Harvey makes Top 100 Prospects list

Despite missing 2015 season due to injuries, righty ranked No. 85

Harvey makes Top 100 Prospects list

BALTIMORE -- Orioles pitcher Hunter Harvey has made MLB.com's Top 100 Prospects list again heading into 2016, with the right-hander coming in at No. 85 overall despite dealing with some injuries.

Harvey is Baltimore's lone representative on the list, and the 21-year-old is hopeful his reoccurring elbow issues -- which caused him to be shut down several times in 2015 -- are behind him. Harvey told reporters at the team's recent minicamp that he's been throwing for more than a month without an issue and that he is confident he will not require surgery. The expectation is Harvey will be a full-go at Spring Training, and this will be a big year to get the young hurler back on track starting for one of the O's affiliates.

The annual ranking of baseball's Top 100 Prospects is assembled by MLBPipeline.com Draft and prospect experts Jonathan Mayo, Jim Callis and Mike Rosenbaum, who compile input from industry sources, including scouts and scouting directors. It is based on analysis of players' skill sets, upsides, proximity to the Majors and potential immediate impact to their teams. Only players with rookie status entering the 2016 season are eligible for the list. The rankings follow the guidelines laid out by the Collective Bargaining Agreement, in terms of who falls under the international pool money rules: Players who were at least 23 years old when they signed and played in leagues deemed to be professional (Japan, Korea, Taiwan, Cuba) are not eligible.

MLB Pipeline's 2016 Top 100 Prospects list

Harvey, the son of former Major Leaguer Bryan Harvey, has started 25 games in the Minors since being selected by the Orioles in the first round of the 2013 Draft. He owns a 7-6 record and a 2.87 ERA in 113 innings over parts of two Minor League seasons.

Harvey entered 2015 ranked No. 42, and he was at No. 60 on the midseason Top 100 Prospects list.

Brittany Ghiroli is a reporter for MLB.com. Read her blog, Britt's Bird Watch, follow her on Facebook and Twitter @britt_ghiroli, and listen to her podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.