Hahn: Sox start 'real pleasant development'

Hahn: Sox start 'real pleasant development'

ARLINGTON -- White Sox general manager Rick Hahn continues to be impressed by his team's performance, especially considering that the club has thrived despite a difficult schedule to start the season.

Twenty of Chicago's first 35 games are on the road, including the three-game set with the Rangers that ends Wednesday. Entering Tuesday's game, the White Sox were 16-3 against teams that had winning records last season.

"This start was within the realm of possibility, but certainly when we looked at the schedule prior to the start of the season … we felt we had our work cut out for us," Hahn said. "We felt that the division was going to be tight, and the division will still very likely be tight by the end of the year again. For us to be able to create a little separation early is a real pleasant development."

Hahn attributed the team's early success to a deeply revamped lineup full of new acquisitions, including third baseman Todd Frazier and second baseman Brett Lawrie. Five of the nine players who started for the White Sox on Tuesday were with another club last season.

"When you bring in as many new players as we have, you don't quite know how it's going to mix together until they have the opportunity to be around each other and to gel," Hahn said. "This group came together quick and bonded tightly quickly, and there's been no letup since."

Sox defense shines vs. Twins

Frazier and Lawrie have also played key roles in upgrading Chicago's defense.

"We certainly were in the bottom three or four last year in a fair amount of defensive metrics, and now I think we've found ourselves in the top three or four thus far through the season," Hahn said. "That's a pretty dramatic turnaround, and one that we have reason to believe is sustainable based on the number of changed faces and changed positions. But again, that has come together fairly quickly."

Dave Sessions is a contributor to MLB.com based in Fort Worth. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.