Braves' Olivera suspended through Aug. 1

No appeal after MLB's longest ban for violation of Domestic Violence Policy

Braves' Olivera suspended through Aug. 1

ATLANTA -- Braves outfielder Hector Olivera will spend the next couple of months serving the longest suspension that has been levied for a violation of Major League Baseball's Joint Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Child Abuse Policy.

Olivera has received an 82-game unpaid suspension that retroactively dates back to April 30 and runs through Aug. 1. The 31-year-old outfielder opted not to appeal the ruling, which MLB announced early Thursday evening. The Braves will host the Pirates on Aug. 2, the night Olivera can return.

"My office has completed its investigation into the allegation that Hector Olivera violated Major League Baseball's Joint Domestic Violence, Sexual Assault and Child Abuse Policy on April 13, 2016," Commissioner Rob Manfred said in a statement. "Having reviewed all of the available evidence, I have concluded that Mr. Olivera violated the Policy and should be subject to discipline in the form of an unpaid suspension that will expire on August 1st. Mr. Olivera has also agreed to make a significant charitable contribution to one or more charitable organizations focused on preventing and treating survivors of domestic violence."

Olivera was charged with one misdemeanor count of assault and battery after a female acquaintance alerted authorities that she had been assaulted at the Braves' team hotel in Arlington, Va., during the early morning hours of April 13. Olivera's next court hearing is scheduled for July 11.

MLB immediately placed Olivera on administrative leave following the arrest, and in cooperation with the MLB Players Association, the leave was extended beyond the seven-day period that is stipulated in the Domestic Violence Policy. The extension led to the agreement that the suspension would be made retroactive to April 30, instead of the arrest date.

Olivera's suspension will cost him approximately half of his $6 million salary for this season. Rockies shortstop Jose Reyes and Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman have also been suspended under the guidelines of the Domestic Violence Policy MLB instituted last year. Reyes' suspension covers 51 regular-season games, and Chapman was suspended for this season's first 30 games.

The Braves issued a statement that said the club "fully supports Major League Baseball's decision regarding Hector Olivera." Club officials will not provide any further comment at this time.

Olivera will be permitted to begin working out at the Braves' Spring Training complex on July 15. Once he completes his preparations and gets back into playing shape, he could begin an assignment with one of Atlanta's Minor League affiliates.

While this sets up the possibility that Olivera could be physically ready to return to the Majors at some point in August, his future with the Braves remains in question.

Braves officials have spent more than a month discussing the options they have in regard to the outfielder, who has disappointed both on and off the field since being acquired by Atlanta in the three-team, 13-player trade that sent former Braves top prospect Jose Peraza and Alex Wood to the Dodgers before last year's non-waiver Trade Deadline.

The Braves are responsible for the remaining $32.5 million owed through 2020 to Olivera, who has hit .245 and produced a .674 on-base plus slugging percentage through the first 30 games of his Major League career.

Mark Bowman has covered the Braves for MLB.com since 2001. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.