Robertson has successful left knee surgery

Closer due to open Spring Training at full strength after meniscus procedure

Robertson has successful left knee surgery

CHICAGO -- David Robertson had arthroscopic surgery on his left knee last week. The procedure was a simple cleanup of a meniscus issue that the White Sox closer had pitched with for a while, and the club said he will be without restrictions upon reporting for Spring Training in February.

Robertson, 31, has posted 71 saves over his two seasons as White Sox closer and has 110 saves over the past three seasons. The right-hander's 37 saves in 2016 ranked him tied for fourth in the American League in that particular category, although his seven blown saves also left him tied for second in the AL. Robertson fanned 75 and allowed 53 hits in 62 1/3 innings. His 28 unintentional walks represent his highest total since walking 29 unintentionally in 2011, when Robertson finished with a miniscule 1.08 ERA over 66 2/3 innings and 70 appearances as an All-Star for the Yankees.

If the White Sox move in a rebuilding direction during this upcoming offseason, Robertson becomes one of the numerous veteran trade candidates. Robertson remains a solid late-inning force, as well as a respected clubhouse presence. He has two years at $25 million remaining on a four-year, $46 million deal Robertson agreed to with the White Sox prior to the 2015 season.

But if the team decides to build around its youthful core, Robertson becomes an important component for postseason contention. When healthy, the White Sox have a solid bullpen with Nate Jones, Zach Putnam, Jake Petricka and Dan Jennings joining Robertson, not to mention hard-throwing 21-year-old right-hander Zack Burdi, who was the team's 26th selection overall in the 2016 Draft and has a chance to break camp with the '17 squad.

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Read his blog, Merk's Works, follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin, on Facebook and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.