Nolasco activated, expected to pitch in relief

Twins righty out since June 1 with right ankle injury

Nolasco activated, expected to pitch in relief

MINNEAPOLIS -- Right-hander Ricky Nolasco, who rejoined the Twins this week after pitching in a simulated game in Florida, was activated from the 60-day disabled list on Friday.

Nolasco, who has been out since June 1 with a right ankle injury that caused him to undergo surgery July 13, threw 49 pitches without any issues in an intrasquad game in Fort Myers, Fla., on Monday. Twins manager Paul Molitor said Nolasco will pitch in relief down the stretch instead of starting.

"There were some things we had to go through to make sure everything was all good in terms of medical through MLB, and that was taken care of yesterday, so he's good to go," Molitor said. "We're still not sure if we're going to use him, but he deserves to be active considering what he's done and how he's responded physically the last couple weeks. I know he's only pitched a couple innings of a not very meaningful game since late May, but at least we have another healthy arm out there."

The Twins created a spot on their 40-man roster to make room for Nolasco by placing left-hander Logan Darnell on the 60-day DL. Darnell was called up on Sept. 4 but has been out with pneumonia and won't pitch again this season.

Molitor commended Nolasco for his work in trying to get back from the injury, and he said he'll try to find the right spot to get him into a game. But Nolasco said he understands if he's not used this season with the Twins still in the mix for the second American League Wild Card spot.

"If I get into a game, that's great," Nolasco said. "If I don't, I'm just trying not to disrupt what these guys are doing here. With the season winding down, we don't really have a chance to stretch out and get more appearances. I'm just trying to go home healthy."

Rhett Bollinger is a reporter for MLB.com. Read his blog, Bollinger Beat, follow him on Twitter @RhettBollinger and listen to his podcast. This story was not subject to the approval of Major League Baseball or its clubs.