Chapman: 'That's not my character'

Closer feels portrayed unfairly by media after incident

Chapman: 'That's not my character'

TAMPA, Fla. -- Yankees closer Aroldis Chapman believes that he has been portrayed unfairly in media reports as Major League Baseball considers potential discipline for his involvement in an Oct. 30 domestic incident.

"Yeah, just a little bit," Chapman said on Tuesday, through an interpreter. "That's not my character or the person I am."

Commissioner Rob Manfred said last week that he is close to ruling on pending domestic violence cases involving Chapman, Jose Reyes and Yasiel Puig.

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Yankees manager Joe Girardi said that he has been told that if Chapman is disciplined, only regular-season games would count under the suspension.

While Chapman would still be permitted to work out at the Yankees' facilities, it is possible that the league would also deem him ineligible to participate in Grapefruit League games.

"The way I understand it, he will not be pulled from Spring Training, but I don't think he's allowed to participate in games where there is an admission fee," Girardi said.

Chapman returned to camp and threw in the bullpen after an excused day off on Monday, which he said was spent in Miami.

"I was home and I was taking care of some personal things," Chapman said.

Chapman has spoken to investigators from MLB about the incident, during which the pitcher was accused by his girlfriend of pushing and choking her following an argument in his Davie, Fla., home. While locked in the garage, Chapman then fired eight gunshots into a wall and window.

No criminal charges were filed following investigations by the Davie Police Department and the Office of the State Attorney, citing conflicting accounts and insufficient evidence.

Chapman has said that he plans to appeal if suspended.

"To me, if it doesn't go my way, I'm just going to appeal," Chapman said. "I haven't hurt anybody."

Asked to clarify if he was speaking about the Oct. 30 incident, Chapman replied, "Just in general, I never hurt anybody. Never in my life."

Told of Chapman's comment, Girardi said, "Obviously, you hope that's the case."

Girardi said that he recently reviewed the police report regarding the incident, wanting to get a better handle on the exact details that were found as a result of the investigation.

"There's different accounts and it's long," Girardi said. "I don't know if we'll ever truly know exactly what happened, but there's different accounts. Obviously when there's domestic violence brought up, it's a concern. It's a real concern. It's a concern in our society for me. You worry about it."

Bryan Hoch is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @bryanhoch, on Facebook and read his MLBlog, Bombers Beat. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.