Rookies Bradley, Anderson step into spotlight at Coors

Rookies Bradley, Anderson step into spotlight at Coors

Rookie pitchers Tyler Anderson and Archie Bradley, both first-round Draft picks in 2011, will face off on Friday night at Coors Field after finding success earlier in the season in hitter-friendly Minor League parks.

Colorado's Anderson, who produced a 2.35 ERA across three Minor League levels, has been excellent, holding opponents to three earned runs over 12 innings. Despite his youth, manager Walt Weiss hasn't limited Anderson's workload, and has been impressed by how well he's held his command and velocity through two starts.

"It's not a hard number or anything like that," Weiss said. "We do keep in mind that he's been away for a while. He's had a pretty unique [right oblique] injury. We don't lose sight of these things. Again, in a situation like that, you've got to trust your eyes, trust your gut, but we don't lose sight of what he's been through."

Bradley, who recorded a 1.99 ERA in seven starts at Triple-A Reno, has been solid since joining the D-backs' rotation after two spot starts. He has a 3.69 ERA over his last five starts, including a stellar outing his last time through the rotation, allowing no earned runs on three hits through six innings.

Three things you should know about this game

• Bradley made a spot start on May 9 in Colorado, allowing four runs on seven hits over six innings. Rockies shortstop Trevor Story hit a pair of RBI doubles off him.

• Prior to allowing a run against the Yankees on June 22, Rockies reliever Boone Logan had not allowed an earned run in his previous 15 2/3 innings, a string of 23 appearances dating back to April 14. That was the longest current scoreless streak in Major League Baseball.

• D-backs catcher Chris Herrmann, who is hitting .318 in his last eight games, will likely start on Friday as manager Chip Hale tries to give Welington Castillo a couple of days off during this series.

Ben Weinrib is a reporter for MLB.com based in Denver. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.