Archer ready to Snap a pose on Friday

Archer ready to Snap a pose on Friday

PORT CHARLOTTE, Fla. -- Chris Archer is cutting edge when social media is concerned. So nobody should be surprised that the Rays' ace has been using Snapchat for the past year.

"I think the thing I like about Snapchat is that it's a younger following," Archer said. "Some people from the PR department from the Rays told me I should get on it, because Facebook is a little bit of an older demographic. Twitter and Instagram are kind of in the middle. Then Snapchat is a little bit of a younger generation. It's nice to connect with fans from all ages. And that's why I'm on Snapchat."

On Friday, Major League Baseball's 30 teams are scheduled to publish Snapchat stories with photos and videos that will give fans a behind-the-scenes look at Spring Training.

Get ready for Snapchat Day Friday

MLB will allow all of its players to use Snapchat during Friday's Spring Training games. With the laid-back atmosphere of Spring Training, it's the perfect time to provide fans with a unique look at what goes on behind the scenes.

"The whole purpose of Snapchat is to let fans see things from our perspective," Archer said. "It's not a whole lot of selfie. It's more like outward. So they're seeing what we see on a regular basis."

Some players will be using their smartphones in the dugout as the games are going on, and they'll also test out the official SnapBat, which made its debut during last year's All-Star Weekend. Instead of fans being limited to watching games from the stands or televisions, this will be a chance to get a look inside the dugout with interactions that are often off-limits.

Archer particularly likes to connect with the younger fans.

"Yeah, I think I can offer a lot of inspiration and advice," Archer said. "I know how open their minds are. And I know how much hey absorb what we do. So if I can throw some positivity in there, I'll do that."

While Archer enjoys Snapchat and virtually all social media, he tries "not to get too overwhelmed with it, because it can get addicting."

"I have certain times of the day where I try to get on and be active. But for the most part, I try not to let it overwhelm me, because it can kill a lot of the time in your day."

Bill Chastain is a reporter for MLB.com. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.