A long Story short: 9th HR is a record!

A long Story short: 9th HR is a record!

DENVER -- Shortstop Trevor Story set a National League rookie record for home runs in April when he hit his ninth during the fourth inning off Pirates left-hander Jonathon Niese during the Rockies' eventual 9-8, 12-inning loss Wednesday night at Coors Field.

Story broke a mark held by the Cardinals' Albert Pujols, who had eight in 2001. White Sox slugger Jose Abreu holds the Major League record with 10 in 2014. The Rockies scored four runs in the fourth -- with Nolan Arenado also hitting his ninth home run -- to cut their deficit to 7-4.

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But Story, 23, took a called third strike from Pirates closer Mark Melancon to end the game with runners at second and third, and he wasn't in a celebratory mood. The Rockies have lost five straight and six of their last seven.

"It doesn't really mean anything to me at all right now," Story said. "Just trying to win games. That's the only thing that matters to me."

Story hits nine homers in April

Story had been in a 2-for-23 (.086) slump since his previous homer on April 18 against the Reds. Story and Arenado are tied for the Major League lead in home runs with the Nationals' Bryce Harper and the Mets' Neil Walker.

Story's homer was the first of four by the Rockies. Mark Reynolds and Gerardo Parra each hit their second homers, with Parra's in the eighth inning tying the game at 8.

The Rockies have three more games this month: Thursday at home against the Pirates, and Friday and Saturday at Arizona -- where Story hit four home runs in three games to open the season. The rookie record for any month is 18, set by the Tigers' Rudy York in August 1937. Mark McGwire's 49 for the A's in 1987 is the rookie record for a season. The NL single-season rookie record is 38, by the Braves' Wally Berger in 1930 and the Reds' Frank Robinson in 1956.

Story is on pace to hit 69 homers. So far, he has four at home and five on the road.

Thomas Harding has covered the Rockies since 2000, and for MLB.com since 2002. Follow him on Twitter @harding_at_mlb, listen to podcasts and like his Facebook page. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.