Eaton, Flowers to have offseason surgery

Outfielder to undergo arthroscopic procedure on left shoulder

Eaton, Flowers to have offseason surgery

CHICAGO -- Add Adam Eaton to a list of White Sox players having "clean-up" procedures at the end of the season.

Eaton told a group of media members on Sunday that arthroscopic surgery will be done on his left shoulder in Chicago on Monday morning. It's been a problem he has played with since late July.

"Just make sure it's functioning next year," Eaton said. "It's been kind of a hassle most of the season with throwing and diving and what not. I guess just some scheduled maintenance.

"Not to get into too much detail, but it's a nerve decompression. They are doing a couple of things of that nature just to make sure my muscles are functioning properly and I don't have any pain. I'm excited to sleep better and be able to put my hand above my shoulder in the future. It should be outpatient type stuff, so it shouldn't be a big deal. I should be fishing in about two or three weeks."

Second baseman Micah Johnson had his left knee successfully scoped on Thursday and will be fully ready for Spring Training. Johnson was at the ballpark Saturday on crutches.

Tyler Flowers will undergo arthroscopic surgery on his right knee on Friday. That knee issue has been affecting Flowers for "a while," according to the catcher.

"It stayed steady toward the beginning of it," said Flowers of his knee. "More so actually recently it has become a little bit more of a pain. I don't think it really hinders me too much. It's more dealing with the pain and anticipation of the pain, doing certain things.

"That was kind of the challenge. It's probably more mental. The pain isn't enough to bother you. You start knowing you are going to do something and it's going to hurt, your mind takes over and backs off a little bit. It's been a while. It's been multiple months."

Scott Merkin is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Merk's Works, follow him on Twitter @scottmerkin and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.