Dahl's career-opening 17-game hit streak ties record

Rockies outfielder matches MLB mark set by Reds' Aleno 75 years ago

Dahl's career-opening 17-game hit streak ties record

ARLINGTON -- Rockies rookie outfielder David Dahl admitted difficulty grasping 75 years.

It had been that long since a player has hit safely in his first 17 Major League games. Dahl's first-inning single in Thursday afternoon's 12-9 victory over the Rangers tied him with Chuck Aleno of the 1941 Reds for the MLB record.

"It's pretty cool," said Dahl, who should have a chance to break the mark Friday night at Philadelphia in the opener of a three-game series. "I really haven't thought much about it, besides looking on Twitter."

Statcast: Dahl extends streak

Dahl, 22, a first-round Rockies Draft pick in 2012, is a big part of the team's future as its No. 2 prospect, but there's no telling where his final place in baseball history will be. As for Aleno, he didn't reach Major League stardom, but lived a notable life.

Aleno hit .389 during his streak. After that, he played in 101 games through 1944 and hit .157 (39-for-249). But he did play for Minor League teams in Florida through 1953.

According to his online obituary, which was reprinted from the Feb. 13, 2003, DeLand Deltona Beacon newspaper by The Deadball Era website, Aleno stayed close to the game. He was the concessionaire for all DeLand, Fla., ballparks for more than 40 years and a charter member of the Rockland County (N.Y.) Professional Sports Hall of Fame.

Post-baseball, he owned Aleno Interiors, a business taken over by his son, Chuck, and was a member of the Jaycees and the Elks and Moose lodges.

The social media Dahl read to learn about Aleno wasn't a factor in 1941. Heck, night baseball was just 9 years old. Batting helmets were non-existent and space-age, lightweight bats, shoes and uniforms hadn't even entered folks' dreams.

"I don't know, it would have been a lot different than it is now," Dahl said. "It's kind of weird to think about."

Thomas Harding has covered the Rockies since 2000, and for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @harding_at_mlb, listen to podcasts and like his Facebook page. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.