White Sox score in all 8 frames, rout Indians

White Sox score in all 8 frames, rout Indians

CHICAGO -- The White Sox scored in all eight innings they hit, taking advantage of porous Indians defense, and cruised to an 11-4 victory over the American League Central leaders on Monday night at U.S. Cellular Field. Todd Frazier completed the scoring with a two-run, two-out blast in the eighth, his career-high 36th homer.

This contest marked the second time in team history since 1912, where the White Sox scored in every inning where they had an at-bat per STATS LLC. The last one was May 11, 1949, during a 12-8 victory over the Red Sox, when Luke Appling had two hits for the White Sox and Ted Williams homered for Boston. The White Sox scored two runs apiece in the fourth, seventh and eighth, and one run in each of the first, second, third, fifth and sixth. The run in the sixth scored on a passed ball by catcher Roberto Perez on Omar Narvaez's swinging third strike with two out.

"We swung the bats tonight. All the way through the lineup everybody seemed to be clicking," manager Robin Ventura said of his team's 16-hit attack. "When you're knocking in runs with two outs, it's always going to be a big key. All the way through, it was a nice night. They didn't let up."

Cleveland's lead in the AL Central dropped to six games with Detroit's win over Minnesota, while the White Sox elimination number in the division held at six.

Before the Brewers, who scored in all eight innings in an 11-3 win over the Braves on Aug. 11, the Tigers were the last team to score in every inning at-bat, during a home Interleague win over the Rockies in August 2014.

Tim Anderson propelled the White Sox from the top of the order with three hits, giving him 28 multi-hit efforts this season. Anderson added an RBI and a stolen base off Indians starter Carlos Carrasco, who clearly labored from the outset. Jose Abreu added two hits and two RBIs, while Avisail Garcia and Adam Eaton also went deep. Garcia gave the White Sox more than balance by matching a career high with four hits.

Eaton's solo shot

Carrasco allowed five runs (four earned) on eight hits over 3 2/3 innings. He fell to 1-5 with a 6.55 ERA in eight starts against the White Sox since the start of the 2015 season as the first of seven pitchers used by manager Terry Francona. Miguel Gonzalez held the Indians in check over 6 2/3 innings, yielding six hits, with four coming during Cleveland's three-run second. He struck out four and walked two.

"Carlos' stuff was too good for that, and it's not just on Carlos," Francona said. "We didn't make plays, we made errors, we had crossups. That's as about as bad a game as we've played in a while. Hopefully, we get it out of our system tonight and play like we can."

MOMENTS THAT MATTERED
That has to hurt: Abreu looked momentarily dazed in the third as he stepped across first base to grab Anderson's throw on Jason Kipnis' grounder. Replays showed that Kipnis accidentally socked Abreu in the face with his left hand as he tried to avoid the tag. Kipnis checked on Abreu immediately, along with Ventura and head athletic trainer Herm Schneider. But Abreu stayed in the game.

Abreu gets checked on

"He'll probably feel it tomorrow," Ventura said.

Well-balanced attack: Garcia, Narvaez and Tyler Saladino combined for seven hits, five runs scored and three RBIs from the bottom third of the White Sox order. Garcia is 14-for-33 over his last eight games, while Saladino is 11-for-18 over his last five.

Garcia's four-hit game

"It was pretty impressive to watch and be out there, and be supportive for my team," Gonzalez said. "They really picked me up back there."

Two-base error: Carrasco wasn't sharp throughout his short outing, but his defense didn't help in the second after the Indians took a 3-1 lead in the top half of the inning. With one out, Garcia singled and right fielder Lonnie Chisenhall let the ball scoot by him as Garcia chugged to third base. He scored on a sacrifice fly by Narvaez. Chisenhall made another error in the fifth that led to another unearned run. More >

Garcia advances to third

"He got caught in-between. He got in no-man's land," Francona said of Chisenhall on the first error. "On the second one, I think he was looking to see where the runner was and didn't look it into his glove."

QUOTABLE
"You're going to win a few ballgames if you score in every inning." -- Eaton

"It was a tough way to start a series. Offense and defense both weren't there at the same time. Luckily it's a four-game series and we can still win it." -- Chisenhall, on the Indians play

SOUND SMART WITH YOUR FREINDS
Gonzalez picked up the 500th strikeout of his career by getting Francisco Lindor in the first.

AFTER FURTHER REVIEW
Abreu was ruled to have been doubled off on Justin Morneau's line drive to shortstop Lindor in the fifth, which would have left the White Sox with two out and none on. But Ventura used his challenge, and video replay overturned the call, leaving Abreu at first. The White Sox went on to score one run in the frame.

White Sox review play in 5th

The Indians lost a challenge to end the top of the second. Carlos Santana grounded into a 6-5-3 double play -- with the shift on the left-handed hitter -- but Francona contended Santana had beat the relay throw to first. After a review, the call was ruled to stand.

Indians review double play

WHAT'S NEXT
Indians: Right-hander Trevor Bauer (11-6, 3.86 ERA) will start the second game of the series on Tuesday at 8:10 p.m. ET. Bauer is 3-1 with a 3.21 ERA in his eight previous starts against Chicago.

White Sox: Left-hander Jose Quintana (11-10, 3.13) makes his fourth start of the season against the Indians on Tuesday at 7:10 p.m. CT. He is 5-3 with a 2.70 ERA over 15 career starts vs. Cleveland.

Watch every out-of-market regular-season game live on MLB.TV.

Scott Merkin has covered the White Sox for MLB.com since 2003. Read his blog, Merk's Works, follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin, on Facebook and listen to his podcast.

John Jackson is a contributor to MLB.com based in Chicago and covered the Indians on Monday.

This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.