Beyonce to perform at Citi Field on June 7-8

Dead & Company set for June 25-26; Grammer to play on June 18

Beyonce to perform at Citi Field on June 7-8

NEW YORK -- Beyonce is coming to Citi Field, headlining another summer full of musical acts at the ballpark.

Just moments after performing in the Super Bowl 50 halftime show, Beyonce announced a new world tour in a television ad spot, which includes June 7-8 dates at Citi Field. The Mets earlier announced that Dead & Company will perform at their ballpark on June 25 and 26.

Beyonce's shows will mark her first time performing at Citi Field. The multiple-Grammy-winning artist debuted a new single and music video, "Formation," on Saturday prior to her Super Bowl guest appearance alongside Coldplay and Bruno Mars during halftime at Levi's Stadium in Santa Clara, Calif.

Dead & Company grew out of last summer's Grateful Dead farewell concerts, which featured original band members Mickey Hart, Bill Kreutzmann, Phil Lesh and Bob Weir, along with guests Trey Anastasio of Phish and singer/keyboardist Bruce Hornsby. Just weeks later, Dead & Company announced a fall tour, with a new lineup featuring singer and guitarist John Mayer, keyboardist Jeff Chimenti and bassist Otiel Burbridge, formerly of the Allman Brothers Band. Dead & Company played 19 shows through New Year's Eve, offering a set of Grateful Dead standards and covers.

Tickets for Beyonce's shows will go on sale to the general public on Feb. 16 at 10 a.m. ET, via Ticketmaster. Dead & Company tickets will become available on Saturday at 10 a.m. ET at mets.com/deadandcompany.

In addition to those shows, the Mets on Thursday began announcing details for their 2016 postgame summer concert series. Multiplatinum pop artist Andy Grammer will perform at Citi Field following the team's June 18 game against the Braves, with tickets starting at $27 and available at mets.com/concerts.

Anthony DiComo is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @AnthonyDiComo and Facebook, and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.