Pederson lands on 7-day concussion DL

Pederson lands on 7-day concussion DL

LOS ANGELES -- One day after Dodgers manager Dave Roberts said he didn't think center fielder Joc Pederson's neck injury was a disabled-list situation, Pederson landed on the seven-day concussion DL.

The Dodgers ran a few more tests on Pederson Thursday morning, and Roberts said there was some "fogginess," which led the club to rethink its decision.

Kenta Maeda, who got the start in Thursday's finale against the Cardinals, was activated off the DL and took Pederson's spot on the active roster.

Pederson said it's the first time in his career that he's suffered a concussion, and he's been advised to stay away from bright lights. That means no phones, television or video games.

"Yeah, it makes you feel really weird," Pederson said. "You don't really feel yourself. It's a little different. I'm not supposed to stimulate my brain."

Dodgers make another roster move

The Dodgers placed reliever Luis Avilan on the 10-day DL with left triceps soreness and reinstated reliever Adam Liberatore.

Avilan pitched one inning, allowing one hit in a relief appearance against the Cardinals on Wednesday. The southpaw has appeared in 23 games for the Dodgers this season and owns a 3.00 ERA.

The Dodgers had sent Liberatore to Triple-A Oklahoma for a rehab assignment on May 24.

Turner injures right leg

Turner's hamstring progressing

Justin Turner's hamstring is feeling much better than he expected, he said on Thursday.

For the first time since going on the DL on May 19 for a strained hamstring injury, the Dodgers third baseman went through minor pregame warmup routines. He took a few ground balls and played catch at third base a few hours before the Dodgers' series finale against the Cardinals.

Turner said his next step is to get back in the batter's box.

"As long as all that goes good," Turner said, "I'll probably pick up a bat for the first time, take some swings in the cage."

Joshua Thornton is a reporter for MLB.com based in Los Angeles. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.