Flame-throwing Chapman next on Hot Stove?

Club seeking young Major League-ready players with minimum service time

Flame-throwing Chapman next on Hot Stove?

CINCINNATI -- A big-time, power-armed closer was traded to begin the weekend on Friday night, but it wasn't Aroldis Chapman departing from the Reds. Instead, it was Craig Kimbrel, who went from the Padres to Red Sox in exchange for four top prospects.

It took one potential trade partner away from the Reds, but it appeared the Red Sox preferred to have their new closer for the long haul. Chapman can be a free agent after the 2016 season, while Boston will have Kimbrel under contract through 2018.

"Kimbrel was a bit of a different animal than Chapman, in terms of club control," Reds general manager Dick Williams told MLB.com on Saturday. "We didn't feel like we missed out on a deal with them. There will be other teams that are interested in Chapman.

"I don't control who is out there or who will be interested. We feel that there are other offers. We feel that he's the best closer out there, so [we] hope good stuff can happen."

The Tigers, D-backs, Astros and Marlins are among the other clubs seeking a new closer.

Rosenthal on Hot Stove news

For a return on any deal, Cincinnati is seeking young Major League-ready players who are in the zero-to-three-year range of service time for maximum club control. Williams and president of baseball operations Walt Jocketty made it clear during the General Managers Meetings this week they were willing to listen to trade proposals on any of the team's veteran players.

Williams did not believe the Reds were close to a match to move Chapman -- or another player -- imminently.

"We've had lots of productive conversations," Williams said. "The teams at the GM Meetings showed up prepared for discussions. We made more progress than most people remembered from past GM Meetings."

Mark Sheldon is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Mark My Word, follow him on Twitter @m_sheldon and Facebook and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.