Brewers invite three more to big league camp

Brewers invite three more to big league camp

MILWAUKEE -- The Brewers signed a trio of players to Minor League contracts on Monday -- two of whom have played in the Majors -- and invited each to big league camp: first baseman Jake Elmore, outfielder Alex Presley and pitcher Daniel Tillman.

Presley, 30, is the most experienced of the trio, having appeared in the big leagues in 329 games over six different seasons for three clubs, most recently the Astros. He spent most of 2015 at Triple-A Fresno and posted a .292/.345/.367 slash line while manning all three outfield positions.

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The Brewers' primary need is center field, a "priority" for the remainder of the offseason, manager Craig Counsell said. Presley has played 63 Major League games at that position and 525 games in the Minors.

Ellmore, 28, has appeared at least once at all nine positions during parts of four seasons with the D-backs, Astros, Reds and Rays. His most Major League experience is at shortstop (47 games), followed by first base (26 games), second base (26 games), left field (15 games), third base (10 games) center field (two games), pitcher (two games), right field (one game) and catcher (one game). In the Minor Leagues, he's mostly manned second base while hitting .286/.385/.379 over eight seasons.

Elmore's jumping catch

Of the three, only Tillman has yet to make his Major League debut.The 26-year-old was a second-round Draft pick of the Angels in 2010 and owns a 3.98 ERA in 210 relief appearances and five starts. He posted a 2.76 ERA in 48 games for Dodgers affiliates in 2015, topping out at Double-A Tulsa.

The trio joins catchers Manny Pina and Rene Garcia, infielder Hernan Perez and right-hander Hiram Burgos on the list of non-roster invitees to Brewers camp. Pina arrived Thursday as a player to be named in an earlier trade with the Tigers.

Adam McCalvy is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter @AdamMcCalvy, like him on Facebook and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.