Bryant can now add shortstop to resume

Bryant can now add shortstop to resume

CHICAGO -- Kris Bryant can add shortstop to his list of positions. Who knows? The versatile player may get a chance to test his defensive skills everywhere before the season is over.

"I was very surprised," Bryant said on Wednesday about being moved to shortstop in the ninth inning of Tuesday night's game vs. the Dodgers during a double switch.

Manager Joe Maddon went to the mound and told second baseman Ben Zobrist to move to short and that Tommy La Stella was going to play second. But then Maddon changed his mind and had Zobrist stay at second, La Stella go to third and Bryant to short.

"I was pretty surprised, but I figured there'd be a point at some time when I'd slip over there," said Bryant, who did not make a single play in his brief stint at short.

"It was funny to see," shortstop Addison Russell said. "We all know K.B. can play the position pretty well. He's an athletic guy."

So far this season, Bryant has played first, third, short and both corner outfield spots. He's the top vote-getter at third in the National League All-Star balloting released on Wednesday.

"I think [he] doesn't get enough attention," general manager Jed Hoyer said of Bryant. "This is an exceptionally talented player who is willing to do anything for the team. I can't think of a similar situation of a guy -- Minor League Player of the Year, Rookie of the Year -- who is so willing to do whatever it takes to help win the game. He comes to the ballpark every day not sure if he's going to play left or play third. It's pretty special.

"There's no doubt our manager likes to do that, and Kris embraces it. I do think it says a lot about Kris' character, how much he likes to win and how much he likes to be part of the team that he's willing to do that. He really embraces it and it gives us tremendous flexibility."

If asked, Bryant would play second. He played center field last season. He's joked about catching.

"I think it'd be cool to play all the positions," he said.

He doesn't care at all about being moved.

"I've never been the type of person to voice my opinion and say I'm only a third baseman," he said. "I don't like people who play the game that way. Joe Maddon's one of the best managers in the league, and you have to trust his judgement. I'm here to help the team. At times it'll be in left field like it is today. I don't mind it."

Carrie Muskat has covered the Cubs since 1987, and for MLB.com since 2001. She writes a blog, Muskat Ramblings. You can follow her on Twitter @CarrieMuskat and listen to her podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.