Broxton arrested for misdemeanor trespassing

MILWAUKEE -- The Brewers on Friday acknowledged the early morning arrest in Tampa of center fielder Keon Broxton on a misdemeanor trespassing charge for allegedly refusing to leave the area of a fight.

"We are aware of the news regarding Keon Broxton and are currently gathering information," GM David Stearns said in a statement. "We will defer further comment until we know more about the situation."

Acquired last Dec. 17 in a trade with the Pirates, Broxton played in 75 games during four stints with the Brewers in 2016. He made a mechanical adjustment with the position of his hands to surge in the fourth of those stints and become the Brewers' everyday center fielder, finishing with a .242/.354/.430 slash line and 20 extra-base hits, including nine home runs.

His season ended abruptly on Sept. 16, when Broxton fractured his right wrist in a collision with the ivy-covered brick wall at Wrigley Field while making a catch.

The Tampa Bay Times reported Broxton was arrested at 3:26 a.m. ET after officers were called to reports of a fight in an area of bars, restaurants and other businesses on Howard Avenue and Platt Street. Citing the police report, the Times reported that Broxton was intoxicated and became upset when officers ordered the crowd to disperse from the area. He was arrested several blocks away after allegedly stepping onto the property of a closed business after being warned he would be arrested for doing so.

Broxton was charged with misdemeanor trespassing and later released from jail on bond.

"I sincerely apologize to my family, the Brewers organization, Milwaukee Brewers fans and also to law enforcement officials for my lack of proper judgment last night," Broxton said in a statement. "I will learn from this incident, and I will certainly make better decisions moving forward. I owe that to myself and all who have put their trust and faith in me as a person. Thank you for your support and understanding."

Adam McCalvy has been a reporter for MLB.com since 2001. Follow him on Twitter @AdamMcCalvy, like him on Facebook and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.