Rizzo's power helps Hendricks beat Giants

Rizzo's power helps Hendricks beat Giants

CHICAGO -- It's been home runs or nothing lately for Anthony Rizzo, who notched his 14th career multi-homer game with two solo shots, doing so against lefty Matt Moore, to power the Cubs to a 5-4 victory over the Giants on Wednesday night.

The Giants tried to rally in the ninth against Wade Davis, who has been virtually untouchable. Mac Williamson battled Davis in a 12-pitch at-bat and then launched a two-run home run, the first off the right-hander since Sept. 24, 2015, to end a 64 1/3 homerless inning streak. Davis struck out Joe Panik to end the game and now is 10-for-10 in save opportunities.

Giants manager Bruce Bochy acknowledged Davis' dominance but also cited the right-hander's 3-2 pitch to Panik for a called strike that ended the game. After watching a replay, Bochy insisted it wasn't a strike.

"It's a shame to end it on that call, it really is," Bochy said. "We had him on fumes and they got the benefit of a bad call. That's not a strike; I'm sorry. But they got the call, and that's it."

Davis notches the save

Rizzo got the big hits and now has five hits in his last four games, and four of them have been home runs. The two Wednesday were enough to give Kyle Hendricks the win as he went seven innings in his longest outing of the season. The Cubs have won six of their last eight games and hit 17 home runs in that span.

"He's getting hot now," Hendricks said of Rizzo. "He really runs this lineup. When he starts getting hot, everybody around him starts to, too."

• Cast your Esurance All-Star ballot for Rizzo and other #ASGWorthy players

Moore scattered seven hits over six-plus innings and the Giants continued to be haunted by Wrigley Field. This was their 11th loss in the last 13 games at the so-called Friendly Confines, which includes last year's National League Division Series. San Francisco has lost consecutive games for the first time since dropping five in a row, May 5-9.

The Giants were happy to have their leadoff man, Denard Span, back. In the third, he hit a tiebreaking solo home run -- which is nothing new for the Giants. That was their 19th straight solo homer, two shy of the Major League record of 21, which they set in 2011; the streak ended with Williamson's homer in the nnth. Span had missed the last two games because of a left thumb sprain.

Span goes deep, says hi to mom

The Cubs tweaked their lineup and inserted Javier Baez in the leadoff spot for the first time this season, and he delivered a tiebreaking sacrifice fly in the fifth and accounted for another run in the seventh. The Cubs had runners at first and second in the seventh when Baez bunted against George Kontos, whose errant throw to third allowed a run to score.

"We gave them a cheap run there," Bochy said.

Montero scores on error

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
Running in place: The Cubs missed an opportunity to score in the sixth. Kris Bryant drew a walk after a 10-pitch at-bat against Moore to open the inning, and Rizzo then beat the shift with a single to left. One out later, Jason Heyward hit a comebacker to Moore, who threw to first, although first baseman Brandon Belt couldn't handle the throw. However, Heyward was called out because he ran inside the line and interfered with the throw, and the runners did not advance. Moore then struck out Addison Russell to end the inning.

"For me, I was running down the line, and I couldn't tell which way [Belt] was going to go," Heyward said. "I was trying to avoid him more than anything. It looked like he was going to come this way and cross in front of me, and then it looked like he was going to stay. Then I saw him reach with his glove, and I didn't know what else to do. I wasn't trying to collide with him."

Giants benefit from interference

Cubs manager Joe Maddon argued with home-plate umpire Jeff Nelson that Heyward had no other choice.

"There's no other way [for Heyward to run]," Maddon said. "Furthermore, the throw was on the other side of the bag. [Heyward] didn't interfere with anything. The throw was behind him toward the first-base coaching box."

Kaboom: Rizzo kept the Cubs in the game. He led off the second with his 10th homer, driving an 0-1 pitch from Moore off the small electronic scoreboard above the basket in right field. No lightbulbs were broken. The homer had an exit velocity of 103 mph and traveled 382 feet. With two outs in the fourth, Rizzo connected again, this time with two outs in the fourth, to notch his 14th career multi-homer game and first this year. The second shot had an exit velocity of 108 mph and traveled 434 feet.

"He's one of the best at what he does," Heyward said. "I tell him that all the time. ... He knows it and he's one of the best at preparing day in and day out, and that's what makes him special."

Rizzo's two-homer game

QUOTABLE
"When you get a lead like we did tonight, you want to win those games. We've got a good home-field advantage, one of the better ones in sports as far as the fan support. We don't take that for granted." -- Heyward

WHAT'S NEXT
Giants: Jeff Samardzija, who'll start Thursday's series finale for San Francisco, would prefer to avoid the fate he endured in his previous appearance against the Cubs. He allowed them four runs and six hits in two innings during Game 2 of last October's Division Series. First pitch is scheduled for 11:20 a.m. PT.

Cubs: Eddie Butler will close the Cubs' series against the Giants on Thursday. The right-hander was roughed up in his last outing, lasting just three innings against the Brewers. He is 3-0 with a 3.22 ERA in four career starts against the Giants. First pitch is scheduled for 1:20 p.m. CT at Wrigley Field.

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Chris Haft has covered the Giants since 2005, and for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter at @sfgiantsbeat and listen to his podcast.

Carrie Muskat has covered the Cubs since 1987, and for MLB.com since 2001. She writes a blog, Muskat Ramblings. You can follow her on Twitter @CarrieMuskat and listen to her podcast.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.