Machado places fifth for AL MVP; Britton is 11th

Machado places fifth for AL MVP; Britton is 11th

BALTIMORE -- Orioles third baseman Manny Machado finished fifth in American League Most Valuable Player Award voting, which was revealed on MLB Network on Thursday night by the Baseball Writers' Association of America (BBWAA).

The award, which went to Angels center fielder Mike Trout, also saw Orioles closer Zach Britton finish 11th. It marked the highest ranking in AL MVP voting this season for a pitcher.

Complete 2016 Awards coverage

Machado had 150 points, including five fourth-place votes, seven fifth-place votes and nine sixth-place votes. He was named on every ballot, which ranks players 1-10 and works off a tabulated system that awards 14 points for first place, nine for second, eight for third and so on.

Following Trout were Boston's Mookie Betts, Houston's Jose Altuve and Toronto's Josh Donaldson.

All-time American League MVP Award winners

Britton, who finished fourth in AL Cy Young Award voting, had 11 points, one at eighth place, three at ninth and two at 10th.

Britton on growing in 2016

Machado hit 37 homers and had 96 RBIs, batting .294 last season, while Britton went a perfect 47-for-47 in save opportunities with a 0.54 ERA.

The MLB Awards -- following league-specific recognition by BBWAA voters, whose ballots are based on regular-season play -- include candidates from both leagues (with postseason performance taken into consideration). MLB Awards are based on votes by retired players, broadcasters/reporters, team executives, Society of American Baseball Research members and fans, with each group accounting for 20 percent of the process. Esurance MLB Awards week concludes Friday on MLB Network and MLB.com at 8 p.m. ET. MLB Awards categories include Best Major Leaguer, Hitter, Pitcher, Rookie, Executive and Manager.

Brittany Ghiroli has covered the Orioles for MLB.com since 2010. Read her blog, Britt's Bird Watch, follow her on Facebook and Twitter @britt_ghiroli, and listen to her podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.