Yankees keep focus amid trade rumors

Chapman, Miller and Beltran among New York players drawing interest

Yankees keep focus amid trade rumors

NEW YORK -- It has been speculated that several Yankees may be wearing different uniforms in the next two weeks, but that uncertainty doesn't seem to have affected the vibe in the clubhouse, where the latest trade rumors have been regularly greeted with shrugs.

It most definitely did not appear to be a factor for Aroldis Chapman, who clocked 105.1 mph with his fastball in Monday's 2-1 victory over the Orioles, securing his 19th save in 20 chances. Should the Yanks decide to sell in advance of the Aug. 1 non-waiver Trade Deadline, Chapman is viewed as one of their most attractive pieces to move.

"That's something I don't worry about," Chapman said through an interpreter. "I try just to concentrate on doing my job on the game and helping the team win. It's really something I have no control over."

Chapman would make sense for several contenders in search of bullpen help and looking to bolster their chances of winning a World Series by adding a bona fide closer. The Cubs, Indians, Nationals and Rangers are among the teams that could be interested in Chapman, left-hander Andrew Miller or potentially both.

The Yankees would be seeking a return greater than the four-player package of Rookie Davis, Eric Jagielo, Tony Renda and Caleb Cotham that they sent to the Reds for Chapman, who came at a discount as he was facing suspension for violating MLB's domestic violence policy.

Chapman is a free agent after this season and, conceivably, the Yankees could look to re-sign him without having to surrender Draft pick compensation. Miller is signed through 2018 at $9 million per year.

Yahoo Sports reported this week that the Yankees have shown interest in Cubs slugger Kyle Schwarber, who is out for the season after sustaining a torn left ACL in an April outfield collision. The Yanks are also said to be heavily scouting the Indians' Minor League organization, including 20-year-old left-hander Justus Sheffield, the nephew of former Yankee Gary Sheffield.

The Yankees have also taken note of the high asking prices for starting pitching; the Padres made the Red Sox part with touted prospect Anderson Espinoza in last week's Drew Pomeranz trade, and the A's reportedly demanded Espinoza when Boston asked about left-hander Rich Hill.

As such, the Yankees would be willing to listen to offers on Nathan Eovaldi, Ivan Nova or Michael Pineda. MLB.com's Jon Morosi reported that the Marlins have shown interest in Pineda, but the Yanks have said that they are not ready to deal him at this time. Eovaldi's name has been connected to both the Pirates and Rangers.

Carlos Beltran, enjoying an All-Star campaign at age 39 that has already seen the switch-hitter match last year's home run total (19), also might draw interest from a contender such as the Indians or Royals. Beltran, who is in the final year of a three-year, $45 million deal, said that blocking out the questions has not been an issue.

"Not difficult at all," Beltran said. "I have a responsibility to the New York Yankees, so my job is to come here and get ready to play the game. What's going to happen is going to happen. I cannot worry about that. I've just got enough with the game itself."

Beltran's towering home run

At 46-46 entering Tuesday, Yankees brass has not decided if they see themselves as buyers or sellers, the latter role being something that they have never done under Brian Cashman's stewardship as general manager. Manager Joe Girardi said that the possibility of trades has been addressed.

"We did talk about, you have to block out the noise, and you just have to go out and play, basically," Girardi said. "You can't worry about what you're not in control of. What we're in control of is wins and losses and how we perform. That's really the only thing you can worry about."

Bryan Hoch has covered the Yankees for MLB.com since 2007. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch, on Facebook and read his MLBlog, Bombers Beat. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.