to CEO Jeff Moorad.

The San Francisco Chronicle on Nov. 6, 2007, reported that Williams had purchased steroids, syringes, human growth hormone and other drugs from the Palm Beach Rejuvenation Center in 2002. Williams was released by the D-backs during the 2003 season.

According to the Chronicle, and detailed in the report, Williams ordered $5,693 of testosterone cypionate, human growth hormone, clomiphene, Novarel and syringes, and on May 8, 2002, he ordered $6,000 worth of testosterone cypionate, nandrolone, clomiphene, Novarel and syringes. The prescriptions were written by a dentist, who also prescribed human growth hormone for Major Leaguers Paul Byrd and Guillen.

At the time that those stories were published, Williams explained his side of the story to Kendrick and the D-backs organization decided to stick behind their former All-Star. As of now, that has not changed, though Kendrick said it could depending on what Commissioner Bud Selig decides or what new information becomes available.

"Our position on Matt is that Bud is reserving the right, as he should, to look at each and every player that is mentioned and make an individual evaluation," Kendrick said. "And we're certainly going to be guided by whatever the Commissioner concludes is the appropriate action that needs to be taken, if any. As I said before, I believe that Matt was forthright and truthful when he talked to me. And if the facts now are proven to be different, then we will review our position. Independent of that, we'll obviously follow any directions that the commissioner gives us."

Bell, who had informed the club's management when he sat down with Mitchell's commission, is in a similar situation.

"As I said before, it's really, at this point, the Commissioner's prerogative to review his situation as he is going to review every single person, and we'll be guided by what leadership he gives us, what comments he gives us or directions that he gives us," Kendrick said. "We shouldn't be presumptuous and take any action until we've heard from MLB."

Overall, the D-backs emerged relatively unscathed from the report with no players on the roster being mentioned.

"Well, of course you'd prefer not any of your players be mentioned," Kendrick said. "But it's sad that any players were caught in this. We're certainly thankful that we, as a club, and our players played a very limited role."

The findings of the Mitchell Report, concerning the use of performance-enhancing drugs in Major League Baseball, were released at noon MST on Thursday.

Several high-profile, superstar-caliber players were among those named in the Mitchell Report, the product of a 21-month, multimillion dollar investigation that could shape decisions, prompt punitive actions against active players, and usher in the next era of the sport.

Free agent Roger Clemens, Andy Pettitte of the New York Yankees, Miguel Tejada of the Houston Astros, Eric Gagne of the Milwaukee Brewers and Paul Lo Duca of the Washington Nationals were among the most prominent former and current All-Stars to be mentioned in the lengthy report, which spans 311 pages, plus multiple exhibits, including evidence of signed checks, handwritten notes and shipping receipts.

Several high-profile, superstar-caliber players were among those named in the Mitchell Report, the product of a 21-month, multimillion dollar investigation that could shape decisions, prompt punitive actions against active players, and usher in the next era of the sport.

Free agent Roger Clemens and Andy Pettitte of the New York Yankees, Paul LoDuca of the Washington Nationals, Gagne and Tejada were among the most prominent former and current All-Stars to be mentioned in the lengthy report, which spans 311 pages of text, plus multiple exhibits, including photocopied evidence of signed checks, handwritten notes and shipping receipts.

The entire report is available for viewing here in a searchable, clickable version.

While the report detailed drug use in baseball by naming those accused, the report also contained 19 separate recommendations for the sport to move forward from this point, proceeding after a culture of steroids and performance enhancement grew exponentially in the late 1990s.

Mitchell's report named both Major League Baseball and the MLB Players Association in assigning blame, charging leadership -- from the Commissioner to club owners and general managers -- for allowing the issue to proliferate.

Steve Gilbert is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.