Chapman's homer party sweet noise for Sounds

Athletics' No. 4 prospect goes 4-for-5 with 3 homers for Triple-A Nashville

Chapman's homer party sweet noise for Sounds

When Matt Chapman hits home runs, they usually come in bunches.

That certainly was the case on Saturday night, when the A's No. 4 prospect, who had already homered in back-to-back games earlier in the week, went deep in his first three at-bats for Triple-A Nashville. He finished 4-for-5 with four RBIs, though it wasn't enough to keep the Sounds from losing to New Orleans, 6-5.

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Chapman gave the Sounds an early lead when he connected on a two-run home run to center field in the top of the first inning, plating shortstop Franklin Barreto (A's No. 1). In the third inning, the 23-year-old third baseman led off the frame with a homer, going deep to left field on the eighth pitch of his at-bat, and he connected on another shot to open the fifth. All three of Chapman's home runs came against New Orleans starter Asher Wojciechowski.

Chapman's three-homer performance was the first of his career and seventh in Sounds history. The last player to accomplish the feat was Russell Branyan, who did so on May 16, 2008.

Box score

Chapman had two more opportunities to become the first player in franchise history to hit four home runs in a game but came up short in both at-bats, notching a single in the seventh inning and then striking out looking in the eighth.

The three home runs give Chapman 36 on the season, good for third place in the Minor Leagues behind Double-A Reading's Dylan Cozens (39) and Rhys Hoskins (37). Seven of those home runs have come during his 17 games since being promoted to Nashville, though he's batting just .194 in that span.

All together, Chapman has posted a .237 average with 68 extra-base hits and 96 RBIs this season in 134 games between the Double- and Triple-A levels.

Mike Rosenbaum is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @GoldenSombrero. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.