DYK: Facts and figures from NLCS Game 5

DYK: Facts and figures from NLCS Game 5

Following back-to-back shutout losses, the Cubs rolled to their second straight win, 8-4, on Thursday night in Game 5 of the National League Championship Series at Dodger Stadium.

Chicago's victory gave the club a 3-2 lead in the best-of-seven series, with Game 6 set for Saturday at Wrigley Field.

NLCS Game 6: Saturday at 8 p.m. ET on FS1

Here are some facts and figures to know from the Cubs' win, which put them one win away from their first World Series berth since 1945.

Game Date Matchup Highlights
Gm 1 Oct. 15 CHC 8, LAD 4 video
Gm 2 Oct. 16 LAD 1, CHC 0 video
Gm 3 Oct. 18 LAD 6, CHC 0 video
Gm 4 Oct. 19 CHC 10, LAD 2 video
Gm 5 Oct. 20 CHC 8, LAD 4 video
Gm 6 Oct. 22 CHC 5, LAD 0 video

• Historically, the Cubs are in a good position. In all best-of-seven postseason series that have been tied 2-2, teams that win Game 5 on the road are 19-4 in the series. In the LCS alone, teams that win a tiebreaking Game 5 on the road have gone on to win the series five of six times.

• The Dodgers now have their work cut out for them, needing to win Games 6 and 7 at Wrigley Field to advance to the World Series. Teams that have trailed the LCS three games to two are just 10-27 in the series, and 6-14 in the NLCS.

• When the Cubs took the lead in the first inning of Game 5, it put them in great position. Including the postseason, Chicago entered the night 39-7 when leading after the opening frame in 2016.

• The Cubs scored seven of their eight runs after the fifth, including five in the eighth. This postseason they have scored 56 percent of their runs after the fifth and 40 percent in the eighth and ninth.

• Cubs starter Jon Lester tossed seven innings of one-run ball for the win, improving to 3-0 when pitching Game 5 of a postseason series. All three wins have come on the road -- the first two were with the Red Sox in the 2013 American League Championship Series and World Series -- and Lester has a 1.80 ERA in those games.

Lester pitches through the 7th

• Lester recorded his 100th career postseason strikeout during Game 5, making him one of just six left-handers to reach the century mark in postseason play. Lester joined a group that also includes the Dodgers' Clayton Kershaw, as well as Andy Pettitte, Tom Glavine, Randy Johnson and CC Sabathia.

• Lester completed seven innings in a postseason start for the 10th time in his career, the most among active pitchers, breaking a tie with Madison Bumgarner.

• This was Lester's fourth time facing the Dodgers this year, including two starts in the NLCS. He's held them to three runs through 28 innings, fanning 25 against four walks.

• When the Dodgers' Enrique Hernandez walked on four pitches to begin the bottom of the first inning, it was the first time Lester had opened a start with a four-pitch free pass since Aug. 30, 2012, against the Angels' Mike Trout.

• Dodgers third baseman Justin Turner singled in the third and has reached base safely in each of his 15 postseason games from 2015-16. That is the longest streak in Dodgers history, passing Carl Furillo's 14-gamer from 1953-56.

Turner extends postseason streak

Howie Kendrick stole third base for the Dodgers in the fourth, then scored the tying run on Adrian Gonzalez's RBI groundout. The Dodgers had stolen third base five times during the regular season, with Kendrick recording one of those. In his career, Kendrick is 14-of-17 stealing third base, including the postseason.

Kendrick steals third

• In Game 5, Kenta Maeda made the Dodgers' seventh start this postseason by a pitcher other than Clayton Kershaw. With Maeda going only 3 2/3 innings, four of those seven outings have not gotten through four frames, and all but one has not finished five.

Maeda exits the game

Kris Bryant's double in the fourth made him the first Cubs player to collect 10 postseason extra-base hits. Bryant has six doubles, a triple and three homers over the past two postseasons.

• When the Cubs' Addison Russell smacked the tiebreaking two-run homer in the sixth, his second long ball of the series, he joined Carlos Correa, Francisco Lindor and the Dodgers' Corey Seager as the only shortstops to have multiple postseason homers before turning 23. Correa accomplished the feat with a two-homer game last postseason, while the other three have gone deep in multiple games this postseason.

• Russell also became only the fourth player 22 or younger to homer in consecutive postseason games, joining Jimmie Foxx (1929), Andruw Jones (1996) and Miguel Cabrera (2003).

• Dodgers reliever Joe Blanton, who surrendered Miguel Montero's tiebreaking grand slam late in Game 1, was also on the wrong end of Russell's tiebreaking homer Thursday. Since the LCS expanded to seven games in 1985, the only other reliever to allow multiple tiebreaking home runs in one series was the Astros' Dan Miceli in 2004 against the Cardinals.

• The Cubs improved to 48-13 this year when Dexter Fowler reached base to lead off a game. Fowler opened Game 5 with a single to center field.

Fowler's RBI infield single

• Russell batted just 1-for-24 with four strikeouts in his first seven playoff games this year, but appears to have turned a corner. He hit 5-for-9 with two home runs and four RBIs in the past two games at Dodger Stadium.

• The Cubs had 18 at-bats with runners in scoring position, the second-highest total in franchise history. The club record is 19, set during Game 1 of the 1908 World Series when Chicago won its last title. The Cubs hit 10-for-31 with runners in scoring position in Games 4 and 5 after going just 2-for-16 through the first three games of this series.

• Gonzalez collected the 21st postseason RBI of his career Thursday, tying Dusty Baker for fourth-most in franchise history. Only Davey Lopes (22), Steve Garvey (22) and Ron Cey (24) have driven in more runs in the playoffs for the Dodgers.

Gonzalez's RBI groundout

David Adler is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @_dadler.

Andrew Simon is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @AndrewSimonMLB.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.