Gordon: Journey to WS champs 'unbelievable'

Gordon: Journey to WS champs 'unbelievable'

KANSAS CITY -- When Royals outfielder Alex Gordon grabbed the microphone on the victory stage during Tuesday's World Series celebration rally, he had a subtle message for Mets right-hander Noah Syndergaard.

"I have to say that we had a trick up our sleeves, too -- it's called World Series champs," Gordon said to a thunderous ovation from an estimated 200,000 Royals fans gathered at Union Station.

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That, of course, was in reference to Syndergaard's suggestion before Game 3 of the World Series that he would have a trick up his sleeve for how to pitch to first-pitch-fastball-hungry Alcides Escobar to start the game. That trick wound up being a heater near Escobar's head, a tactic that angered the Royals and manager Ned Yost.

But on Tuesday, it was Gordon and the Royals who were celebrating a World Series championship.

For Gordon, the championship was beyond special, considering he is the longest-tenured Royal.

"What up, guys?" Gordon said to the fans. "I just want to give you guys thanks for everything. I've been here since 2007. I've been through the bad times, and to see it come out like this, it is truly unbelievable.

"We're World Series champs and you guys are the best fans in the world."

Gordon certainly was instrumental in the World Series outcome. His stunning home run in the bottom of the ninth off Mets closer Jeurys Familia tied the score in Game 1 -- the Royals went on to win it in 14 innings and set the tone for the Series.

Gordon on WS win, parade

"I want to give a shout out to all my brothers behind me," Gordon told the crowd. "You don't know how much work all these guys put in every day to do what they do and be the best team they can be."

And Gordon also wanted to thank the two men who stood by him in tough times when his struggles in the big leagues led to him switching from third base, the position he was drafted to play, to left field. The position switch turned his career around and he became a four-time Gold Glove Award winner.

"I want to thank [general manager] Dayton Moore and want to thank [manager] Ned Yost," Gordon said. "You gave us confidence to go out there and play our best every day."

And now, Gordon's future is uncertain. He has a player option on his 2016 contract for approximately $13.25 million, an option he almost surely will turn down, thus making him a free agent. Gordon said during the postseason he would take a few days off after the season to consider his plans.

Gordon has until Friday night at 11 p.m. CT to decide on the option.

Jeffrey Flanagan is a reporter for MLB.com. Follow him on Twitter at @FlannyMLB This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.