Hot-hitting Ozuna makes Brewers pay on bases

Hot-hitting Ozuna makes Brewers pay on bases

MIAMI -- From the first game of the series on Monday, the Brewers showed they were willing to take chances on the bases. By the seventh inning on Wednesday, Marlins center fielder Marcell Ozuna was ready.

Ozuna threw out Jonathan Villar attempting to go from first to third on Ryan Braun's single, and the defensive gem ended the inning and was a pivotal moment in Miami's 3-2 win at Marlins Park.

"[Villar] did it in the first game, he challenged Ozuna," Marlins third baseman Martin Prado said. "This is a game of adjustments. Ozuna knew that they were trying to be aggressive. Even early in the first game when they tried to run, they were trying to get something going. He knew that and he attacked the ball, he got it cleanly and he was able to make a strong throw to third base."

Prado provided the inning-ending tag.

Ozuna pointed out that the outfield grass was playing slowly. The Brewers capitalized on that over the three games. In the seventh, Braun delivered a two-out RBI single, trimming Miami's lead to one run.

Milwaukee was in position to pull even or go ahead, but Villar, representing the tying run, again tested Ozuna's arm. This time, it didn't work.

"The grass is a little bit heavy," Ozuna said.

Ozuna noted the slow-playing outfield made it more difficult to charge the ball and throw runners out at the plate. But on the shorter throw to third, the ball bounced the center fielder's way.

"At third, the ball was good," Ozuna said. "You could get it pretty good. Prado made a good catch."

Ozuna hits a ground-rule double

At the plate, Ozuna ran his hit streak to 11 games, and in the fifth inning, he doubled and scored Miami's third run on Adeiny Hechavarria's sacrifice fly.

"I'm just trying to hit the ball, and that's it," Ozuna said. "I'm working on my swing, working in batting practice. I didn't even know it was 11. I don't like talking about a hitting streak."

Joe Frisaro has covered the Marlins for MLB.com since 2002. He writes a blog, called The Fish Pond. Follow him on Twitter @JoeFrisaro and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.