Crawford sets Giants record with 7 hits

Crawford sets Giants record with 7 hits

MIAMI -- Brandon Crawford did something no player has done in 41 years Monday night. The Giants' shortstop recorded seven hits, tying a National League record for hits in a game, in San Francisco's 8-7, 14-inning win over the Marlins at Marlins Park.

To put the feat in perspective, only five players since 1913 have managed to reach the seven-hit mark. The last to do so was Pittsburgh's Rennie Stennett in a nine-inning game against the Cubs in 1975.

"It doesn't happen very often that you get eight at-bats in a game," Crawford said. "I figured [seven hits] probably didn't happen a whole lot. You don't think about stuff like that when you're playing."

Before Crawford and Stennett, the other three players to have at least seven hits since 1913 were Detroit's Cesar Gutierrez in 1970, Detroit's Rocky Colavito in 1962 and Cleveland's Johnny Burnett, who logged nine hits, in 1932.

The NL record Crawford tied included Stennett and Baltimore's Wilbert Robinson, who notched seven hits in 1892.

Even more, Crawford set a franchise record with his seven-hit performance. Considering the Giants have existed for 134 years and have numerous players enshrined in Cooperstown, he was amazed.

"It's crazy to me," Crawford said. "The history of the Giants with all the great players that have come through here you would think that someone would push across seven hits in one day. That's pretty crazy to be in that small company."

The franchise's previous record was six hits in a single game, done eight times in its history. The last to do so was Mike Benjamin in 1995, followed by Jesus Alou (1964), Frankie Frisch (1924), Dave Bancroft (1920), Kip Selbach (1901), George Davis (1895), Jack Glasscock (1890) and Danny Richardson (1887).

Crawford actually had more hits Monday than the six he had in his previous 36 at-bats. But to him, that's just a part of the game.

"I got a couple to drop in and squeak past and then I hit a few balls hard too that found holes," said Crawford, who was a homer shy of hitting for the cycle. "I felt good. That's just baseball. One day you feel like you can't square anything up and the next day you get a couple that squeak through and you barrel a couple up."

Patrick Pinak is a reporter for MLB.com based in Miami. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.