Pedroia's latest 5-hit effort comes amid surge

Pedroia's latest 5-hit effort comes amid surge

BOSTON -- Dustin Pedroia moved into the Red Sox's leadoff spot on Wednesday and hasn't looked back since.

The second baseman was a major catalyst in the Red Sox's dominant 16-2 win over the D-backs on Sunday at Fenway Park, collecting five hits for a franchise-record fifth time.

"This is one of the best organizations in baseball. I'm definitely proud of that," said Pedroia.

Pedroia sprayed the ball to every part of the field, getting singles in the first, second, third and fifth innings, before rocketing a double to left-center field in the eighth. It marked Pedroia's second five-hit game of the season, with the other coming on July 21 against the Twins.

"It was one of those games where I just found the barrel," Pedroia said. "That's it. I got pitches to hit and I didn't miss them."

Red Sox manager John Farrell decided to move Mookie Betts out of the leadoff spot and into the three-hole to take advantage of his recent power surge. Betts hit three homers on Sunday. Pedroia said he wasn't fazed by the switch since he'd hit there in college and early in his career.

In five games since the lineup change, Pedroia is hitting .500 (11-for-22), with four doubles and four RBIs.

"When we made this move, there was some thought that if Mookie's going to stay on the power run that he's on, maybe it's got a chance to be with some people on base," Farrell said. "Today's certainly an exception. But [Pedroia] hasn't changed his approach. He's getting a number of base hits the other way. He's taking what the pitcher is giving him. He's getting on base. He's not thinking about anything other than the at-bats, not as they're attached to the spot in the lineup."

Betts, who went 4-for-6 on Sunday with eight RBIs, is enjoying having Pedroia at the top of the lineup.

"You know, he gets on base so much," Betts said. "It's just fun being able to drive him in."

Quinn Roberts is a reporter for MLB.com based in Boston. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.