DYK? Key facts from Nats-Dodgers Game 5

DYK? Key facts from Nats-Dodgers Game 5

In a dramatic Game 5 that lived up to the winner-take-all stakes, the Dodgers pulled off a 4-3 win over the Nationals on Thursday night in Washington, claiming victory in the National League Division Series.

Los Angeles, which hung on after taking the lead in a four-run seventh inning, now advances to face the Cubs in the NL Championship Series, beginning Saturday night at Wrigley Field (8 p.m. ET, FS1).

Game Date Matchup Highlights
Gm 1 Oct. 7 LAD 4, WAS 3 video
Gm 2 Oct. 9 WSH 5, LAD 2 video
Gm 3 Oct. 10 WAS 8, LAD 3 video
Gm 4 Oct. 11 LAD 6, WAS 5 video
Gm 5 Oct. 13 LAD 4, WSH 3 video

Here are some facts and figures to know from this year's only Division Series Game 5:

• With their dramatic win, the Dodgers advanced to the NLCS for the fourth time since 2008. Since moving to Los Angeles in 1958, they are 4-1 in winner-take-all postseason games. Their previous win in such a game was in Game 7 of the 1988 NLCS against the Mets.

• With the Championship Series matchups now set, it's assured that this year's World Series winner will bring an end to a notable title drought. None of the four remaining teams -- the Blue Jays, Indians, Dodgers and Cubs -- have won in the last 22 years. Toronto is the most recent World Series victor (1993), followed by the Dodgers (1988), Indians (1948) and Cubs (1908).

• The Nationals still have yet to win their first postseason series since moving to Washington, D.C., in 2005. They've dropped all three of their postseason series since the move. As the Expos, the franchise won one postseason series in 1981, beating the Phillies in the NLDS of a strike-shortened season.

• This was the Nationals' second winner-take-all postseason game, after Game 5 of the 2012 NLDS against the Cardinals. In that game, Washington led 6-0 after three innings and 7-5 entering the ninth before losing 9-7. The Cardinals' comeback from a six-run deficit was the largest in a winner-take-all postseason game.

• Dusty Baker's teams have now lost each of the past nine potential series-clinching games he's managed, going back to the 2003 Cubs in the NLCS. That's the longest streak by any manager in MLB history.

• Since the Division Series was permanently adopted in 1995 -- the beginning of the Wild Card Era -- the home team is just 11-16 in winner-take-all Game 5s.

• At 4 hours and 32 minutes, this was the longest postseason game in history that didn't go into extra innings. The previous record of 4 hours and 20 minutes was set by the Yankees and Red Sox in Game 3 of the 2004 American League Championship Series.

• Dodgers ace Clayton Kershaw, who started Game 4 on short rest, got the final two outs for his first Major League save, after relieving Kenley Jansen. Kershaw's only other professional save came on Aug. 19, 2006, for the Rookie-level Gulf Coast League Dodgers -- against the GCL Nationals. His catcher in that game was Jansen, who had not yet converted to pitching.

Kershaw earns first career save

Kershaw had never previously entered an MLB game in the middle of an inning and hadn't pitched in relief since Oct. 21, 2009, in Game 5 of the NLCS against the Phillies. In that game, he tossed two innings, allowing two earned runs, and faced current teammates Carlos Ruiz and Chase Utley, plus current Nationals outfielder Jayson Werth.

• Kershaw became the seventh pitcher since 1970 to earn a postseason save on one day of rest, following a start. The last was the White Sox Mark Buehrle, who got the final out in Game 3 of the 2005 World Series, two days after pitching seven innings.

• The Dodgers brought Jansen into the game with no outs in the seventh inning, clinging to a 4-3 lead, the first time the big right-hander entered a game before the eighth inning since May 25, 2013, against the Cardinals. Jansen ultimately threw 51 pitches over 2 1/3 innings, nine more pitches than he had ever thrown in a big league game.

Jansen's solid relief outing

• Jansen also got his second plate appearance of the NLDS, becoming the first Dodgers reliever to have multiple games with a plate appearance in a postseason series since Steve Howe in the 1981 World Series. Jansen had four career plate appearances entering the postseason, and none since 2014.

• When Julio Urias entered the game for the Dodgers in the fifth inning, at 20 years, 62 days old, he became the youngest Dodgers pitcher to appear in postseason game, passing Don Drysdale in the 1956 World Series (20 years, 76 days). He's also the youngest pitcher to appear in any playoff game since 1970 (the Reds' Don Gullett and the Twins' Bert Blyleven were both 19), as well as the youngest pitcher in a Game 5 of a Division Series.

• Urias, who led the Major Leagues with six pickoffs during the regular season despite only pitching in 18 games, nailed Bryce Harper at first base in the fifth inning. It was the first pickoff in a winner-take-all postseason game since 2001, when the Indians' Chuck Finley had one against the Mariners, and the A's Mark Mulder had one against the Yankees, in Game 5 of their respective ALDS.

Urias picks Harper off first

• When the Dodgers' Joc Pederson hit a game-tying solo home run in the top of the seventh inning, it was only the second homer to left field all season for the left-handed batter. Pederson also became the first Dodgers player to homer in a winner-take-all postseason game since Rick Monday hit a go-ahead solo shot against the Montreal Expos in Game 5 of the 1981 NLCS.

• With a walk and a two-run triple, the Dodgers' Justin Turner now has reached base safely in each of his 10 career postseason starts, all in the NLDS for the Dodgers over the past two years. He is the seventh player in history to reach base at least twice in at least 10 straight postseason games, the first since Manny Ramirez (13 games from 2005-07).

Turner grinds out a walk

• Turner now has a career postseason batting average of .444 (16-for-36 in 44 plate appearances across three playoff series). That is the highest career postseason batting average for any Major Leaguer with as many plate appearances as Turner.

• With his second-inning single, the Nationals' Daniel Murphy now has reached base safely in each of his first 19 career postseason games, passing Hank Greenberg (1934-45) for second on the all-time list. Only Boog Powell (25 games, 1966-71) put together a longer streak to begin his career.

• Murphy picked up a pair of stolen bases in the first three innings of the game. In his career, he had stolen multiple bases in a game only once before: June 22, 2013, for the Mets.

Murphy slyly swipes second base

Chris Heisey's pinch-hit two-run homer for the Nationals in the seventh inning, which brought Washington within a run of the Dodgers, was the first postseason pinch-hit home run in Nationals/Expos franchise history. Heisey, a former Dodger, hit three pinch-hit homers during the regular season. There had only been two prior pinch-hit homers in winner-take-all postseason games -- the Cubs' Troy O'Leary in Game 7 of the 2003 NLCS against the Marlins and the Yankees' David Justice in Game 5 of the 2001 ALDS against the A's.

Heisey's two-run homer to left

• The Nationals' Anthony Rendon set a Division Series record for runners left on base, according to STATS LLC, when he struck out with the bases loaded to end the seventh inning. Rendon stranded 22 runners in the series.

• Nationals starter Max Scherzer, who threw six scoreless innings before allowing Pederson's game-tying homer, has seen his team lose all four times he has started an elimination game. Overall in the postseason, Scherzer's teams have lost the last five times he's started, including twice in this series.

Andrew Simon is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @AndrewSimonMLB.

David Adler is a reporter for MLB.com based in New York. Follow him on Twitter at @_dadler.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.