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Postgame interview with Bochy and Renteria

Postgame interview with Bochy and Renteria

Q. You apparently told Andres before your at-bat you were going to hit it out. What gave you that sense, that that was your moment?

EDGAR RENTERIA: I got confidence in me, but I was joking like I'm going to get it out. But it went out. But I got confident, looking for one pitch, and if he throws I'm going to hit it back to the middle. So he tried to throw the cutter, and the cutter stay in the middle and that's why it go out.

Q. You won the '97 series with a walk-off single and now this one. Is one bigger than the other?

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EDGAR RENTERIA: No, both is the same feeling, same emotions, same feeling. It's unbelievable. It's unbelievable being in that situation, and I enjoyed both World Series.

Q. Can you talk about what it felt like when you realized you had put your team on top 3-0, what it felt like when you hit the ball?

EDGAR RENTERIA: Yeah, that's a great feeling, but I no forget we play against a great offensive team like Texas. That's why I told my teammates, keep playing, keep playing, keep being concentration because we know they can tie the game right away. So teammates did a great job, and that's why we win.

Q. Did it feel any sweeter because you were hurt so much this year, and a lot of people didn't even think you were going to make the playoff roster, and here you end up MVP?

EDGAR RENTERIA: It's unbelievable. It's unbelievable. That's life. I've been hurt all year, but I keep myself in shape, keep myself working hard, and I keep telling myself, let's be patient, let it come over, and thank God everything worked out. I thank the organization. They had a lot of patience with me this year because I went three times to the DL.

Q. Through the Division Series and then the first game against Philadelphia, did you wonder if you'd ever get your chance to start in this? And Bruce, what was it that made you after Game 1 against the Phillies insert him into the starting lineup?

BRUCE BOCHY: Well, Edgar has been through it, and I wanted a leader out there. You know, he's a guy all the players look up to. I know it's been a tough year with the DL and missing playing time. But what a pro he's been through all this and waiting his turn. But once we got to that point, I knew I wanted to turn it over to him and put Juan at third base. You know, that was our best club. I couldn't have two better guys on the left side of the infield, the way they play, their experience, their composure. It's all about winning with them, and there's no fear in these guys.

I know how bad Edgar wanted it. It wasn't too long ago we had a little talk, and he said, I just want to go out and win another World Series, and I couldn't be prouder for him. I mean, it's pretty incredible what he's done in his career.

Q. Any part of you through the World Series thinking that this might be my last season of baseball? Any part of that go through your mind?

EDGAR RENTERIA: Yeah, yeah, all the time. But when we made it to the World Series I just took it out of my mind and just concentration to play the game and concentration on what I had to do to help this team win. I think that's why everything worked out good.

Q. Bruce, can you just talk about a bit what this means to you and what this means in a historic sense. This is a franchise that has been wanting to win something like this since probably everybody in this room was born, '54.

BRUCE BOCHY: Yeah, that last out, I've been fortunate to be in this game and manage for quite a while and have never been to this point. It's what you dream about, and the last Series didn't go well. I was just hoping to get one more chance at this. You know, it's a euphoric feeling that's so hard to describe.

For us to win for our fans, it's never been done there, and with all those great teams. And what was neat through all this is Willie McCovey and Willie Mays, Will Clark, J.T. Snow, Shawon Dunston, all those guys that played on World Series teams, they were in the clubhouse, they were pulling for these guys. They wanted them to win, and the players felt that along with the fans.

Q. What can you say to the fans right now in San Francisco that have suffered all these years?

BRUCE BOCHY: Oh, I couldn't be happier for them. They helped us get here. As Edgar could tell you, their energy, enthusiasm down the stretch, in the playoffs, it's been crazy, in the ballpark, around the city. I know how bad they wanted it. The players, they wanted it as bad for the fans as themselves because they know how long it's been.

Q. Edgar, when the count went to 2-0, did you think they might just go ahead and pitch around you there?

EDGAR RENTERIA: The first two pitches I think. I said, I think they're going to pitch me around, but I know Cliff Lee is a great pitcher. I have a lot of respect for him.

When he threw me the two balls, I said, I'm looking for one pitch. If he throws it, I'm going to swing. After that I'm working the count to see if he can walk me. But I got lucky, he throw cutter inside, the ball no cut. So the ball stayed in the middle.

Q. Bruce, everybody talks about your pitching and your defense, and going into Philadelphia everybody said well, hitting is kind of light, your offense. It seemed like throughout this series you came up with a key hit, a lot of hitting when you needed it. Can you talk a little bit about your hitting.

