Chatwood's road work rewrites record books

Righty sets Rockies' mark with 27 2/3 scoreless IP away from Coors

Chatwood's road work rewrites record books

PITTSBURGH -- Right-hander Tyler Chatwood was too busy battling to concern himself with his place in Rockies history Saturday.

Chatwood, needing to be solid because Pirates pitcher Jonathon Niese was equally effective, held the Pirates to one run in six innings. Before giving up a fourth-inning run, he extended his road scoreless streak to a club-record 27 2/3 innings. But he was more concerned with keeping his team in position for an eventual 5-1 victory at PNC Park.

Chatwood, who gave up six hits and two walks against two strikeouts, broke the mark set by Ubaldo Jimenez -- 27 innings from May 9, 2010, to June 6, 2010. Chatwood also owns a 0.53 ERA in five road starts this season. It has been a strong return for Chatwood, who missed most of 2014 and all of 2015 because of Tommy John surgery.

"I'm just happy to be back out there," said Chatwood, who said he wasn't aware of the record until he saw a text from a friend he grew up with in California. "It was such a long road to recovery. Getting out there and playing with my teammates again was awesome."

On a wet Saturday, neither team could do much offensively. Chatwood said it wasn't a problem for him until later in the outing, when pitches began slipping from his hand. But he didn't let the game slip from him.

"'Chatty' did a great job," Rockies manager Walt Weiss said. "It's a tough lineup, a good team. You've got to score runs off a very tough pitching staff and shut down a tough offense."

The Pirates had consecutive singles with two out in the third, but Chatwood forced Gregory Polanco into a grounder -- one of 12 outs he forced that way. With two out in the fourth, Chatwod walked Josh Harrison and gave up a Jordy Mercer single that drove in a run. But he held the Pirates to one baserunner the rest of his outing.

"He's got deception, he's got downhill angle and he's got pretty good stuff," Pirates manager Clint Hurdle said. "The fastball's got some late life to it. The downhill angle for a guy his size, you don't see it a lot. He's able to create it. He's able to spin the ball as well."

Thomas Harding has covered the Rockies since 2000, and for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @harding_at_mlb, listen to podcasts and like his Facebook page. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.