BRUCE BOCHY: It amazes me. When you look back at the pitching we had to beat, going back even to the clincher facing Latos, in Atlanta of course Hudson, Lowe in Atlanta, the Phillies' pitching with Halladay and Hamels and Oswalt, they found a way to get a big hit. And the key was we got contribution from everybody. Seemed like it was somebody different in the series. Edgar, he saved us. And that's what it takes to win.

You know, it's those timely hits, but it seemed like it was somebody different every day. We'd have one guy to carry us. You look at the pitching, we had to beat Lee twice. I'm sure a lot of people didn't think that was going to happen. But you know, because of our pitching, that gave us a chance.

Q. It looked like Burrell said something to you as he was walking by. Did he say something as you were walking up to the plate?

EDGAR RENTERIA: I know what he said, but he took a great at-bat in that at-bat, so I see a lot of pitches. I feel more comfortable when I see a lot of pitches when he hit foul balls. And I know he's going to come with the best pitch they had. I think the best pitch that he had tonight was a cutter, so that's what I was looking for. That's lucky.

Q. Bruce, how does it feel to be a genius? I mean, a lot of people didn't notice you until the Mattingly thing, coming to the mound twice, every move you made has been wonderful, praise is being heaped on you. How are you dealing with this?

BRUCE BOCHY: No, it's not me, believe me. It's these guys. Edgar, what he did in this series, all these guys. You know, and I can't say enough about how they accepted some roles. I'm sure they weren't happy with me, playing time, guys were used to going out there every day. But they stayed ready, and they had one thing on their mind, and that was to do this. And that's what it took because we did change some things. But it's not going to work unless they buy into it, and they did.

Q. Everything you did worked.

BRUCE BOCHY: They make it work, and that's how it works. Sure, you say, well, good move, whatever. That looks good if they get the hit or the bullpen comes in or does the job. So I thank them.

Q. Bruce, this afternoon you were talking about thoughts that were on your mind, being on the verge, that sort of thing. Now that you've reached the mountain top, what kinds of thoughts are you thinking? Are you reminiscing? Are you just celebrating? What's the mood?

BRUCE BOCHY: Yeah, you know, like I said, I was numb at first because you understand how hard this is to do. As long as I've been fortunate to be in this game, you know, you dream about this. And last night I didn't sleep, to be honest. I was thinking about it, you're on the verge and you know how close you are, and you put this on such a pinnacle that you get butterflies, as you mentioned earlier. I'm sure the players were thinking about it.

But it makes everything worthwhile, whatever you do when you get to this point. It's a lot of hard work.

Q. Edgar, can you compare the home run tonight with the game-winning hit in Game 7 in '97, only because the single was the game-winning hit was the last hit of the game. This you still had some innings to play.

EDGAR RENTERIA: Yeah, it's the same feeling, same feeling that I have right now. I think in '97 the thing played so hard all seven games, so we knew we had a chance to win, and we played against Cleveland. They had a great team, too. And this year, I think nobody believed what we can do, and that's so amazing. That's so amazing. That's a different feeling because they build the team to win, and this year we got the guys to win, that's a different way. And that's why I feel so great, so happy. And what's unbelievable, I just say thanks to the skipper to give me the chance to be in this situation right now, and so happy right now.

Q. Your hitting coach said before the game that all year you kept telling him, even when you were hurt, you were going to end up helping out the team. How were you able to be that confident even though you were on the DL three times?

EDGAR RENTERIA: Yeah, we had the confidence. I just know by myself, tried to tell my teammates to have the confidence and whatever can help the team do something, just do it. I just watched every at bat that they take. If they do something wrong, I just tell them because we want to win.

I think 25 guys did a great job to get this.

Q. Edgar, you've had a great career in the regular seasons, as well, but in the World Series you have one of the highest batting averages ever. Why do you think you've been such a great player particularly in the World Series?

EDGAR RENTERIA: I don't know. Maybe I am more in focus. I know it's a different game because if you make a mistake you're going to pay. That's why my focus is different, my level is different, and just want to be the guy to do something. But maybe I don't know. I can't explain that. I was ready to play.

Q. We've heard a lot about dreams obviously in the last few days. Aubrey said he dreamed of being a pitcher, Tim Lincecum dreamed of being a hitter. How close is this to your dream?

BRUCE BOCHY: Well, this is your dream. It starts out when you're a kid playing wiffle ball in the backyard when you sign a professional contract. Players talk about winning awards sometimes, whether Cy Youngs or MVPs, but they always deflect that to, I want to win the World Series. That's what the game is about, being in this moment right now. So I'm living a dream.

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